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Purchased this car perhaps 5 months ago and then after 3,000 miles or so, check engine light came on. three codes appeared with one indicating a lean mix. My mechanic thinks the catalytic converter may be an issue. Took the car to a dealership and the intake boot (by the catalytic converter I assume) is torn. If this repair is completed, is it likely to correct these other codes; P0420, P0474 and P0011 which my mechanic said have to do with the catalytic converter, a com sensor and a lean mix?

Thanks,

Bill1836
 

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Purchased this car perhaps 5 months ago and then after 3,000 miles or so, check engine light came on. three codes appeared with one indicating a lean mix. My mechanic thinks the catalytic converter may be an issue. Took the car to a dealership and the intake boot (by the catalytic converter I assume) is torn. If this repair is completed, is it likely to correct these other codes; P0420, P0474 and P0011 which my mechanic said have to do with the catalytic converter, a com sensor and a lean mix?

Thanks,

Bill1836
For the P0474, are you sure it isn't P0174?
 

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I believe you are correct. Is a P0174.
P0011 – Camshaft position , bank 1 timing over-advanced
P0174 – System too lean, bank 2
P0420 – Catalytic converter system, bank 1 -efficiency below threshold

To answer your question, I would expect repairing the intake boot would take care of the P0174 assuming that is the only vector through which unmetered air is entering the engine. However, that repair will not likely address the underlying causes of the other codes.
 

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Hmmm. A local Nissan dealership wants $4335 for a timing chain replacement/repair, $1286 for leaking valve cover gaskets and new valve covers and $257 for a new intake boot (hose I guess). Bought my new used car around August 2019. I had no idea that the repairs were so many multiples over more normal repair costs. I believe there may be two catalytic converters that weren't quoted but are also at least double what they would run with a more normal cost structure. The car handles great, is super comfortable and fun to drive and shifts perfectly. I wonder if I just repaired the intake boot and left the timing chain for another day since the car accelerates and shifts perfectly if I would be harming anything??
 

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Hmmm. A local Nissan dealership wants $4335 for a timing chain replacement/repair, $1286 for leaking valve cover gaskets and new valve covers and $257 for a new intake boot (hose I guess). Bought my new used car around August 2019. I had no idea that the repairs were so many multiples over more normal repair costs. I believe there may be two catalytic converters that weren't quoted but are also at least double what they would run with a more normal cost structure. The car handles great, is super comfortable and fun to drive and shifts perfectly. I wonder if I just repaired the intake boot and left the timing chain for another day since the car accelerates and shifts perfectly if I would be harming anything??
The timing chain needs to be replaced on a 6 year-old car? How many miles does the car have? I think they're trying to take you for a ride. You can easily fix the intake boot yourself--OEM costs less than $100 online and you can find aftermarket boots on Amazon for less than $40. Change the boot and clear the codes. The P0174 will probably not come back. It might even help with the P0420--it is possible for a bad intake leak to cause that code, but it's typically something else like an exhaust leak between the upstream and downstream O2 sensors (or bad sensors) or a worn out catalytic converter. Nevertheless, you have to replace the boot anyway so just do it and see what happens.

The P0011 is unrelated to the intake leak. However, many people never know there's a problem except for the MIL turning on. Oftentimes, the underlying problem is poor engine maintenance (i.e. previous owner never/rarely changed the oil) so the solenoid valve that controls the oil pressure to the cam phasers to adjust intake timing gets clogged up. Some people swear by oil treatments (e.g. Seafoam), but without knowing the prior maintenance history of the engine those can have their own pitfalls.

BTW..Did the dealership explain why you also need new valve covers in addition to the valve cover gaskets? Did they say oil was found in the spark plug tubes?
 

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Hmmm. A local Nissan dealership wants $4335 for a timing chain replacement/repair, $1286 for leaking valve cover gaskets and new valve covers and $257 for a new intake boot (hose I guess). Bought my new used car around August 2019. I had no idea that the repairs were so many multiples over more normal repair costs. I believe there may be two catalytic converters that weren't quoted but are also at least double what they would run with a more normal cost structure. The car handles great, is super comfortable and fun to drive and shifts perfectly. I wonder if I just repaired the intake boot and left the timing chain for another day since the car accelerates and shifts perfectly if I would be harming anything??
Bill, I want to echo I Need Coffee's post.

Timing chains normally do not need replaced! Only timing belts. RUN AWAY from this place. Unless there is something unusual happening to the chain, they are lying to you. For your own peace of mind, I'd have another shop give you an opinion on the timing chain. There are 99 out of 100 chances that it's just fine.

And BTW, either they didn't explain their diagnosis well, or perhaps you left out some details. But in the case of this repair place, I wouldn't trust their explanation anyway.

The intake boot price is obscene. You can buy it for $50 or under, and change it yourself - I think there are only two hose clamps and one electrical disconnect on it. (There may be a bit more, but isn't a few minutes of work worth $200 to you??)

At this point, I think you should question EVERY repair suggestion the dealer made, go to a good indy shop and have them check things. And if the valve covers are leaking enough to matter, it will cost some $$ to replace them. Gaskets are one part, the valve covers are another. But if you just have a tiny leak, then you can pick your own time to have that repair done - my wife's BMW has had a small crack in a valve cover for two years and it doesn't leak enough to be worth repairing, even though I can do it myself. A leak isn't a crisis, it's often something to diagnose and monitor.
 

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boot (by the catalytic converter I assume) is torn. If this repair is completed, is it likely to correct these other codes; P0420, P0474 and P0011 which my mechanic said have to do with the catalytic converter, a com s auto clicker word unscrambler jumble solver ensor and a lean mix?
it likely to correct these other codes; P0420, P0474 and P0011 which my mechanic said have to do with the catalytic converter, a com sensor and a lean mix?
 

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it likely to correct these other codes; P0420, P0474 and P0011 which my mechanic said have to do with the catalytic converter, a com sensor and a lean mix?
Kitadita has been banned - it's probably a bot. Please disregard ANYTHING it posted.

Please backtrack to the posts by I Need Coffee and me and change your approach based on that information.

I've re-read this thread and I understand the comment about the "air intake boot" better. NO, it's not anything to do with the catalytic converters! It's the rubber hose between your air filter and the air intake on the engine. It's also prone to coming loose at one end or the other, and sometimes it develops holes which let air leaks confuse the air flow meter which is in the air intake system. When this happens, people often complain about poor throttle response and some trouble codes.

I suggest you open the hood, locate that intake air boot, and check the ends to see if either end is loose. No tools are needed for that. You can also squeeze it and see if you find any holes. Checking it is free.

And I hope you're looking for a different dealer or garage, as I don't trust anything the first one told you.
 
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