Nissan Murano Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello!
I have an 05 Murano with 143K miles on it.
It’s the AWD version. After about a 2 hour drive with some steep hills, after I get off the highway, my car makes a loud winding noise when accelerating and then continues after i release the gas pedal until i come to a complete stop. I drive this drive about 10-20 times a month so it’s a persistent noise i hear every time. I’m not the original owner, i bought the car with 120K miles on it. The car started making this noise when i hit about 130K. Any suggestions?
 

·
Registered
2011 Nissan Murano AWD
Joined
·
790 Posts
Hello!
I have an 05 Murano with 143K miles on it.
It’s the AWD version. After about a 2 hour drive with some steep hills, after I get off the highway, my car makes a loud winding noise when accelerating and then continues after i release the gas pedal until i come to a complete stop. I drive this drive about 10-20 times a month so it’s a persistent noise i hear every time. I’m not the original owner, i bought the car with 120K miles on it. The car started making this noise when i hit about 130K. Any suggestions?
Just to be clear, you only hear this noise after going on the aforementioned drive through the steep hills and the noise is otherwise not heard anytime else, correct?

On a side note, if you have no idea of the service history of the car then it would be wise to change the oil in the CVT, transfer case, and rear differential.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,481 Posts
Just to be clear, you only hear this noise after going on the aforementioned drive through the steep hills and the noise is otherwise not heard anytime else, correct?

On a side note, if you have no idea of the service history of the car then it would be wise to change the oil in the CVT, transfer case, and rear differential.
This is good advice. At the very least, all fluid levels should be checked immediately, and at 120K it's a great idea to change all these fluids.

I'm not sure what's going on, but since the noise continues while the car is in motion it seems to relate to the motion of the driveline members.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Just to be clear, you only hear this noise after going on the aforementioned drive through the steep hills and the noise is otherwise not heard anytime else, correct?

On a side note, if you have no idea of the service history of the car then it would be wise to change the oil in the CVT, transfer case, and rear differential.
Hello
I do only hear this noise after those drives yes. Every time i get the oil changed i also get the differential oil changed because there is a tiny leak in that but that fixes that every time, but i will look into getting the cvt and transfer case oil changed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I've gone through nine CVTs and five TCs. With CVT replacements 2, 5 and 7, a whining preceeded their ultimate demise. Once, the death blow was a very steep hill in L.A. traffic where I had to keep stopping on that hill and starting again over a 10-minute duration...a couldn't make it to the top and had to roll back off the side of the road and call for a ramp truck. The other time was on the 405, going up a long slope after coming back from Long Beach, about a 2-hour drive. CVT 7 was only three months old when MO took a hard hit on the driver's front wheel from a red-light runner. About 2-3 months later, that CVT developed a whine and started to fail. CVTs 3 and 8 developed a clunking noise that pertained to a piece of metal breaking off inside and bouncing around, and CVT 8 also had developed a whine. CVTs 1 and 6 had a burning rubber smell and serious fluid leaks. Don't recall if there was a whine or not. I think only one transfer case was actually bad, and it developed a leak and had some noise. The other TC replacements, as I recall, were done following Nissan's protocal of replacing the TC whenever a CVT needed to be changed; you did the two pieces as one unit. CVT 9 was a salvage pick out of a 2006 MO that already had 120,000 miles on it. I've since put about an additional 160,000 miles...got a good one. :)

Changing the fluids might help...but my fluids were very new and still the CVT went bad. Hope you have better luck. If you intend to keep your MO, you might want to start searching salvage yards for a used CVT, and get some install quotes from you local mechanics, just to be safe.
 

·
Registered
2011 Nissan Murano AWD
Joined
·
790 Posts
Hello
I do only hear this noise after those drives yes. Every time i get the oil changed i also get the differential oil changed because there is a tiny leak in that but that fixes that every time, but i will look into getting the cvt and transfer case oil changed!
What you may be hearing is the CVT "whining" as Cryogenix1 described since long drives on steep hills/mountains can cause the transmission to run hot. Definitely look into changing those fluids (...some people claim a CVT fluid change fixed their CVT whine issue). Also, if you have an android phone or tablet, you may want to consider downloading the CVTz50 app ($5) along with a cheap OBDII adapter on Amazon. This app can do all kinds of diagnostics on the CVT among other things and will allow you to check if any transmission-related trouble codes are/were stored in the Transmission Control Module. It can also monitor CVT fluid temperature in real time so you can watch the temperatures while doing these drives and see if the CVT is indeed running hot (...the app will tell you in addition to displaying the actual fluid temperature).

BTW...rear differential oil leaks are rare--where exactly is it leaking from and what do you mean that changing the gear oil "fixes that every time"?

Good luck and keep us updated!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
What you may be hearing is the CVT "whining" as Cryogenix1 described since long drives on steep hills/mountains can cause the transmission to run hot. Definitely look into changing those fluids (...some people claim a CVT fluid change fixed their CVT whine issue). Also, if you have an android phone or tablet, you may want to consider downloading the CVTz50 app ($5) along with a cheap OBDII adapter on Amazon. This app can do all kinds of diagnostics on the CVT among other things and will allow you to check if any transmission-related trouble codes are/were stored in the Transmission Control Module. It can also monitor CVT fluid temperature in real time so you can watch the temperatures while doing these drives and see if the CVT is indeed running hot (...the app will tell you in addition to displaying the actual fluid temperature).
I've recently acquired a 2005 built Murano. It was on the cheaper side which may suggest potential issues. After braking abruptly and having the front left wheel be a bit less attached than it should be, I took it to our mechanic who said the CVT was slipping, and at 125k miles it was likely well old and going to need replacing soon. He suspects the previous owners did the old CVT fluid change in an attempt to get a bit longer out of it. So it's a big unknown - which I thought CVTz50 might offer some insights.

So that's the background, the question: Any 'cheap OBDII adaptor on Amazon' in particulary known to work? I've got a cheap one from elsewhere but it's not allowing CVTz50 to actually read anything, and I suspect it's a not-implemented-properly-knock off, so hoping to avoid going through a series of incomplete clones...



J,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,113 Posts
I've recently acquired a 2005 built Murano. It was on the cheaper side which may suggest potential issues. After braking abruptly and having the front left wheel be a bit less attached than it should be, I took it to our mechanic who said the CVT was slipping, and at 125k miles it was likely well old and going to need replacing soon. He suspects the previous owners did the old CVT fluid change in an attempt to get a bit longer out of it. So it's a big unknown - which I thought CVTz50 might offer some insights.

So that's the background, the question: Any 'cheap OBDII adaptor on Amazon' in particulary known to work? I've got a cheap one from elsewhere but it's not allowing CVTz50 to actually read anything, and I suspect it's a not-implemented-properly-knock off, so hoping to avoid going through a series of incomplete clones...



J,
This inexpensive OBD2 dongle for the Android app CVTz50 has excellent reviews:

Amazon.com: Veepeak Mini Bluetooth OBD2 Scanner OBD II Car Diagnostic Scan Tool for Android & Windows, Check Engine Light Code Reader, Supports Torque Pro, OBD Fusion, DashCommand, Car Scanner App: Automotive
 
  • Like
Reactions: davisonja

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Hello!
I have an 05 Murano with 143K miles on it.
It’s the AWD version. After about a 2 hour drive with some steep hills, after I get off the highway, my car makes a loud winding noise when accelerating and then continues after i release the gas pedal until i come to a complete stop. I drive this drive about 10-20 times a month so it’s a persistent noise i hear every time. I’m not the original owner, i bought the car with 120K miles on it. The car started making this noise when i hit about 130K. Any suggestions?
Sounds to me like you might need to replace your bearings wheel bearings often need to be replaced way before transmission fluid needs to be changed which was the case with my all-wheel-drive Murano I changed front bearings front axles and it came out to be just the bearings
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
If it's a bad wheel bearing, you can usually make the sounds go away (or at least change dramatically) by driving straight and suddenly making a hard-nose turn in one direction, then the other, and so on. My wheel bearings, when going bad, tended to make a whirring sound as opposed to winding or whining. And the sounds should slow as your vehicle slows. Same with the axles, in many cases.

If you want to get creative and don't think it's CVT noise, you can do what I did... I took a piece of 3-foot-long angle iron, C-clamped it to the subframe, then clamped my camcorder to that and pointed it at each axle/front wheel and recorded as I drove along doing various manuevers. I then extended the angle iron to the outer wheel wells on both front tires (doing one at a time, obviously) and drove around.

After playing back all the footage, I found that what I thought was a bad wheel bearing on the driver's front side, was actually a bad tire on the passenger's front side. Given the craziness of the noise, I would've bet anything it was a wheel bearing. I ended up switching the front tires to the rear, and the noise then was behind me, where it wasn't as bad. Acoustics are tricky under a car, especially when you're inside trying to hear through so many surfaces.

After a month of having the noise behind me, I got rid of the Goodyear Eagle LS tires (that were only two years old) and went with the Firestone Destination LE2 tires, which I really prefer.
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top