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Redline, one of the main causes of the belt to fail, is the steel guide balls that key the sliding pulley to the shaft. Depending on how many miles and how the car is driven the constant torque on those balls that are only contacting an infinite point on their little tiny radius, they put divots in the grooves on the shaft and maybe the sliding collar as well, then they stick and get torn and cracked when those divots get deep enough to hold them, when the balls get destroyed they essentially lock the sliding action of the pulley and then that rips the belt apart. This mostly happens to the primary pulley. If it didn't cause too much destruction and the grooves are not too messed up, there is a pin kit, it has hard steel pins to replace the balls, and some times can salvage slightly messed up grooves. In a pinch you can use the ends of 6mm cobalt drill bits. There are some youtube videos on that topic. To take the pulleys apart the big nuts are your first battle, impact wrench is likely the only way, a nice large harbor freight puller will work to separate the pulleys.
If you need more info I can get some links. Have fun, it took me 1 week to get the transmission out of a 2004, some long and some short days. The ultra tight fasteners were horrible, and the rusty exhaust fasteners. You do not need to remove the exhaust manifold, just the cat its a battle of rust use liquid wrench. I used a gantry crane with 2 chain hoists one to support the engine and one to support and lower the transaxle, I used harbor freight straps to lift with and 2 around the engine coolant manifold above the transmission to hold the engine have to lower both at the same time when tilting the trans down. I did not have to drain the coolant.
Do not follow everyone on youtube, I leave the brake calipers on and just remove from the lower ball joint. For the shift cable leave it in the bracket remove the 2 bolts, and remove the lever nut, then you won't have to fool with adjustments. If you are just tipping the transmission down to get to the vairators you won't need to fool with the shift cable. But you will need to drop the subframe, remove the front and rear mounts, and the 2 bolts that hold the steering rack, you don't need to disconnect the power steering lines etc. it will help to have 2 floor jacks to lower the subframe. Keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Redline, one of the main causes of the belt to fail, is the steel guide balls that key the sliding pulley to the shaft. Depending on how many miles and how the car is driven the constant torque on those balls that are only contacting an infinite point on their little tiny radius, they put divots in the grooves on the shaft and maybe the sliding collar as well, then they stick and get torn and cracked when those divots get deep enough to hold them, when the balls get destroyed they essentially lock the sliding action of the pulley and then that rips the belt apart. This mostly happens to the primary pulley. If it didn't cause too much destruction and the grooves are not too messed up, there is a pin kit, it has hard steel pins to replace the balls, and some times can salvage slightly messed up grooves. In a pinch you can use the ends of 6mm cobalt drill bits. There are some youtube videos on that topic. To take the pulleys apart the big nuts are your first battle, impact wrench is likely the only way, a nice large harbor freight puller will work to separate the pulleys.
If you need more info I can get some links. Have fun, it took me 1 week to get the transmission out of a 2004, some long and some short days. The ultra tight fasteners were horrible, and the rusty exhaust fasteners. You do not need to remove the exhaust manifold, just the cat its a battle of rust use liquid wrench. I used a gantry crane with 2 chain hoists one to support the engine and one to support and lower the transaxle, I used harbor freight straps to lift with and 2 around the engine coolant manifold above the transmission to hold the engine have to lower both at the same time when tilting the trans down. I did not have to drain the coolant.
Do not follow everyone on youtube, I leave the brake calipers on and just remove from the lower ball joint. For the shift cable leave it in the bracket remove the 2 bolts, and remove the lever nut, then you won't have to fool with adjustments. If you are just tipping the transmission down to get to the vairators you won't need to fool with the shift cable. But you will need to drop the subframe, remove the front and rear mounts, and the 2 bolts that hold the steering rack, you don't need to disconnect the power steering lines etc. it will help to have 2 floor jacks to lower the subframe. Keep us posted.
Wow! very well explained! thank you so much!!
I have read somewhere that the main cause that the belt usually snapped is that 6mm balls on the primary pulley that wear out,the steel pins sounds like a better upgrade,I will most likely need to import it as it will not be available in South Africa,but let me remove everything and so I will let you know.
Thanx for your help I do Appreciate,cant wait to give life to this car again,I have never driven one.:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
While I am typing my arms and hands are so stiff!
This is not an easy job to do😔
But I am not done yet,the hardest part of this was the side shaft nuts in the front,I actually breaked my powerbar,got a second one and I twist it.
The impact also did not worked.
I have been battling for hours.
I phoned a friend and he came to help and welded the 32 socket to a piece of solid steel bar that came of some pickup truck,and it worked!! Woohooo.
So most of the bolts and nuts are all loosen,I actually took a photo that I will attached.
Today I just loosen the break callibers and removed the battery tray so I could have more space to work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I need to go in town tommorow morning for work and some exstra sockets,then I will remove the nuts from the torque converter and the rest of the bolts on the transmission...(P.S excuse my spelling,my 1st Language is Afrikaans)
 

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There is no need to do a thing with the brake calipers. Leave all that spindle junk hanging on the shock strut. Just use a strap or rope to pull it either front or rear out of the way. All that stuff is unnecessary work do. If you have the right side stub cv axle drive shaft take out the 3 bolts use some lube like liquid wrench on the flange area and wait till other stuff is out of the way to remove that. Tap on one of the bolt ears with a soft hammer to slightly twist is then pry easily on that dust flange near the trans and keep twisting that flange deal, no need to over force it.
So you have some stupid over tightened by the factory bolts. It took me a week to get the trans out, some long and some not so long days. I took all the plastic inner fender stuff out of the front area's of the fenders to better get to the transmission side mount and the sub frame nuts. You need to of course take off the steering tie rod ball joint nuts that have cotter pins so heads up on those hard to see if the car in not up on a lift. No I have no lift.
In that picture you are DOING IT WRONG. That is how everyone on youtube does it, except for the professional shops(they do it like I did). Do not leave all that heavy stuff with the sub frame all that can stay with the car (the spindles and such). When I did mine I had to plan on reassembling it all to get the car out of the shop on its own wheels, so yeah I installed all that sub frame and suspension without the transmission in the car, and I made a support system for the engine so it could be rolled out. I need the space to work.

I used an emoji and messed up the first post and said it needed admin approval, I had no idea how long that would take so here it is again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
There is no need to do a thing with the brake calipers. Leave all that spindle junk hanging on the shock strut. Just use a strap or rope to pull it either front or rear out of the way. All that stuff is unnecessary work do. If you have the right side stub cv axle drive shaft take out the 3 bolts use some lube like liquid wrench on the flange area and wait till other stuff is out of the way to remove that. Tap on one of the bolt ears with a soft hammer to slightly twist is then pry easily on that dust flange near the trans and keep twisting that flange deal, no need to over force it.
So you have some stupid over tightened by the factory bolts. It took me a week to get the trans out, some long and some not so long days. I took all the plastic inner fender stuff out of the front area's of the fenders to better get to the transmission side mount and the sub frame nuts. You need to of course take off the steering tie rod ball joint nuts that have cotter pins so heads up on those hard to see if the car in not up on a lift. No I have no lift.
In that picture you are DOING IT WRONG. That is how everyone on youtube does it, except for the professional shops(they do it like I did). Do not leave all that heavy stuff with the sub frame all that can stay with the car (the spindles and such). When I did mine I had to plan on reassembling it all to get the car out of the shop on its own wheels, so yeah I installed all that sub frame and suspension without the transmission in the car, and I made a support system for the engine so it could be rolled out. I need the space to work.

I used an emoji and messed up the first post and said it needed admin approval, I had no idea how long that would take so here it is again.
Hi Chidog,thank you for reply,as I read you got better experience then me and better tools to work with.
I bought this car for around $1400/$1500 (If I convert SA Rand value correct) as a project to work on. (shops asking around $2000 dollar on labor only for removing the transmission thats very expensive!!
My previous Project was a little pocket rocket 1994 1.4 Fiat Uno Turbo that I restored and it was a fun project. (that was 6 years back) I removed that cars transmission twice and also did some engine work and replaced turbo + intercooler,etc.
So this is totally a bigger vehicle and more heavy lifting so I try my best to do the job easy as possible (not maybe professional as the shops) and while removing the transmission I see some broken rubbers,stable arms,ball joints,etc and make a list to replace them too
I will attached a picture of my murano the the day I picked it up with my Ranger.
will keep the post updated as I worked on the murano
 

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Looks nice. I am just trying to give some good tips on how to make the job easier. Like that sub frame you just don't need the extra parts flopping around on it or the extra weight. And if you do it like I did, the stuff is not in the way too badly, and can be held out of the way with a strap or rope. Same goes for the steering rack there are 2 bolts that go into it from the rear, I don't remember the size I think its 19mm. the steering wheel shaft will hold that side up and on the other side I tied it up a bit just to keep it level, tied around the tie rod that is. Is yours an all wheel drive? Are you leaving the engine in the car? I did.
I just removed the transmission. If its an AWD you need to remove the transfercase(if your removing the whole transmission), and it very likely needs seals, mine only had a very small amount of oil in it.
You are not going to want to go through all this work for nothing. Correct?
There is a reason the CVT belt got messed up!!!! It could have been mostly those steel balls in the variators. And another thing with these transmissions is the flow control valve, that is in the fluid pump housing, and a not to difficult thing to do once the transmission is out. Also this is a good time to replace all the seals, for the CV shafts etc. and maybe even the torque converter seal. If you are removing the torque converter when reinstalling it you need to measure from the face where the transmission fits to the engine to the pad that goes to the flex plate. I can give you that dimension and it is on line as well I will have to find that stuff for you when the time comes.
 

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Yeah, the variator assemblies will need to be taken apart, which will require more tools. This is a big job to attempt and the OP is overseas in an area that probably doesn't have the kind of readily available resources we have here in the U.S. I hope it works out for him.
 

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The tools needed are. (1) Impact wrench the 1/2 inch earth quake harbor freight is real good. Of course a compressor to run it. (2) large 3 jaw harbor freight puller, it is good to pad the jaws with small aluminum pieces or even leather would do. The pulley faces are pretty hard, I did not damage them when first using the puller to release the pressure to remove the belt, but did pad for the removing the press fit of the piston on the shaft. (3) the proper size sockets, I used under size ones and ground them to fit tightly, don't remember the sizes right now, I will post it later. (4) A press to reassemble the variators, this was a huge pain on this transmission version, unlike the ones they show on youtube being easy. It is very easy to cock the piston and gouge the drum, so help is needed to help spot and help keep things straight and adjust when it isn't. And the most important thing is almost surgical cleanliness. Card board and lint free car painting cloths help, some brake clean. In that country they do alot of aviation repairs etc. They have the tools, but probably not everywhere. If there is some steel and a welder tools could be made. Yes you will not want to just try to put a new belt on, the cause has to be found.
And yes the variators will have to come apart, watch you tube videos how to catch the steel guide balls. Yours maybe trash, and your primary variator maybe trash as well, I hope not.
Every little part of this job, from removal to transmission it self, is a huge huge headache, and battle. It would have been nice to know if that transmission had any codes it set. If it had P0868 then for sure you need to deal with the pump flow control valve. There is the "This is your transmission" guy on you tube that just changed the variators and had to go back into the transmission to put in the drop in Transgo flow control valve. Yes that meant taking the transmission back out of the car. So try to get it right the first time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #34 ·
Looks nice. I am just trying to give some good tips on how to make the job easier. Like that sub frame you just don't need the extra parts flopping around on it or the extra weight. And if you do it like I did, the stuff is not in the way too badly, and can be held out of the way with a strap or rope. Same goes for the steering rack there are 2 bolts that go into it from the rear, I don't remember the size I think its 19mm. the steering wheel shaft will hold that side up and on the other side I tied it up a bit just to keep it level, tied around the tie rod that is. Is yours an all wheel drive? Are you leaving the engine in the car? I did.
I just removed the transmission. If its an AWD you need to remove the transfercase(if your removing the whole transmission), and it very likely needs seals, mine only had a very small amount of oil in it.
You are not going to want to go through all this work for nothing. Correct?
There is a reason the CVT belt got messed up!!!! It could have been mostly those steel balls in the variators. And another thing with these transmissions is the flow control valve, that is in the fluid pump housing, and a not to difficult thing to do once the transmission is out. Also this is a good time to replace all the seals, for the CV shafts etc. and maybe even the torque converter seal. If you are removing the torque converter when reinstalling it you need to measure from the face where the transmission fits to the engine to the pad that goes to the flex plate. I can give you that dimension and it is on line as well I will have to find that stuff for you when the time comes.
Chidog I really appreciate your advice and I do take note of all the things you mentioned.
This is an AWD version,do I really need to take the transfercase apart or can I leave it on the transmission? and only disconnect the shaft with the 4 bolts?
I am going to replace all the leaking seals and what needs to be replaced.
I also decide to take out the complete transmission and take it apart to check that flow control valve as I read its a common issue,hopefully the pulleys are not in a bad condition.
All what I know,Nissan asked the previous owner crazy expensive price to do CVT oil change and the owner did not accept it,so the oil is very dirty.
Today I want to shop for a wrench with a smaller head so it can fit nicely into that gap where to remove the nuts of the torque converter.
On the top of the post you will see the error codes that I got,it was the output speed sensor (P0720 If I remember correctly) and then oil pressure something.
 

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nitely, the only new parts that can be bought that I know, are the gasket/ seal/ clutch kits, the Transtar kit even had valve body kit and included the steel balls if someone wants them, and it included the steel pins to use instead of the balls. There are various outfits that sell kits, I think even amazon does. For special fix parts there is Sonnax and Transgo, maybe Superior ?? All found online.
They may even have a youtube channel too.

Before removing the transmission of course drain the fluid, (I know you did that to see the damage) also drain the transfer case, mine had very little oil as it had a leak.
You need to remove the transfer case off the transmission, I think to get to bolts? It removes easy. The torque converter nuts --I got a deep socket and ground the face flat, to get rid of the lead in angles on the flats, those nuts are very thin and you don't want it slipping off. To loosen you turn ratchet to loosen and let the flywheel move the socket to the side of the opening hole, I used a thin about maybe 7 to 8 mm piece of wood to let the socket contact so it would keep everything straight,and not let the ratchet touch the side of the hole, the side of the hole holds the socket so the flywheel wont turn, while you loosen the nut.
 

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The socket for the torque converter nuts, I may have used a breaker bar on it, I don't remember. It was ground at the end then small lathe turned a little bit, the idea is to make the flats fairly sharp and square as the nuts are very thin, if you round them off you will then have to mess things up to get it off. They are very tight, and when reinstalling they do not need to be more than I think 30 foot pounds torque, and use blue thread locker, never use red on anything you ever wish to get apart again. Unless you can heat it to I think 400 degrees F.
So this socket is a 1/2 drive 14 mm.

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Im curious as to where are you sourcing all these replacement cvt parts you are mentioning?
This YT video lists a number of suppliers and catalogs for rebuilding Jatco and other transmissions.
He also has a detailed instructional video of Jatco JF011E overhaul in the link.
There is now enough interest in auto service industry to service CVTs.
 

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Chidog I really appreciate your advice and I do take note of all the things you mentioned.
This is an AWD version,do I really need to take the transfercase apart or can I leave it on the transmission? and only disconnect the shaft with the 4 bolts?
I am going to replace all the leaking seals and what needs to be replaced.
I also decide to take out the complete transmission and take it apart to check that flow control valve as I read its a common issue,hopefully the pulleys are not in a bad condition.
All what I know,Nissan asked the previous owner crazy expensive price to do CVT oil change and the owner did not accept it,so the oil is very dirty.
Today I want to shop for a wrench with a smaller head so it can fit nicely into that gap where to remove the nuts of the torque converter.
On the top of the post you will see the error codes that I got,it was the output speed sensor (P0720 If I remember correctly) and then oil pressure something.
I would suggest not buying any more parts for the CVT until you have the whole thing taken apart and determined what exactly broke or else you may end up finding that you should have just bought another transmission. On that note, you should also try to source a used (working) transmission as a fallback plan in case you find your car's CVT not repairable (or worth repairing).
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
The socket for the torque converter nuts, I may have used a breaker bar on it, I don't remember. It was ground at the end then small lathe turned a little bit, the idea is to make the flats fairly sharp and square as the nuts are very thin, if you round them off you will then have to mess things up to get it off. They are very tight, and when reinstalling they do not need to be more than I think 30 foot pounds torque, and use blue thread locker, never use red on anything you ever wish to get apart again. Unless you can heat it to I think 400 degrees F.
So this socket is a 1/2 drive 14 mm.

View attachment 54055 View attachment 54056
Thank you for your input,so I got a decent breaker bar today and the same socket.
So after work I tried to remove those nuts...bloody hel that nuts is so over tight and only the last one was a bugger,so I messed it up😒 so now I need to figure out how to remove that last one.
I am going anyway replace those with new ones when I put it all together just to be safe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #40 ·
I would suggest not buying any more parts for the CVT until you have the whole thing taken apart and determined what exactly broke or else you may end up finding that you should have just bought another transmission. On that note, you should also try to source a used (working) transmission as a fallback plan in case you find your car's CVT not repairable (or worth repairing).
I will not because most of the parts I need to import,like I did with CVT belt from USA.
I was looking for one in my country, South Africa and was way too expensive it was cheaper to import.
 
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