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My 2009 Nissan Murano LE has 180,000 miles. I bought it used with 170,000 miles. Now my transmission is failing. I get stuck on hills. It is sometimes scary as I have to roll back,... My "Service Engine Soon" light comes off and on. The auto repair shop says I need a NEW transmission at $4,000. Has anyone gotten a junkyard transmission and replaced it more cheaply? Not all repair shops will do that. Is it worth it? The cars interior/exterior looks good. It is just the transmission under the hood that is causing problems. How many miles more will my 2009 Nissan Murano AWD LE last? Help!
 

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There is a decision to be made.

Check alternate sources, but no rebuild parts are available, so it's used or replacement new.

$4000 is high if it does not include all labor. If it does, it may be about right.

The decision is yours. $4000 is a lot less than a new car. If you plan to drive it for a few years and the car is in very good condition otherwise, it might very well be worth repairing.
 

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How many miles can the 2009 Murano AWD LE last? I am at 180K. My Seattle Nissan Dealership offered me $2500 for it if I bought one of their used/off the lease newer Muranos. Otherwise how much could I get if I sold it for parts? Money is tight especially with the CoronoVirus. And I need a new roof....
 

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How many miles can the 2009 Murano AWD LE last? I am at 180K. My Seattle Nissan Dealership offered me $2500 for it if I bought one of their used/off the lease newer Muranos. Otherwise how much could I get if I sold it for parts? Money is tight especially with the CoronoVirus. And I need a new roof....
You want my honest answer? At 180K I'd take the deal. Selling parts isn't your business - and you can't afford to have a disabled car in the driveway or yard, if you start parting one out. I'm not aware of many Muranos on this forum that have made it past 200K miles.
 

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I agree that 180k is high enough mileage that even if you replace the transmission, you are bound to have other problems with the car aside from the tranny. Average costs for the replacement with labor is around $5000 with labor. Think the book says 18hr of labor involved, which is what they would gauge an quote for the work on. $2500 is a good deal, though not sure what you payed for it. I'd recommend not purchasing something with that high of mileage especially a cvt transmission vehicle.
 

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Why don't Murano's last long?? I bought my 2009 Murano LE AWD with 170K miles. Was hoping to keep it until 200K miles. My 1999 Nissan Maxima lasted 20 years with 200K miles with not much expensive upkeep---and NO transmission problem. Can someone explain? I am disappointed with the 2009 Murano. And wonder if I should bother with another? What years are good/less problematical? I do not have the money to buy new.
 

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The 2009 was the first generation of murano and the cvt transmission is known for being weak and prone to failure. Everytime a cvt gets replaced, the old one can be sent back to nissan for a core charge they will pay you for it. They research what went wrong to try to learn from any mistakes in design and build. They use this information to make a better car in the next generation. We are at 3rd generation at this point. All this to say, that I didnt mean to suggest the murano would not last the 200k your looking to get out of it. It's just once any car gets up there in miles theres higher potential for any part to fail even after you would replace the transmission. I believe nissan partnered with Renault and Mitsubishi back in 99 and may or may not have started finding ways to make vehicles cheaper.
 

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Pure opinion, based on seeing many cars over the past 50 years. If you want a vehicle to go the most miles, buy proven technology and a proven configuration:
  • Engine in front, oriented north-south. Straight 6 or V8 is better than 4, because it's not working as hard as a 4.
  • Manual transmission or conventional automatic.
  • RWD, or sturdy AWD transfer case separate from the transmission.
  • Minimum number of optional electronics and accessories to fail.
Going over 200K miles will result in the need for repairs including starters, alternators, water pumps and other parts, possibly including a transmission rebuild. In a manual transmission car, you'll replace a clutch by that mileage. But repairs are less expensive on proven technology that has been used on many cars.

My sister's Toyota Tacoma is at 395,000 miles, and it's not alone. That vehicle typically goes over 300K miles with reasonable repairs and maintenance.
 

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This model of CVT, which was introduced in '03, was well into it's 5th redesign by time the '09 year model came out. Currently this model CVT is on something like it's 12th redesign, based on documented design weaknesses.

I believe that with proper maintenance, the newest CVTs will last 200k miles, comparable to standard auto transmissions.

Have a good day.
 
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