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Some advice. There is some very tricky stuff during the rebuild process. Especially dealing with the variators, it is also a good idea to go with the pins instead of the balls in the variators. I ended up reusing the old variator piston seal rings since the replacements in the kit had horrible end laps that didn't want to seal very well at all. You will need a press to work on the variators. It is very easy during the install of the variator pistons to have them cock and do damage, like everything else bad design. Some videos show it as easy, nope. The forward and reverse clutches do not wear much. The transfer gear bearings are almost unobtainium you have to match them to similar bearings, that is if they are bad mine were. If it is out even the transfer case should be resealed, if it is similar to the 2004 model there is a very nasty internal seal that we made a special tool to install it, it requires a certain distance from the end of the shaft down in a so many inches or mm I forget the dimension.
Check out this thread with a video of the transfer case reseal process:

 

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Yeah that is what a 2017? The 2004 is a bit different, not sure what yours is like. There is an inner seal in the long ring gear tube on mine that has to be seated at a certain distance, it is a double seal, to seal in both directions, and very easy to mess it up with out a proper install tool. And it also would be easy to goof it up installing the stub axle that goes to the bearing support that attaches to the engine.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 · (Edited)
So a quick update - I replaced the valve body over the weekend. It seems to have resolved the issues mentioned - no more jerking, no more not accelerating, etc. I did notice that the ratio control valve was stuck in the old valve body. I would imagine that was causing a lot of the issues she was having.
The only issue I have now is that it's acting like it has a stall converter from a dead stop - ie, there's a lockup delay that causes the car to jerk hard when it catches after a split second. It only happens from a dead stop, and it happens in D/L/R. If you ease into the throttle slowly, it doesn't happen. I'm thinking this is due to low fluid ; I put 6 quarts back in it when I put it back together, and I'm wondering if that's low.
I can't seem to find any information on actually reading the trans dipstick ; it has "HOT" on it way above the crosshatches, so I'm not sure if the crosshatches are for reading it cold , and it should be up near "HOT" (no marks, only the word "HOT" above two bends in the stick) when hot?
 

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So a quick update - I replaced the valve body over the weekend. It seems to have resolved the issues mentioned - no more jerking, no more not accelerating, etc. I did notice that the ratio control valve was stuck in the old valve body. I would imagine that was causing a lot of the issues she was having.
The only issue I have now is that it's acting like it has a stall converter from a dead stop - ie, there's a lockup delay that causes the car to jerk hard when it catches after a split second. It only happens from a dead stop, and it happens in D/L/R. If you ease into the throttle slowly, it doesn't happen. I'm thinking this is due to low fluid ; I put 6 quarts back in it when I put it back together, and I'm wondering if that's low.
I can't seem to find any information on actually reading the trans dipstick ; it has "HOT" on it way above the crosshatches, so I'm not sure if the crosshatches are for reading it cold , and it should be up near "HOT" (no marks, only the word "HOT" above two bends in the stick) when hot?
At operating temperature, the level should be between the cross-hatches but not more or less (preferably right in the middle).

Did you transfer the ROM assembly from your original valve body over to the new valve body? This is important because there's calibration data that the TCM initially gets from each pressure solenoid and driveability issues could result if there's a mismatch between the data in the TCM and what the actual calibration data is. The other option if you have a sufficiently-advanced scan tool is to erase the data in the TCM and it will automatically copy the calibration data from the solenoids in the currently-installed valve body.

Rectangle Font Circle Number Paper
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
At operating temperature, the level should be between the cross-hatches but not more or less (preferably right in the middle).

Did you transfer the ROM assembly from your original valve body over to the new valve body? This is important because there's calibration data that the TCM initially gets from each pressure solenoid and driveability issues could result if there's a mismatch between the data in the TCM and what the actual calibration data is. The other option if you have a sufficiently-advanced scan tool is to erase the data in the TCM and it will automatically copy the calibration data from the solenoids in the currently-installed valve body.

View attachment 55465
Yes, I transferred the ROM over from the old valve body. Thanks for the info on the dipstick; do you know what the significance of the “HOT” marking is?
 

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do you know what the significance of the “HOT” marking is?
Don't know for sure, but my guess is it's stamped there to alert whoever is reading the dipstick that the measurement should be taken on a "hot" (rather than cold) engine.
 

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Yes Hot is where the fluid level is when it is at operating temperature. In other words if you just drained it while it was cold you don't want to fill it to the HOT line, then when it gets hot it will be too high.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Yes Hot is where the fluid level is when it is at operating temperature. In other words if you just drained it while it was cold you don't want to fill it to the HOT line, then when it gets hot it will be too high.
But that doesn't make sense, because the word "HOT" is literaly 3-4" higher up the stick than the hash marks... I can't imagine it would thin out enough to rise that high...
 

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It's plain and simple!

On flat and level ground, engine running.

At temp, like after at least a 10-minute drive, the CVT fluid level should be somewhere in the middle of the hash marks.

At temp, anywhere within the range of the hash marks is an acceptable fluid level. If it's over the hash marks, fluid needs to be drained and if lower than the hash marks then fluid needs to be added.

This is not something that has to be overthought.

This rule applies to all dip sticks when reading fluid levels. Checking fluid levels, whether hot or cold, running or off, that depends on the fluid being checked.

Have a good day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Well, I said issue resolved. I’m ready to set this car on fire. The trans issues are resolved, but during the test drive it threw a p0011. Great - changed the oil (she’s not great on maintenance), and that code went away. Drove it today, and after about 30 minutes, I was stopped at a red light. When the light turned, the car shuddered, and it BARELY made it through the light, eventually accelerating. Power steering seemed sluggish as well. Pulled codes, and it pulled basically every code available for the emissions system - Bank 1 and 2 front and rear O2, Evap, and both cats 😬
This car is gonna be the death of me. You can’t convince me the entire emissions system died at once.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Scratch that - the pressure control solenoid A code came back. Car drives fine over 15-20 mph, but it seems like when the trans gets hot, it’ll barely creep from a dead stop and shudders like it’s trying to lock up.
 
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