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Has anyone been idling for 10 min or more and had your traction control lights on the dash display come on? This has happened several times in the last 3 months. Usually I turn the car off and restart the traction control lights are off and I drive away. Today, instead of restarting, I put into drive and drive. Several minutes into driving and trying to accelerate, the car started hesitating and losing power causing the car to jerk like a new driver driving a manual car. So I pulled over and turned off car, waiting a minute then restarted and the hesitating stopped. I DO have a history of my check engine light always being on and the code is P101 for mass air flow sensor. I’ve alrwady replaced that a little over a year ago and the code came back within 3 months. Any advice Murano owners???
 

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Has anyone been idling for 10 min or more and had your traction control lights on the dash display come on? This has happened several times in the last 3 months. Usually I turn the car off and restart the traction control lights are off and I drive away. Today, instead of restarting, I put into drive and drive. Several minutes into driving and trying to accelerate, the car started hesitating and losing power causing the car to jerk like a new driver driving a manual car. So I pulled over and turned off car, waiting a minute then restarted and the hesitating stopped. I DO have a history of my check engine light always being on and the code is P101 for mass air flow sensor. I’ve alrwady replaced that a little over a year ago and the code came back within 3 months. Any advice Murano owners???
If the vehicle jerks while the ABS/VDC/TCS system is engaged then that's actually normal behavior. You have to find out why the system is engaging in the first place. Are you getting any trouble codes when the dash lights come on? FYI...most cheap scanners can't read ABS codes.

The other problem you cited is probably not related. When the ECM throws the P0101 code it's usually not the MAF sensor that's at fault. More likely, it's something else (e.g. a small vacuum leak somewhere).
 

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Hey Coffee! Thanks so much for sharing that info. I am certain the MAF sensor is my main issue as I stated the code that continuously comes up is always P0101. The traction control lights are a completely new issue. As I also mentioned, I replaced the MAF sensor and after a few months the check engine light came back on with same code. I took my car to a reputable repair shop and explained I replaced sensor. They asked if it was a Nissan part. I said no. They said that could be the issue. Nissans only like Nissan parts, unlike Fords, Chevy, etc. I don't know how true that is, but they quoted me getting a Nissan sensor and then bringing in a Nissan mechanic to "reset" the sensor. What are your thoughts on this. It was going to be about $700 for part and labor.
 

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Hey Coffee! Thanks so much for sharing that info. I am certain the MAF sensor is my main issue as I stated the code that continuously comes up is always P0101. The traction control lights are a completely new issue. As I also mentioned, I replaced the MAF sensor and after a few months the check engine light came back on with same code. I took my car to a reputable repair shop and explained I replaced sensor. They asked if it was a Nissan part. I said no. They said that could be the issue. Nissans only like Nissan parts, unlike Fords, Chevy, etc. I don't know how true that is, but they quoted me getting a Nissan sensor and then bringing in a Nissan mechanic to "reset" the sensor. What are your thoughts on this. It was going to be about $700 for part and labor.
What specifically did you check before replacing the sensor and what aftermarket brand sensor did you use?

While it is true that OEM parts will generally be of the highest quality, which is why they're much more expensive than aftermarket, saying that "Nissans only like Nissan parts" is B.S.
 

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After getting an oil change at Dobbs a local reputable repair shop, I noticed the check engine light was on. I went right back and asked them to check it. They told me the code it was giving was the P0101. I looked that up and when I saw it was MAF sensor, I bought the replacement from Rock Auto. I watched a YouTube video on replacing it and had my friend help me install it. As you can probably tell by my message, I’m a woman that is trying to gather info and make the fix myself to save money (within reason). So after replacing the MAF sensor and resetting the codes, a few months later the check engine light came back on and gave same code. I went back to Dobbs and they couldn’t find anything else wrong other than saying it could be the sensor I replaced that since it’s aftermarket it didn’t fix the problem and Nissans like Nissan parts.
 

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One other thing I did was add fueling cleaner to my gas tank and that made the check engine light go off for a few months. I’ve repeated this process a few times, but I can’t imagine I need to keep putting Sea foam in my tank so often. I use clean gas from reputable gas stations that everyone else uses.
 

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Always keep in mind that just because a specific sensor is named in a trouble code description doesn't always mean that sensor is causing the fault. The ECM is programmed under the assumption that all components attached to the engine are in good condition. The ECM has no way of knowing that an intake manifold gasket is cracked, or the intake tubing has a hole in it, or the air filter is clogged with mud/debris, or that the exhaust has rusted through before an O2 sensor. Defects like these and many others can create conditions where the ECM detects that there is a problem, but is guessing what the problem is based on inputs received from various sensors and logic programmed into its software. This "guess" (which usually is expressed in a trouble code) may or may not be correct. That is, a trouble code is a starting point, not the end point. Many times you have to dig a little deeper to find what the root of the problem is.

The P0101 you pulled is a generic MAF sensor code that basically means the voltage signal the ECM is getting from the MAF sensor is not what it's expecting given the load on the engine. There are many extraneous things aside from a defective MAF sensor that can trigger that code such as unmetered air getting into the engine, obstructions in the intake tubing, or even an improperly seated air filter can cause this fault. The wiring to the sensor itself could be the issue. Years ago, some Nissan models (not the Murano) were even throwing that code because of a software glitch so the ECM had to be reprogrammed by the dealership. Even a sticky throttle plate has been cited as a reason for that code (see for example this video from a Nissan tech--same car as yours:
).

Now, the new MAF sensor you installed may very well have been bad right out of the box, but before you fork over $700 to a shop at least try to do a few things to rule out the other common causes that can result in this code. For example, check the intake shroud that goes from above the radiator back to the airbox to make sure it's clear. Check the air filter and make sure it's not dirty and that it's seated properly in the airbox. Remove the rubber intake tubing going from the air filter box back to the engine (throttle body) and inspect it closely, even bend it in different positions--see if you find any cracks/holes anywhere on it. Also, check all the rubber vacuum hoses attached to the front and back of the intake manifold (including the one that runs down to the front engine mount) and make sure they're in good condition and that they're not loose/disconnected. If you're not quite sure what I mean, go on YouTube and watch some videos on finding vacuum leaks and you'll soon figure out what you need to look for (and techniques to do it). The Seafoam observation is a coincidence (although not a bad idea to use a good fuel system cleaner periodically).

Good luck and let us know how it works out!
 

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Thanks so much for all of that info! I will definitely take your advice and start watching the videos and then start looking for leaks, etc.
 
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