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I have a Murano 2015. The ABS actuator was replaced May 2017 on the first recall. It was checked on the second recall November 2018. The ABS warning lights illuminated and would not get off in November 2019. After checking in Nissan service, it was diagnosed that the ABS actuator failed again and needs to be replaced.
 

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It really raises my concern that Nissan has a continuous existing issue with this ABS actuator and couldn't fix it from root cause.
 

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When the issue happened again, I paid $2735 to replace the actuator from my pocket. Called Nissan Canada and they said it is not covered by them. Really frustrated!!
 

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(my own speculation...) I saw a big red-flag seeing the 20Kmiles brake-fluid flush requirement. I've been worried looking at the quick fluid discoloration.
I've drained&refilled the fluid at every oil-changes.
Does this requirement have anything to do (directly or indirectly) with these 3 ABS recalls ?!!!!!!
Does your 2015 have the same (20K) requirement ? Nissan may have known about this issue for a loooong time ?!
What is the real purpose for the STRICT fluid-change requirement ? Delaying the failures ? A way for (lawyers) to put the blame on owners who don't have maintenance records ?
Again, it's my own speculation.
 

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My guess is the 20k/2 year brake fluid change interval has more to due with the 3rd gens emergency braking system. For safety, liability, and to avoid costly damage to the emergency braking system components.

The recall seems to be due to a design or manufacturing defect --- hopefully they have had enough time to get it right this time...
 

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I think it "emergency braking system" only came standard since 2018 model ?! They recall involves others without those features.
Also, what is so "advanced" about the Nissan system which mandates the 20K interval ???? My 2014 Avalon Touring doesn't mention fluid replacement anywhere in the
manual, just inspect level. I just take a look at the latest 2019 Avalon & it is the same, upto 120Kmiles which is the most they scheduled. On the 2019 Avalon, they now even suggest
to change (WS "lifetime") fluid at 60K for heavy usage now ... but still no brake fluid change.
 

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Good point regarding non-emergency braking trim levels also having the 20k change interval, I missed that... It could be Nissan just wanted a standard maintenance procedure for brake fluid change interval across all 3rd gen Muranos...

I don't recall seeing a brake fluid change interval for all the cars I've owned either... Even though you can often get away with not changing it regularly, the braking performance will deteriorate over time... The system is also more prone to corrosion and contaminate issues...

I just checked the maintenance schedule for my 2003, and it doesn't mention checking brake fluid or replacing it. It just mentions to check pads, rotors, lines, and cables every 30k miles. I've always wondered why...

I think it's a good practice to change it every couple of years to keep this critical safety system's performance and components in top condition.
 

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Good point regarding non-emergency braking trim levels also having the 20k change interval, I missed that... It could be Nissan just wanted a standard maintenance procedure for brake fluid change interval across all 3rd gen Muranos...

I don't recall seeing a brake fluid change interval for all the cars I've owned either... Even though you can often get away with not changing it regularly, the braking performance will deteriorate over time... The system is also more prone to corrosion and contaminate issues...

I just checked the maintenance schedule for my 2003, and it doesn't mention checking brake fluid or replacing it. It just mentions to check pads, rotors, lines, and cables every 30k miles. I've always wondered why...

I think it's a good practice to change it every couple of years to keep this critical safety system's performance and components in top condition.
Part of doing a brake job was bleeding the system when I worked on cars. Knowledgeable mechanics realize that the fluid in the brake cylinders/calibers is taking a beating, and as with any other fluid, will break down quicker due to the conditions the brake fluid is exposed to.

If the brake pads are extremely warn, when compressing the brake caliber pistons (times 4 wheels), deteriorated dirty brake fluid can be forced back all the way back to the master brake cylinder, eventually causing more brake issues.

I've always bleed the axel that was getting the brake job. If I saw that the brake fluid was really brown and deteriorated, I would just flush the entire system. I always got comments from the customers that their brakes felt firmer then after the job was completed. At our garage, the mechanic was always required to take a ride around the block with the customer whenever any mechanical work was done. Customer then had to sign off on the job. If there was any issue, the car didn't leave. We never had a problem with come-back complaints.

You might also consider changing to DOT4 brake fluid, which gives a firmer pedal, lasts longer and breaks down at a higher temp then DOT3. Some dealers are starting to use DOT4 as a standard, just for these reasons.

Have a good day.

PS. Sysadmins could you please fix this editing error. Highlighting a word to replace it and when you type, the whole paragraph disappears, very annoying! You should just be able to replace the word, not lose the entire paragraph.
 

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PS. Sysadmins could you please fix this editing error. Highlighting a word to replace it and when you type, the whole paragraph disappears, very annoying! You should just be able to replace the word, not lose the entire paragraph.

If you're typing in MS Windows, you can type Ctrl-z to get it back.

50923


 

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Part of doing a brake job was bleeding the system when I worked on cars. Knowledgeable mechanics realize that the fluid in the brake cylinders/calibers is taking a beating, and as with any other fluid, will break down quicker due to the conditions the brake fluid is exposed to.

If the brake pads are extremely warn, when compressing the brake caliber pistons (times 4 wheels), deteriorated dirty brake fluid can be forced back all the way back to the master brake cylinder, eventually causing more brake issues.

I've always bleed the axel that was getting the brake job. If I saw that the brake fluid was really brown and deteriorated, I would just flush the entire system. I always got comments from the customers that their brakes felt firmer then after the job was completed. At our garage, the mechanic was always required to take a ride around the block with the customer whenever any mechanical work was done. Customer then had to sign off on the job. If there was any issue, the car didn't leave. We never had a problem with come-back complaints.

You might also consider changing to DOT4 brake fluid, which gives a firmer pedal, lasts longer and breaks down at a higher temp then DOT3. Some dealers are starting to use DOT4 as a standard, just for these reasons.

Have a good day.

PS. Sysadmins could you please fix this editing error. Highlighting a word to replace it and when you type, the whole paragraph disappears, very annoying! You should just be able to replace the word, not lose the entire paragraph.

Great shop practice. The best dealership I worked at had a dedicated QC person for just that kind of customer attention/satisfaction. Most places don't do that. My current dealer does it without me, but I've established a level of trust with them so I'm ok with it.
 

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Great shop practice. The best dealership I worked at had a dedicated QC person for just that kind of customer attention/satisfaction. Most places don't do that. My current dealer does it without me, but I've established a level of trust with them so I'm ok with it.
We had so many regular customers, if you came in for a tune-up, and weren't recommended by a regular, most times we couldn't/didn't have the time to help you. This was back in the late 70's and early 80's when most cars on the road didn't have electronic ignition and fuel injection, needing both a spring and fall tune-up for best mileage in the NE, plus the 3,000 mile/6 month oil changes. We were a full service garage, engine rebuilds/swaps, trannys, clutches, rear ends and everything but body work. Easy back then, 90% US made, rear wheel drive. Once you knew a engine and tranny inside and out, everything else was pretty simple.

Having the mechanic go with the customer pretty much guarantees the job is going to be completed correctly, plus it weeded out the bad/lazy mechanics real quick.

Have a good day.

PS If and when I have to go to the dealer, I always insist on meeting the mechanic who will be working on my car face to face and let him know I will be talking to him when the job is finished for a review of the work he completed. When the mechanic is aware that you'll be "checking" on him, the job is more likely to be completed completely and thoroughly.
 

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Some bits of data ...
  • Nissan is till on DOT 3 fluid. Toyota/Honda is still on DOT 3 from factory. Toyota recommends & appears to have a DOT 4 OEM offering.
  • Toyota/Honda doesn't have any specific requirement to replace brake fluid (according to their service schedule, upto 120Kmiles).
They do offer advanced braking systems standard.
* Nissan appears to apply the 20K replacement interval on many models besides the Murano. Don't feel too bad, if you have the 2.0T Altima, the interval is ONLLLLY 15Kmiles ... and if driving conditions are severe, then it's 7500miles !!!
Nothing against fresh fluid is better than old fluid ... something is just fishy here. Throw in the 3 ABS recalls & it doesn't look good.
 

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Brake Fluid: Define OLD ?
Nissan: 15-20Kmiles are too old ! If you're a hothead, then it's 7.5-10Kmiles.
Toyota/Honda: Who are you calling old ?
Others: What game are they playing ?
Nissan: By the way, let me check the ABS system before the NHTSA kicks our butt...
 

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Brake Fluid: Define OLD ?
Nissan: 15-20Kmiles are too old ! If you're a hothead, then it's 7.5-10Kmiles.
Toyota/Honda: Who are you calling old ?
Others: What game are they playing ?
Nissan: By the way, let me check the ABS system before the NHTSA kicks our butt...
For ALL cars:

Old is when the pads are worn down or the brake system has not been touched in several years. At that time, the fluid in the brake caliber has potentially been subjected to temps of 400F +. Plus brake fluid absorbs moisture over time due to condensation, which ends up as water in the brake calibers, seeing that water is heavier then brake fluid. That water will start to rust the inside of the caliber piston bore, eventually causing a binding/leaking caliber.

One of our mechanic's insisted that you should bleed the axel before doing a pads replacement, so that there's never a chance for contaminated brake fluid to be pushed back up into the system when compressing the caliber pistons. To each his own, but is was sound advice.

Check the part number of your ABS unit, located on the passenger's side firewall down under the cowl. Square silver box with plenty of small silver pipes coming out of it.

Using flash light and a clean moist cloth, clean the top of the box. Right on the front edge is the part number etched into the metal. Write it down and compare it to the recall notice posted here. Maybe we should start a polling post where we can post our ABS part number for comparison.

Have a good day.
 

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You all are making me want to have my break fluid changed!!. Interesting tidbit, Service Manager at my dealer, who I am very friendly with, told me they check the condition of the fluid and recommend based on that more than the stated internal. The reason is that they understand customer's financial constraints/considerations. In other words, they will base recommendations on priority.
 
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