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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Several weeks ago i went for a mountain bike ride like normal, opening the rear hatch and closing it before heading out. I don't know if it didn't close totally or what, but i came back and opened the hatch and that is when my issue first started (i think). None of the buttons would close start the motor closing. I pushed the door closed, but the motor wouldn't engage to pull it closed. I couldn't push it closed, either.

I got home and got to the manual release and could then get the door to latch by pushing it closed, but none of the motorized functions will work. If i want to open the door i have to use the manual release.

I've checked all the buttons on the dash and the power lift function is on, but none of the buttons will open the door. The fuse in the engine tested as fine.

The button that locks/unlocks on the rear hatch will lock/unlock the other four doors, but nothing happens with the rear door (no clicks or thuds or anything like that).

Reading around the internet makes me think it's the lock actuator but i admit to not knowing how to test that. I've got a voltage meter and have removed the interior door panel, but i don't know which part of the mechanism to test.

Does anyone have any other thoughts about what it could be and/or things to test? I'm also struggling to figure out which part i might need. I'm not the most mechanically inclined, but would like to try to avoid going to the dealer if i can.

thanks
 

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Any time an electrical component doesn't work, check fuses first.
 

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thanks. I did check one in the engine compartment labeled for the lift gate (pink, 30A maybe?) and it looked and tested fine using a meter. Is there another one that is involved (so far this is the only electrical issue i've noticed)?
Same issue on my 2011 LE. I checked the 30amp fuse in the engine compartment, and it was good. Removed and reseated, but did not resolve the issue. I then removed, checked and reseated the 10a fuses (positions #3 and #6) within the passenger compartment (lower left drivers side). Both were good, but after reseating, the liftgate began to work again. Hope this helps someone.
 

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Same issue on my 2011 LE. I checked the 30amp fuse in the engine compartment, and it was good. Removed and reseated, but did not resolve the issue. I then removed, checked and reseated the 10a fuses (positions #3 and #6) within the passenger compartment (lower left drivers side). Both were good, but after reseating, the liftgate began to work again. Hope this helps someone.
Just be aware that this "fix" may only be temporary. There are a number of conditions that will cause the Automatic Back Door Control Unit to go into fail-safe mode where the door will no longer operate until the unit is reset either via clearing trouble codes or disconnecting the battery. Fuse #6 powers that unit so removing and re-seating fuse #6 basically does the same thing as disconnecting the battery. If the underlying fault that caused the fail-safe condition is detected again the back door will probably stop working again.

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the reply.

I had this issue happen a few more times and have figured out that the easiest thing to do to resolve it is to reset the computer. It's what the dealer would do. In fact, i was waiting for them to check it the second time and the service manager made an off-hand comment about resetting the computer. I ran outside, popped the negative, waited a few seconds and put it on and the lift gate worked again.

It's a terrible design, but my solution is now to just pop the battery terminal and deal with having to reset my clock and automatic window function after.

Now that i own a code scanner i'll see if it shows anything the next time since that might be easier than resetting the computer manually.
 

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It's a terrible design, but my solution is now to just pop the battery terminal and deal with having to reset my clock and automatic window function after.
Wouldn't it be easier and quicker to just pull the # 6 fuse? Then you wouldn't have to reset everything else.

Get a small, curved needle-nosed pliers to pull the fuse. The angle that the fuse box is at under the dash makes using a regular fuse puller impossible.

Have a good day.
 

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Wouldn't it be easier and quicker to just pull the # 6 fuse? Then you wouldn't have to reset everything else.

Get a small, curved needle-nosed pliers to pull the fuse. The angle that the fuse box is at under the dash makes using a regular fuse puller impossible.

Have a good day.
What size small curved pliers? I want to get just the right ones.

My only experience with pulling a fuse was not pleasant... It was the BCM fuse located in the bottom right of the fuse box, it's probably one of the most difficult to pull/insert due to the piss-poor design of the fuse box.

Here's what I posted after my experience:
 

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Something like this:

EZRED KWP2 Kiwi Bent Head Needle-Nose Pliers, Set of 2 (2 Pack) - - Amazon.com

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Use the short 1-1/2" version, and you'll have to use it upside down instead of as show in the pic due to our layout.

You might find them cheaper elsewhere, but I have found these style pliers very helpful in tight places. Be careful, they exert more force than what you'd think and can easily crack a plastic fuse.

Mine are ground at the ends just a little to make them a smaller to fit in the narrow gap between the fuses a little easier.

Have a good day.
 
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Something like this:

EZRED KWP2 Kiwi Bent Head Needle-Nose Pliers, Set of 2 (2 Pack) - - Amazon.com

View attachment 55969

Use the short 1-1/2" version, and you'll have to use it upside down instead of as show in the pic due to our layout.

You might find them cheaper elsewhere, but I have found these style pliers very helpful in tight places. Be careful, they exert more force than what you'd think and can easily crack a plastic fuse.

Mine are ground at the ends just a little to make them a smaller to fit in the narrow gap between the fuses a little easier.

Have a good day.
Perfect, many thanks!

I like the fact that they can grip good enough to crack the plastic. When I used straight conventional needle nose pliers they would slip and the fuse would pivot out of position on the hard plastic no matter how I tried to grip the fuse...

They look like the perfect tool for the job. I'll keep them in the car, I would hate to be on the side of road trying to change a fuse using the supplied fuse puller. It's far too easy to drop a fuse into the abys... I now carry a large assortment of fuses in case I drop a few. They are ridiculously tiny...
 

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Something like this:

EZRED KWP2 Kiwi Bent Head Needle-Nose Pliers, Set of 2 (2 Pack) - - Amazon.com

View attachment 55969

Use the short 1-1/2" version, and you'll have to use it upside down instead of as show in the pic due to our layout.

You might find them cheaper elsewhere, but I have found these style pliers very helpful in tight places. Be careful, they exert more force than what you'd think and can easily crack a plastic fuse.

Mine are ground at the ends just a little to make them a smaller to fit in the narrow gap between the fuses a little easier.

Have a good day.
Just got these. Nice quality tool, I will find them useful. I got them for $20 on Amazon, very reasonable for 2 pliers.

I tried seeing how they would work. It would grip the middle fuses okay. However, like like you mentioned, they are quite thick so I will need to grind down the ends to grip the fuses in the upper and lower areas and to fit into the very narrow gap. Incredibly stupid design fuse box design IMO... It's not easy access at all...

Can you post a photo showing your pliers ground down?
 

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Just got these. Nice quality tool, I will find them useful. I got them for $20 on Amazon, very reasonable for 2 pliers.

I tried seeing how they would work. It would grip the middle fuses okay. However, like like you mentioned, they are quite thick so I will need to grind down the ends to grip the fuses in the upper and lower areas and to fit into the very narrow gap. Incredibly stupid design fuse box design IMO... It's not easy access at all...

Can you post a photo showing your pliers ground down?
I'll find the one I ground down and post a pic of it.

I ground down both tips to about 1/4", which fits in between the fuses. You only need to grind them back about 1/4" also.

Have a good day.
 
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I'll find the one I ground down and post a pic of it.

I ground down both tips to about 1/4", which fits in between the fuses. You only need to grind them back about 1/4" also.

Have a good day.
Awesome, thanks!
 

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Came across this today and remembered that I was going to post a photo. It could be ground down a little bit more, but this now does fit better between the fuses.
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Have a good day.
 
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Thanks!

Neat grinding job!
Courtesy of my 50+ year-old Sears bench grinder. Can't kill it. New wheel and wire brush now and then and still working like new.

If you see one at a tag sale, grab it. Usually goes for $5 - $10. It will save you a lot of filing and the brush is great for cleaning off surface rust, and gunk from bolt threads when cleaning up.

Have a good day.
 

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Courtesy of my 50+ year-old Sears bench grinder. Can't kill it. New wheel and wire brush now and then and still working like new.

If you see one at a tag sale, grab it. Usually goes for $5 - $10. It will save you a lot of filing and the brush is great for cleaning off surface rust, and gunk from bolt threads when cleaning up.

Have a good day.
Great tip, I'll be on the lookout for one!

It's amazing how some things last so long, even with lots of use. My Toro 824 PowerShift snow thrower is still going strong after 26 years removing snow from my 225' long driveway. My driveways is also 26 years old and some parts are crumbling, and there are dips and cracks. None of this has stopped my Toro, even when hitting the cracks hard sometimes, and a couple of occasions of ingesting a chunk of pavement. It has never even flinched, and has never broken a shear pin. Over the years I've all I have done is changed the oil, replace one control cable, and the 2 belts (changed proactively, they were still okay), as well as the skid shoes a couple of years ago.

However, I have been changing over to battery operated tools over the last several years. They work great! The only gas tools I have left are my power washer, snow thrower, and wood chipper. I also have a generator, no battery option other than solar for it... It is dual fuel though, so I run it on propane when most of time.

So, rationalizing my snow thrower is getting older, I splurged for a new Toro e26 AH battery powered snow thrower. Still waiting for enough snow to use it... I'll keep my old gas Toro as a backup, used snow throwers don't sell for much... I figure it's a good to have as a backup, plus it has parts that would also work on my new Toro. The newer skid shoes alone cost about what I could sell my old snow thrower for used... The new Toro e26 a conventional snow thrower, but with an electric motor. I figure based on the longevity of my current Toro, Toro really knows how to make a tough long lasting snow thrower. This one is not built quite as stout as my old one, but I don't need it to last over 26 years, I'd be in my nineties then...

Toro e26 AH Snow Thrower
 

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Let me know how that sucker works out once it's seen some snow. A little expensive, but it certainly seems up to the task after reading thru the specs.

My 20+ year old electric start Toro is still going strong. Already flipped the skids once and have a new bottom scrapper to install before the next big storm.

Have a good day.
 

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Yeah, all snow throwers are more expensive now...

The Toro Power Max e26 AH is the same as the Toro Power Max 826 OAE, except for the electric motor. The e26 is $500 more expensive, but also comes with heated handgrips, the gas one doesn't. Batteries are the main reason for the extra cost, you can buy the bare tool version of the e26 for $500 less if you already have batteries from your lawn mower, etc.

Looks like a chance of a good storm over the next couple of days. I have 90 days to return it if it doesn't perform to the specifications. I've done a ton of research, so I expect to perform. I'll let you know...

This guy has the best YouTube snow thrower reviews:


You can see the e26 in action around the 14:50 mark, the audio doesn't kick in for several minutes, so check out how it sounds:


I apologize for hijacking the thread...
 
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