Nissan Murano Forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
my 2011 Nissan Murano at times does not accelerate while on a long hill stretch, and occasionally the cabin has the smell of burning clutch.... how can I resolve this challenge?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,441 Posts
my 2011 Nissan Murano at times does not accelerate while on a long hill stretch, and occasionally the cabin has the smell of burning clutch.... how can I resolve this challenge?
Start by having it scanned for error codes. Be sure the scanner used can read Nissan CVT error codes.

Do you hear any unusual noises that occur at the same time it's having the issue? How many miles/kilometers are on it? What is the temperature at the time, and how long and high is the hilly stretch?

I recommend the Android app CVTz50. It can read both engine and CVT error codes, many scanners cannot read Nissan CVT error codes:
 
  • Like
Reactions: I need coffee

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
my 2011 Nissan Murano at times does not accelerate while on a long hill stretch, and occasionally the cabin has the smell of burning clutch.... how can I resolve this challenge?
Uuum, sell of selling clutch. Take the advice of the previous post.
But, I would what is the milage of the vehicle? Have you had any maintenance done on the transmission (my suspect)? Note: you have TWO (2) transmission fluid filters. Pan filter (my '11 has a metal screen) & the IN-LINE cooler filter --this one is usually over looked!
If it is still running & you want to "potentially "save it. Here's what I would make sure you do (but here'swhat suspect--in-line filter clugged or OLD fluid--very old!: --change your xmission fluid (11,5 quarts approximately), remove & clean
the pan filter & pan housing, magnet (important because it tells you how bad materials of the clutches are collected), AND the in line fluid filter (in my 2011 it looks like a metal fuel filter located on the driver's side wheel well seen by removing the plastic covers), use Nissan genuine fluid! Note it does make a difference to using Nissan fluid.
If it is saveble...
I would clean all hoses by back pressure (with air) to assure you don't have a clogged hose. (Note only on the hoses, not intothe transmission, by removing them).
You have oil in the pan, pumped into the water to transmission fluid exchanger (I replaced all those hoses (both the water and fluid hoses), then going into the radiator xmission cooler, then back I believe into the EXTERNAL fluid filter, then back into the the transission.
What i did was removal of pan (drain) used sealant & put back (after cleaning), cleaned all external hoses with compressed air, replaced external filter, put 6-7 quarts of NEW fluid, removed the hose RETURNING into the transmission, putting that hose into container, started the motor & kept putting new oil into the fill neck until NEW (clean fluid) started to come out (you needan assistant). Then stopped the engine reconnected the hose to the transmission (tighten), verified fluid levels. Verified after hot engine (don't over fill). Drive until hot normal temperature & verify levels in hot temp settings and verify for leaks.
Drive for a while and then go to the areas of hills and high speed test.
This is a know problem with the pre 2011 models that Nissan stated to use an external transmission fluid cooler--because itbover heated in hot areas (90+ degrees & highway high speeds). But sometimes a complete total transmission fluid change AND filter change may do the trick. But, and this is a big but--use said you smell burnt clutch...
If this doesn't do it? Well have it well checked.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,369 Posts
my 2011 Nissan Murano at times does not accelerate while on a long hill stretch, and occasionally the cabin has the smell of burning clutch.... how can I resolve this challenge?
Just for clarity - is your Murano equipped with a manual transmission? I see that you're not in the US, but I'm not sure where the Murano may have been equipped with a manual. It was not offered that way in the US.

If a clutch is slipping, it's easy to determine - drive up a hill, accelerate hard in lower gears and see if the engine speeds up without a matching increase in speed. You can feel the difference, and you know the clutch is slipping. It usually cannot be felt in the highest gears, only first and second.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top