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I have a 2015 Murano Platinum that I purchased in November of 2015, now six and a half years ago. It has just 46,000 miles on it. If I’m honest, I’ve loved it. My son is a general auto technician and he’s helped me take very good care of my car. It didn’t need a whole lot more than oil changes and whatnot until last fall, when I was told it needed rear shocks and new tires. Not a surprise. A month or two ago I noticed it would occasionally do a weird hesitation thing where I would hit the gas and the engine would go, but the car would not, and it would just continue to coast. If I let completely off the gas and pressed the pedal again then everything was fine. I mentioned this to my son and he suggested I take it to an actual Nissan dealer and get a CVT transmission flush. I live in a rural area and the nearest Nissan dealer is 45 mins away, but it was the only way to be sure it was done right and actually flushed and not just drained and refilled. Before I could get a service appointment though, the car started to do a weird shuddering and clunking thing (which could be felt through the floor), but only at low speed and light or no acceleration, like when driving down a neighborhood street. Around town and on the highway it’s fine.

I finally got a service appointment last week and made the trek to my local dealer. I explained the issues and asked them to do a transmission diagnostic and a flush. A couple hours later they called and said they wouldn’t do a flush because it wouldn’t fix the problem, and the diagnostic showed that I needed a new transmission (“CVT assembly, exhaust gaskets, dipstick o-ring” and “module reprogramming”j at a cost of $4928. What???

I was informed that the warranty had expired (5 years or 60,000 miles)a that was that. After a small tirade, I was given the phone number for Nissan Consumer Affairs and I opened a case with them. 2 days later I was told all of the CVT warranty extensions didn’t apply to the Murano, and when I complained that surely the transmission should last more than 46,000 miles shouldn’t it (???) I was told that I was “fixated on the mileage” (uh … yes. Yes I am.) and ignoring the 6 and a half years part (sorry, I’ve been stuck working remote/from home for the last 2 years due to COVID). I asked if Nissan was really saying that their CVT transmissions really shouldn’t be expected to last more than 46,000 miles because if so, how could I ever be expected to purchase another Nissan, and the conversation shifted to there being the possibility of a “goodwill” credit (where Nissan would pay for half perhaps), but I didn’t qualify for that because Nissan had not seen my car for regular maintenance, and with no service history they didn’t know how well the car had been serviced/maintained and therefore they were unwilling to extend any sort of credit. I told them I could supply all of the maintenance receipts (my son did oil changes and cabin filter replacements and whatever else at the shop(s) he worked at, never DIY changes in the driveway or anything … though I would think I should have the right to do so if I wished) and I was told that wasn’t good enough and Nissan would have to have the service records themselves. That was that then, and she wished me a good day.

Soooo now what?? Blue book on the car is $20K. Do I trade it in, do some research, and get something else (not another Nissan!) or do I begrudging drop $5K on a new CVT? Will a new one better designed or will they have to replace the crappy one with another new but still crappy one (which I think will only have a 1 year warranty — unless someone thinks it should have a 5 year/60,000 mi again).
 

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If your financial situation allows you to buy the a new car you absolutely can although you may not get bluebook value with it needing a CVT. Any number of issues could be the cause of your failure but technically speaking…the original warranty on any vehicle is intentionally at a year/mileage that the car can be expected to perform well. Anything beyond that you‘re always at risk for a pricey failure unless you opt to purchase an extended warranty. Especially if you can’t provide service records to show the required maintenance has been performed at the intervals in the manual. If you haven’t had any other issues then it’s cheaper to get the new CVT but if you don’t mind the extra cost of buying a new car then that’s a personal call
 

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Oct 2010 Ti Australian Model (Manufactured Japan)
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Just a whole lotta wrong going around with these Transes!:sick::mad:
 

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The formula for selling your car to a dealer or car sales lot is very simple:

1) Dealer appraises the vehicle coming in and sets a wholesale (NOT retail value.) Keep in mind that when you trade or sell to a reseller, you ALWAYS get wholesale for the vehicle, not retail.

2) Purchase offer reflects wholesale value minus any needed repairs. (Trade-in is slightly different, explained below.)

If the Blue Book (retail) is $20,000 then the wholesale value is probably around $15,000. If a dealer bought the car from you the purchase value would be $15,000 minus any repairs, which would include the transmission replacement and any other needs such as shocks, tires and brakes. That means the ACV (Actual Cash Value at wholesale, a term we used all the time when I sold cars) would be under $10,000. BTW, if you did a Blue Book check on your car's value, it will show wholesale as well as retail values.

Now, what if you trade?

Let's say you trade your vehicle on a car that retails at $25,000. Given your car might have an ACV of $9,000, that leaves $16,000 difference. But let's say the dealer has $20,000 invested in the car. If so, there is $5,000 of profit (on paper) in the price at $25K.

Now let's say the dealer is willing to make a $3,000 profit on the car you buy instead of the $5,000 in its current price listing. He'd offer you a trade-in of $11,000 on your car, moving $2000 of "on paper" profit over to the trade-in to make the numbers more attractive.

My opinion, remembering it's worth what it cost you: on a Gen 3 Murano, if you really like the car and it's in great condition, I'd spend the money on the transmission. Buying a used car is always a crapshoot, and you already know the condition of this one and how it has been maintained. If you really like it, then IMO it's worth keeping.
 

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Agree with Pilgrim
brought with me my Murano 2015 with 90 000 kliks to Prague (Europe) my Murano only one here, too thirsty for Europe. now 30 000 more mostly in City traffic no problem with tranny, car still runs like new, (only Map switch sometimes seize)

Bouht here Toyota C-HR.. piece of s... dumped it after 3 months, stickin' to my Murano Platinum, hope that tranny will last heavy city traffic, but if it dies, will have shipped remade tranny from US. During my stay in Canada (47years) had many US/Can made cars, best pontiac GP 24V and later Honda Oddy, daugter killed Hondas tranny had her redone (4 C$ k) 10 years ago- still OK in Canada

I will have tranny replaced by somebody else, and only tranny by tranny fixer. remade tranny for Murano was last year about +-$4,000. and with my experience you are OK for anoher decade, but yearly Oil, and smell tranny fluid, put it good Nissan recomended stuff
 

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I had the exact same problem with my 2015 Murano. I caught it at 48000 miles but under 5 years. It was completely replaced free of charge and knock on wood it is running fine now that just short of 115000 miles. I learned never to buy a used car again. You are buying somebody else's headache.What you do is up to you but if you have kept up on all of your maintenance and the car is still running good a 4000 price tag for a new transmission isn't that bad but I would only have Nissan do it. Yes it is only a one year warranty but that is all you get anywhere else. I like my Murano and take very good care of it hopefully it will last as long as my Altuma did, just short of 250000 miles. Best of luck
 

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My 2015 Murrano is having an issue when I drive at a low speed, I do not hear anything, but can feel under the floor of vehicle a bump or jerk. Once car is up to speed, it drives smooth My car is serviced regularly and very well taken care of Upon recommendation from Nissan dealership, I had a transmission flush in June. Since then, I have been having this issue. I have an appointment Wednesday with the dealership to check it out, however I had another service shop owner tell me it is the CVT transmission. He has seen this issue lots of times. He seems to believe that the dealership ship should cover if is the CVT transmission since it is under the 100,000 miles .if not then they need a recall.
 

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My 2015 Murrano is having an issue when I drive at a low speed, I do not hear anything, but can feel under the floor of vehicle a bump or jerk. Once car is up to speed, it drives smooth My car is serviced regularly and very well taken care of Upon recommendation from Nissan dealership, I had a transmission flush in June. Since then, I have been having this issue. I have an appointment Wednesday with the dealership to check it out, however I had another service shop owner tell me it is the CVT transmission. He has seen this issue lots of times. He seems to believe that the dealership ship should cover if is the CVT transmission since it is under the 100,000 miles .if not then they need a recall.
The cvt flush, if they truly did the flush, would have not changed your issue with your CVT. You can check for CVT codes in your TCM with an app posted all over this forum. Just search for it. You will need a dongle for it I think. Cheapest way to check unless the dealer gave you any CVT codes in their report/diagnosis. And NO, the CVT extended warranty for 10 yrs/100K was for 1st gen only. Get the codes read and post here.
 

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Nissan and Jatco don't seem to care, if they did they would ask for suggestions on how to improve their CVT's, I know of a few folks that could set them straight, and help with great improvements to make them last.
You would think with all the cost for warranty replacements etc. that they would be begging for help.
 
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