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Discussion Starter #1
Just went to get my 3 year oil change and they said the rear pads are at 3mm. Quoted 450 to do the rear pads and rotor replacement. I have a friend who has a jack and tools and I'm planning to do my first every self rear brake kit replacement once the weather warms up a bit. (I am generally handy so I think I can handle this job.)
(Note: I am a fairly aggressive driver that uses brakes often)

1 - ceramic brake pads or metallic? I hear ceramic is longer lasting and recommended for light vehicles but metal handles temperature better and is recommended for suvs. Which one is better on the rear wheels for a Murano?

2 - solid, cross drilled, Slotted, cross drilled & slotted - what rotor? I keep hearing that because brake pad compounds aren't a problem anymore, solid is the best performing rotor. Is that accurate? Should I just get a solid one and call it a day?

3 - do I need any kind of special torx head to open up the calipers?

Is this a good kit?
https://brakeperformance.com/brake-rotors/premium-replacement-brake-kit.php?d=51602
Or something else from that site?
 

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Why does a 2016 need new pads or rotors? Rotors are lifetime parts unless there’s a mechanical problem. Rear pads should last 100,000 miles easily unless there’s a problem.

@Robotazky
 

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Why does a 2016 need new pads or rotors? Rotors are lifetime parts unless there’s a mechanical problem. Rear pads should last 100,000 miles easily unless there’s a problem.

@Robotazky
Partially agree on the rotors--in the rust belt they won't last the life of a car, but even a 3 year-old car shouldn't need to have them replaced. The pads are another story, but the rear pads aren't very thick brand new. With 3mm left, the OP should have quite some time before needing to replace them. I would just keep an eye on them until they're below 2 mm.
 

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On my 4 previous Nissans, the brakes didn't last over 60K miles (the 2 Maximas even needed earlier services due to warped rotors).
I think the rear pads wore out faster (probably due to load-balancing feature ? or due to VDC dealing to hard cornering ?).
I replaced (2004 Maxima) with cross-drilled & slotted rotors + performance metallic pads. After about a year, I had to put back the original stuffs due to noise & dust. The braking performance wasn't that much different.

I think the Murano has very good brake setup. It's better than my 2 Maximas and current Avalon. I think Nissan did the right thing by specially giving the Murano large rotors (The rear rotor is even ventilated) + dual-piston upfront. Personally I'm happy with it.... On the other hand, what is up with the brake fluid ? At 15K miles, I drain/refill (looking brown) with fresh fluid. Two weeks later, it looks brown again. Got to flush them out at 20Kmiles.

I recently looked at the pad on my Avalon ~50K miles. Still had about 6mm left. It eats about 1mm a year, same drivers.
 

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Rotors are lifetime parts unless there’s a mechanical problem. Rear pads should last 100,000 miles easily unless there’s a problem.

@Robotazky
rotors are NOT lifetime parts; how long pads last is mostly dependent on braking/driving "style."


to op, the stock setup on the Murano is pretty decent so i'd stay with oe Nissan (or oem from rockauto) pads. as to the rotors, measure the rotor thickness/runout/etc and compare to fsm specs to determine if they need replacement also. if so, i'd go with oe Nissan (or oem from rockauto). unless you're not satisfied with how the braking is now, why deviate from what's working well for you. also, how many miles are on them?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
26k Miles.

Dunno what to say other than the pads are probably at 3mm since thats what they said. I brake pretty hard on the highway.

I have no complaints with the setup other than Nissan parts probably cost a lot more than non Nissan parts since they have the Nissan logo.
 

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26k Miles.

Dunno what to say other than the pads are probably at 3mm since thats what they said. I brake pretty hard on the highway.

I have no complaints with the setup other than Nissan parts probably cost a lot more than non Nissan parts since they have the Nissan logo.
You sound like a driver after my own heart. I'm a very hard driver and used to go thru brakes like water no matter what car I've owned.


Over the years, the best combo that I've come up with is buying H3000 slotted & drilled rotors and hybrid ceramic/metal pads. Cost is a little more, about 20% over stock, but I get over triple the life without any loss in braking performance.


Basically, you want to maintain the same OEM grip factor. Stock rotors are usually H2700 (Hardness factor, higher is harder.), with ceramic pads, good for normal braking. Push on them and they'll wear right out.


By using the harder rotors and more grippy pad, I've maintained the same OEM grip factor on the braking system. You can push on them and unless you ride the brake and over heat them, they will last you a lot longer then a stock setup.


Also, slotted and drilled rotors not only run cooler when braking, but the slots cleans brake dust off the rotors, amplifying the function of the slot in quality brake pads. That slot is used to remove the dust from the surface of a rotor. Brake dust is highly abrasive and the more removed, the longer the system will last.


To maintain that firm feeling of the pedal as the car ages, replace the rubber wheel hoses with SS braided hoses. As they age, the rubber hoses will expand when braking, loosing that firm feeling when braking hard.


Have a good day.
 

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26k Miles.

Dunno what to say other than the pads are probably at 3mm since thats what they said. I brake pretty hard on the highway.

I have no complaints with the setup other than Nissan parts probably cost a lot more than non Nissan parts since they have the Nissan logo.
Your car has low mileage. Unless you've got money to burn, no need to mess with the rotors if you have no complaints with how the car is driving. You're basically burning through 1mm of pad material every ~4,000 miles so you might be able to go another year on the current pads. Unless you're in a state where they have a minimum thickness to pass a safety inspection, just keep an eye on the pad thickness and change them before they wear down completely.
 

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Id consider a second opinion about the state of your rear brakes if a tech claims only 3mm after only 26000 miles. Driving with the emergency brake on may be the only way to cause that much wear in that little amount of driving (or perhaps living in the Swiss Alps)
 

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Id consider a second opinion about the state of your rear brakes if a tech claims only 3mm after only 26000 miles. Driving with the emergency brake on may be the only way to cause that much wear in that little amount of driving (or perhaps living in the Swiss Alps)
The parking/emergency brake is a set of shoes inside a drum on the rear rotors.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I live in New England and am definitely a maniac on the highway. Is there such a thing as an honest mechanic I can get a second opinion from?

Last 2 cars I had, I wore the pads down in about 3 years and this is a an early 2016 so it doesn't sound off.
 

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You only change rotors when they are warped and you are tired of having a pulsating brake sensation. That is mostly felt on the front brakes. I am sure you don't need them. Rear pads on the other hand wears out faster than the front at the ratio of 3:1. Around 30K is about right. I strongly suggest getting your ceramic pad replacement from autozone. Their lifetime warranty on those can't be beat. So long you own the car, all you need to do is return the old one in exchange for a new one for free. Just make sure the pad material does not reach the backing plate. They perform as good as oem. Have a friend or indy shop install it for you. Better yet, learn how to do it yourself. Its an easy job once you get the hang of it.
 

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You only change rotors when they are warped and you are tired of having a pulsating brake sensation. That is mostly felt on the front brakes. I am sure you don't need them. Rear pads on the other hand wears out faster than the front at the ratio of 3:1. Around 30K is about right. I strongly suggest getting your ceramic pad replacement from autozone. Their lifetime warranty on those can't be beat. So long you own the car, all you need to do is return the old one in exchange for a new one for free. Just make sure the pad material does not reach the backing plate. They perform as good as oem. Have a friend or indy shop install it for you. Better yet, learn how to do it yourself. Its an easy job once you get the hang of it.
An amendment to this....

You normally change rotors when they are worn below minimum thickness, not when they are warped. Of course, if you leave rotors on when they are below minimum thickness, they WILL warp before long, which is another warning that they are toast.

A vehicle may wear out the pads well before the rotors are worn out, but it pays to check them when replacing pads. The minimum thickness is normally cast into the outer lip of the rotor, but it is also available in service manuals.
 

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An amendment to this....

You normally change rotors when they are worn below minimum thickness, not when they are warped. Of course, if you leave rotors on when they are below minimum thickness, they WILL warp before long, which is another warning that they are toast.

A vehicle may wear out the pads well before the rotors are worn out, but it pays to check them when replacing pads. The minimum thickness is normally cast into the outer lip of the rotor, but it is also available in service manuals.
True. But I find real world scenario usually you get warped rotors way before the thickness limit is reached. Or thickness is mostly ignored unless its affecting the brake function which is usually warped rotors. And on the other side of the spectrum, you have folks changing them almost as often as they change the pads. Which I never understand.
 

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And on the other side of the spectrum, you have folks changing them almost as often as they change the pads. Which I never understand.
Probably because they don't understand cars and they're getting upsold by repair shops.

There are always marginal cases where the rotors are only slightly above minimum spec and it becomes a judgment call, and in that case if I were the shop, I'd recommend replacement too.
 
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