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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
2012 Nissan Murano SL; 136,000 miles

Did not previously have any problems, but started having some while on a long road trip recently. On day two of driving a couple hours, I noticed that the car stopped shifting from drive to overdrive once at speeds over 65 mph. The first time this happened we stopped, got gas, checked fluids and fuses, etc. The stop took 20 minutes or so, got back on the road and all was well for another 90 minutes or so and then it stopped wanting to shift out again at higher speeds. I decided to push it a bit harder and check engine light came on and AC cut out (we can come back around to that). We stopped and did a quick on/off to see if it would reset again and no luck. Looked up closest auto parts store to get code read and went there. Codes were C1155 (left front wheel speed sensor input circuit failure) and P1778 (transmission reverse I/P circuit). Did not reset codes and drove car on backroads to nearest Nissan dealer a little over an hour away; had to do short section of highway and again had no problems. Dealer did diagnosis and wanted to replace transmission, compressor (no power to it), and a bunch of unrelated mechanical items (e.g., front control arms). We opted to not have the repairs done and instead drove the car nearly two hours to a friends house to be shipped home for further troubleshooting and repair. The dealer had cleared the codes and I did not have any issues during the drive other than the A/C still not working.

So, now the car is home and I am looking for recommendations on what to look at in order to fix the car. I am not actually convinced that there is a transmission or A/C compressor issue, but more of an electrical system problem. I was curious if just replacing the wheel speed sensor may be step one in order to ensure that proper speed data is being sent to the transmission for shifting. It appears that wheel sensors for this model range in price from $12 to $400, so it's unclear what is actually needed. The dealer claimed that the wheel sensor was actually INSIDE the transmission which is just one reason why we opted to have them do nothing since I knew that was a lie. The dealer also claimed that the A/C compressor needed replaced because it had no power. If that's the case, it would seem to me that the upstream relay or IDPM in the case of this car should be investigated first before replacing the compressor. It just seems very suspicious to me that both the transmission and A/C, which are not related, began having issues at exactly the same moment.

Thanks in advance for the advice and help. I appreciate it!
 

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Codes were C1155 (left front wheel speed sensor input circuit failure)
Nissan defines this code for low brake fluid level. Are you sure it wasn't C1104 or C1108 if it did pertain to the front LH sensor? Is your ABS light on?

The dealer claimed that the wheel sensor was actually INSIDE the transmission which is just one reason why we opted to have them do nothing since I knew that was a lie.
There is a primary and secondary speed sensor in the transmission (secondary is mounted on the outside), but if it was a C-prefix trouble code then it is one of the wheel speed sensors mounted near the wheels.

The dealer also claimed that the A/C compressor needed replaced because it had no power. If that's the case, it would seem to me that the upstream relay or IDPM in the case of this car should be investigated first before replacing the compressor.
Presumably, they would have done this as part of their diagnostics. Nevertheless, run the Auto-Active test in the attached PDF document and see if the IPDM is capable of actuating the A/C clutch independent of all the other inputs in the A/C system.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you for the information!

Nissan defines this code for low brake fluid level. Are you sure it wasn't C1104 or C1108 if it did pertain to the front LH sensor? Is your ABS light on?
I have attached the AutoZone and dealer reports for reference. I really wished that I would have had my own code reader with me (an extra has already been purchased and put in the car!). The AutoZone report stated C1155 for the sensor, P1778 for the transmission, and also listed P0868. ABS light was not on and currently no lights are on.

Presumably, they would have done this as part of their diagnostics. Nevertheless, run the Auto-Active test in the attached PDF document and see if the IPDM is capable of actuating the A/C clutch independent of all the other inputs in the A/C system.
I would have hoped so, but they were not able or were unwilling to really explain what was actually done and how. It was very frustrating. It is supposed to stop raining later today and I will give the procedure you provided a try. Thanks!
 

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Thank you for the information!


I have attached the AutoZone and dealer reports for reference. I really wished that I would have had my own code reader with me (an extra has already been purchased and put in the car!). The AutoZone report stated C1155 for the sensor, P1778 for the transmission, and also listed P0868. ABS light was not on and currently no lights are on.


I would have hoped so, but they were not able or were unwilling to really explain what was actually done and how. It was very frustrating. It is supposed to stop raining later today and I will give the procedure you provided a try. Thanks!
Autozone is using generic trouble code translations. Here is how Nissan defines the codes you pulled (two are transmission-related).

C1155: Brake Fluid Level Low
P0868: Transmission Fluid Pressure Low
P1778: Stepper Motor Circuit Intermittent

The last two codes are not promising. Have you checked the CVT fluid level to make sure it's within specification? There is a specific procedure for this in the service manual for your car linked below (see the "Maintenance" file).

BTW, I noticed that the dealership also recommended resealing the transfer case. Is it leaking? Do you see any oil on the underside of the engine and transmission (particularly the latter)?

https://www.nicoclub.com/nissan-service-manuals
 
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Autozone is using generic trouble code translations. Here is how Nissan defines the codes you pulled (two are transmission-related).

C1155: Brake Fluid Level Low
P0868: Transmission Fluid Pressure Low
P1778: Stepper Motor Circuit Intermittent


The last two codes are not promising. Have you checked the CVT fluid level to make sure it's within specification? There is a specific procedure for this in the service manual for your car linked below (see the "Maintenance" file).

BTW, I noticed that the dealership also recommended resealing the transfer case. Is it leaking? Do you see any oil on the underside of the engine and transmission (particularly the latter)?

https://www.nicoclub.com/nissan-service-manuals
This isn't good to see in a CVT
P0868: Transmission Fluid Pressure Low
P1778: Stepper Motor Circuit Intermittent

There may be internal damage already in terms of the transmission actuating or potentially already failed.

I can only speak from experience that those get thrown when there is a mechanical issue internally.
 
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This isn't good to see in a CVT
P0868: Transmission Fluid Pressure Low
P1778: Stepper Motor Circuit Intermittent

There may be internal damage already in terms of the transmission actuating or potentially already failed.

I can only speak from experience that those get thrown when there is a mechanical issue internally.
YMMV... @Cryogenix1 was seeing those codes in his 1st gen for years and the CVT outlasted the engine in the end. Nevertheless, those codes do warrant attention.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
@I need coffee ... I ran the diagnostic test today and all seemed to check out, but unsure of the A/C compressor since the clicks were very faint. Not sure how loud they are expected to be.

CVT fluid level looks okay per the referenced procedure in the manual to check it.
New Bonus Problem: Lock tab on the CVT Fluid Check stick cap broke right off when I pressed it in to release the cap! Guess I'll have to add that to the parts list...

Attached is a picture of the transfer case seal leak that was mentioned.

Thanks!

53606

53607

53605
 

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It's leaking pretty good. The level on the dipstick is normal so if you haven't been filling the fluid then presumably the dealership tech did?

I would suggest the following:

- Do a few transmission oil pan drain/refills spaced at least a few days apart until the fluid on the dipstick is clear. Be sure to use CVT fluid that says "NS-2" on the label. Then do another one, but also drop the transmission oil pan and clean it out (along with the magnets) and also remove the filter attached to the valve body and clean it out. Depending on how much debris you find, it will give you a decent indication of the shape the CVT is in.

- Change the gear oil in the transfer case and also measure the fluid that drains out--it holds a little over 300ml. The reason for this aside from putting fresh gear oil in is to make sure that it isn't leaking as well because if it is, you will probably have to suck it up and have it repaired since if it goes dry the transfer case will fail.

If it ends up just being a seepage leak from the CVT output shaft seal then you can just monitor the fluid level and make sure it's always within the hash area if you can tolerate the oil leaking on the underside of your car (and possibly garage/driveway). As far as the codes are concerned, clear them and see if any come back.

On the A/C compressor, you need to be certain that the IPDM is (or is not) actuating the clutch solenoid in order to determine what your next steps will be. Run the test again and shine a flashlight down where the compressor is and see if you can visually see the clutch moving when you hear the clicks. If you have to, raise the front end of the car and remove the wheel and splash guard (4 clips) and the compressor is right there. If the clutch is engaging then you have to figure out why the ECM is not sending the A/C request command to the IPDM.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The sub frame assembly part for my Subaru finally arrived this week after being backordered for two months, so I was able to get that swapped and can now return my focus to this...

Happy weekend! Thank you for the information and recommendations. I have never added transmission fluild and the dealer mentioned nothing about doing; only ran diagnostics.

I will pick up NS-2 transmission fluid and work through the changes you suggested. Also, looks like the replacement transmission pan gasket is part ##313971XD00/313971XE0A, correct? I will also look at the A/C compressor closer and see if I can make a determination on it.

For the CVT check cap, I was able to find that it's part 31086-JA00A. However, the part details state that it should be installed and used for checking the CVT fluid level only and not left in place all the time. However, the full cap and stick was in place on this Murano. Is there a different part number for just the cap without dipstick then? I have not been successful and locating that particular part number. Please advise, if possible. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Will also do the gear oil change and check the volume. If necessary, it doesn't sound like that gasket is really DIY?
 

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The sub frame assembly part for my Subaru finally arrived this week after being backordered for two months, so I was able to get that swapped and can now return my focus to this...

Happy weekend! Thank you for the information and recommendations. I have never added transmission fluild and the dealer mentioned nothing about doing; only ran diagnostics.

I will pick up NS-2 transmission fluid and work through the changes you suggested. Also, looks like the replacement transmission pan gasket is part ##313971XD00/313971XE0A, correct? I will also look at the A/C compressor closer and see if I can make a determination on it.

For the CVT check cap, I was able to find that it's part 31086-JA00A. However, the part details state that it should be installed and used for checking the CVT fluid level only and not left in place all the time. However, the full cap and stick was in place on this Murano. Is there a different part number for just the cap without dipstick then? I have not been successful and locating that particular part number. Please advise, if possible. Thanks.
If all you did was break the locking tab on the CVT dipstick, don't bother replacing it. Many others on these forums did the same thing--it's not going anywhere.

I don't believe you need to buy an OEM gasket for the CVT pan. Aftermarket should be fine (Mahle, Fel-Pro etc.).

The transfer case has a fill plug facing the passenger side that's a 12mm wrench size, but it's in a very tight spot. Most people use a deep offset wrench (at least 60 degrees--Harbor Freight sells a set). I use a ratcheting S wrench. The drain plug is right on the bottom of the transfer case and it's a 10mm hex bit. There's a how-to on the 1st generation forum and the procedure is pretty the same for the 2nd generation. Just make sure to lift the entire car so it's level. You'll find RTV on the threads of both, which you'll have to clean, but you have the option of using plumbers teflon tape instead (cleaner and easier to work with).

IMPORTANT: Do not drain the gear oil unless you can loosen the fill plug first or you may find yourself in quite the pickle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
If all you did was break the locking tab on the CVT dipstick, don't bother replacing it. Many others on these forums did the same thing--it's not going anywhere.

I don't believe you need to buy an OEM gasket for the CVT pan. Aftermarket should be fine (Mahle, Fel-Pro etc.).

The transfer case has a fill plug facing the passenger side that's a 12mm wrench size, but it's in a very tight spot. Most people use a deep offset wrench (at least 60 degrees--Harbor Freight sells a set). I use a ratcheting S wrench. The drain plug is right on the bottom of the transfer case and it's a 10mm hex bit. There's a how-to on the 1st generation forum and the procedure is pretty the same for the 2nd generation. Just make sure to lift the entire car so it's level. You'll find RTV on the threads of both, which you'll have to clean, but you have the option of using plumbers teflon tape instead (cleaner and easier to work with).

IMPORTANT: Do not drain the gear oil unless you can loosen the fill plug first or you may find yourself in quite the pickle.
Okay, good to know about the dip stick. I just wasn't sure if the lock was needed since it had one unlike many of the others.

The ridiculous rainstorms and heat waves seem to be easing here now, so I plan to start the transmission fluid flushes this weekend. Going to check the transfer case refill plug, too, and then head out and get the necessary fluids to start the process. Thanks again and I'll be in touch!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Forgot to provide an update. I picked up a 10 mm Allen socket for the transmission oil plug and changed in a couple days ago. No issues with that so far. I was surprised to see an O-ring on the plug rather than a crush washer, but maybe that was the standard for the 2012? I will drain again in a couple days and have a Fel-Pro 18755 gasket on the way for the third change with pan drop. Will update on the condition then.

I still need to investigate the transfer case fill plug before I do anything else with that.

As for the A/C, its pulley is spinning, but I cannot hear or see the clutch engage either when activating the A/C regularly or via the IPDM test.
 

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As for the A/C, its pulley is spinning, but I cannot hear or see the clutch engage either when activating the A/C regularly or via the IPDM test.
If you have a test light, connect it to a good ground, disconnect the harness connector from the A/C compressor coil and probe terminal #1 (white wire) of the wiring harness connector while running the IPDM Auto Active test. If it lights up when the test is run then the A/C coil is bad. If it doesn't light up then the problem would be either the wiring to the IPDM or the A/C clutch relay inside it (do you hear the relay in the IPDM click, but the clutch doesn't engage?).

53712
 
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If you have a test light, connect it to a good ground, disconnect the harness connector from the A/C compressor coil and probe terminal #1 (white wire) of the wiring harness connector while running the IPDM Auto Active test. If it lights up when the test is run then the A/C coil is bad. If it doesn't light up then the problem would be either the wiring to the IPDM or the A/C clutch relay inside it (do you hear the relay in the IPDM click, but the clutch doesn't engage?).

View attachment 53712
Thanks; I will look into this very soon and reply again. I am going to do the next transmission drain and fill, too.
 
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