Nissan Murano Forum banner

161 - 180 of 197 Posts

·
Registered
Nissan Murano 2015
Joined
·
8 Posts
Fog DRL/Turn Signal Installation with pictures.

The following is a walkthrough of the installation of DRL/Turn signals to your fog lights. This should work on any 2015+ Murano. Your mileage may vary. Feel free to ask questions.


First I'll deal with issues that came up and then I'll do a walkthrough of the pictures with the install.


As soon as the box was opened, you could see that there was a issue. First, the assembly replaces the black trim around the fog lights. Both are made with the same soft type plastic. Trim is held on with just 4 tabs that press out against the inside edges of the bumper opening.


1. The bottom edge of both LED trims were bent in along with all the tabs, making it almost a 1/2 inch off. My wife and I were able use a hairdryer on high heat and using oven mitts were able to bend the bottom edge back into position and hold until it cooled into position. We also heated and bent the tabs into their correct positions, comparing it to the removed original trim.


2. The LED part is held to the trim with 2 screws, 1 each at the bottom of the U, and two small molded tabs at the top of the U. These tabs stick up thru small slots at the top of the LED and the tab left sticking out was hot iron sealed down. All four of the tab seals were broken off and the end of the LED U was just kind of hanging there on each trim. After heating and correcting the first problem we were able wiggle the tabs back into the slots so that the LED sat flush on the trim. Any movement caused it to pop apart. So we cleaned the entire area with Denatured Alcohol, wiggled the tabs back into the slots, and while holding the LED tight to the trim, used an industrial strength hot glue gun to lock the two pieces together. Came out solid as a rock and we made it a little more water tight.


Pig-Tails: You'll see me using that term a lot. I learned this technique back in the mid 70's when stereo swap outs were the rage and it was the way that a garage would wire in tow lights to your car. Didn't have kits or these quick electrical taps and such. If done right, it's perfectly safe for low wattage connections, less the 35 watts.


A pig-tail connection is as follows: The wire that you want to insert into the back side of a connector (The side where the wires come out.), strip off between 1/4 and 3/8 inch of the insulation and twist the bare wire to stiffen it. Using a soldering iron (gun) tin the exposed wire cleanly, no lumps or extra solder. Cover the exposed wire with DI-Electric grease to help the contact and prevent corrosion. Using a needle nose pliers grip the wire just above the tinned wire part. Slightly move the existing wire aside and push the tinned wire down into the opening until insulation is down into the connector opening so that no bare wire is exposed. If the wire is the right size, you can actually feel your wire scrapping the metal connector below and making contact. Give a slight tug to make sure it's seated tight. If not, remove it and using the needle nose pliers give the tinned end a small kink and re-insert. If still loose add a little more solder to make it thicker.


This technique can be used on any connector. Try to use the same gauge wire and always use a inline fuse just large enough so that you're not popping fuses on your add on device.

To physically install the LED's first turn the front of the wheel in. Remove the clip at the bottom of the fender. Pull back the plastic trim a little and lift the wheel well liner. The opening is large enough to stick you hand in and a clear view of the back side of the fog light.
Reach in and push the trim tabs out, the top ones push down and the bottom ones push up. The trim pulls out straight. It looks like it wants to come out crocked, but don't let it. It will just bind and you'll have to push in and start again.
Using a short Philips screwdriver remove only the outside screw on the fog light frame. Grab the fog light frame and pull out and down. It will be hard and will only move down a little after it pulls out.
Insert the wire loom dressed LED wire thru the small opening at 2 o'clock (drivers side) as mush as possible while aligning the new trim with the openings. Press in straight until you hear/feel all four of the tabs click into place.
In the fender well, pull on the LED wire gently to get it all in to the fender well. Grab the fog light frame, swing it up and press into position. Install the screw. Connect to ends and use the chassis ground bolt for your ground. Put the fender well liner back into position and clip the trim back into position. Install the clip. Repeat on the other side.


In the engine fuse box you need to remove the top factory wire bundle up out of the box to be able to connect into the harness and keep it looking factory. The bundle is held in with a plastic frame with metal clips below. The clips have to be bent with a small thin screwdriver. You'll bend them back into position once it's apart very easily. Once released, the plastic frame splits in half. Note position and orientation of this plastic frame!!!
Carefully remove the electrical tape back about 3 to 4 inches on the wire loom. DO NOT CUT THE LOOM when removing the tape. Patience is the key. Once you have the tape back locate the split in the wire loom (It's usually on the bottom) and insert the LED wiring up with the existing wiring until the wire looms touch.
Starting an inch back over where the tape was removed, first do several loops around the loom before starting to tape up the loom. When you reach the wire looms at the T, loop the tape down and around the LED loom, over the factory loom and back down around the LED loom again from the other direction before continuing up to where the tape was originally. Reinstall the plastic frame in the correct direction and orientation and press it into place until it clicks. Complete the pig-tail connections. Double check all wiring before starting the car and checking the functions. When finished, put the fuse box cover back on and you are done.

Pic 1 shows where I pig-tailed the LED/Turn signal wiring into the vehicle wiring. This is the engine bay fuse box and I'm using connector E209, pins 10, 11 & 15. Pin 15, the red wire, is power to the LEDs. The pin sends power to the turn signal array on the steering column and is protected by a 10 amp fuse. My red wire pig-tail is drawing 12 watts and is protected by a 1 amp inline fuse. Pins 10 & 11 are the L/R turn signal CAN signals. The yellow and orange wires from the LEDs are pig-tailed here. They don't draw any power, just sense when the circuits are active. They pull down (activate) an electronic relay in the little control box to turn off the LED and turn on the turn signal, drawing power from the 12V.


Pic 2 is a far view of the engine fuse box. Looking at the top by the yellow relays you'll see where I placed documentation of my wire add on. The part circled yellow shows where the wiring harness was pulled from the box, stripped to add the new LED wiring.


Pic 3 shows everything taped backup. #2 shows where the LED harness enter the factory harness. #1 is showing the inline 1 Amp fuse covered with a short piece of 3/4 inch wire loom to hide it.


Pic 4 is showing the driver's side fog light with the LED installed. #1 shows the screw that needs to be removed. #2 shows the wiring coming from the LED and the Ground coming down.


Pic 5 showing #1 the ground properly grounded to a body ground point and #2 just showing the ground wire coming over.


Pic 6 shows the loomed cover wire going over to the passengers side. The top plastic radiator cover has been removed for wire placement.




Pic 7 is the control box stuck on the side. Yellow wires go the LED lights and the red one goes to the factory harness. Once the plastic radiator cover is on you can't see anything.



Pic 8 is of the running LED on DRL mode.
Hello Paulday
U didn't used any relay, it doesn't blow bulb /fuse.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #162 ·
Hello Paulday
U didn't used any relay, it doesn't blow bulb /fuse.
I used the fuse holder that came with the DRL setup, but only have a 5 amp fuse in it.

I'm tapping into the power going into the turn signal array for the power and tapping L/R turn voltage for the turn signals. These are all located in the electrical fuse box under the hood on the driver's side.

The walk-thru points out the locations where you'll connect the DRL wires.

Mine are still going strong. I had to do a repair on the driver's side when one section failed due to poor workmanship after about a year.

Have a good day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Nanduchhetri

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
@PaulDay ,

Sorry for hijacking your thread again...lol

Did some mods this weekend

  • New LED logo on the back (Nismo)
  • New MURANO logo on the 3rd brake light

51660
51661
51662
51663
 
  • Like
Reactions: PaulDay

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #164 ·
I brought the same Nismo item, plus a few others that I haven't installed.

51667


In order to install, you have to drill a hole for the wire, which I refuse to do on the metal door. I was thinking of installing it on the plastic piece that holds the license plate lights and latch button. That way if I want to remove it, I'll just have to buy that one piece.

I see you've got it wired to the parking lights. Be nice if it was always on, but then you'd have to run a wire from the bumper area up thru to the tailgate wire loom into the tailgate to the light.

Have a good day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
I see you've got it wired to the parking lights. Be nice if it was always on, but then you'd have to run a wire from the bumper area up thru to the tailgate wire loom into the tailgate to the light.
No, I have it wired to the license plate light which is close by, so it is only on at night, and open/close door.

In order to install, you have to drill a hole for the wire, which I refuse to do on the metal door. I was thinking of installing it on the plastic piece that holds the license plate lights and latch button. That way if I want to remove it, I'll just have to buy that one piece.
True, I had to drill a small hole in order to fish the wire inside, but it was easy enough, it is really a pin size hole, and I use 3M double sided tape to secure the logo, so the hole is sealed.
The hole is small enough that I can patch it with bondo, and no one will ever notice. Also, I am pretty sure the next owner will appreciate it if I decide to sell it.

I though about placing it in the middle and avoid drilling a hole, but it would not look good there.

Where did you get that round nissan emblem? Is it for the front? That one looks good.

I am thinking of doing something similar for my front logo, but I would rather have the light come out through the letters instead of the surroundings.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #166 ·
I got all three of the emblems on AliExpress. The round one I got for use as a hitch light.

I brought the front logo to remove the paint and chrome where the letters are and put a small LED strip inside to light it from the back, but that's been on the back burner for a while now.

I got several projects going on at once here, one getting a starter into the Fiat so that I can make emissions testing that's due tomorrow. Otherwise I have to pay another $20.00.

Have a good day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Many upgrades are here on the page. I want to be just collect many information about the filterspoint . I don't know what you want but through here i know you can easily find filters from here.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #169 ·
Can you swap your taillights on the 2017 from normal to the led ones or would you need to modify em
The plugs for both the body and tailgate are different. The body taillights now have glow, '18 and under doesn't have that. The tailgate taillight now includes the second half of the stop light, to increase braking visibility, which has been consistently reported as too dim on the 3rd Gen in insurance reports.

In order to modify, you'd have to bring a wire for the glow on the body taillight. On the tailgate, you have to bring a brake wire from each body side up thru the tailgate wire loom and down to the tailgate light location. To retain the water seal, you'll also need to replace the wiring harness at each location where it goes thru the body work. There's one more wire needed at each location for the new lighting style in each wire boot seal.

I was going to go this route, but it's too much for little gain. You're better off spending money on the LED bumper lights that replace the reflectors. If you wire the bumper LED lights into your regular back lighting, you can change the turn signal bulbs to Red LEDs (Will match the bumper LEDs.) and not get the rapid flashing issue. Fortunately, Nissan conveniently has the wiring harness connectors for the brake/turn lights on each side making tapping into them very easy.

You can also add a combo brake & back-up light that replaces the center piece on the back bumper. I love the center backup light. Really does wonders over stock when backing into a dark area. It lights the ground directly behind the car, where it's really needed.

Have a good day.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #170 ·
While installing a air horn, I discovered that my ground LED lighting has taken quite a beating. This strip was over the front driver's wheel:

52704


As you can see, very little light was being projected and because of internal heat, some of the the LEDs were actually melted.

I found a flexible aluminum channel with a water tight cover that I'll be using to install new LED lights. Hopefully they will last longer and stay bright. Here's the first one installed.

52705


After mounting with double sided tape and using thin wire retainers thru the plastic fender liner, the ends were sealed with clear silicon after the lens cover was installed. After the silicon had dried, I applied clear Gorilla tape, sealing the cover to the channel and sealed the ends with tape also.

52706


The light seems more spread out now.

52707


And not hard on the eyes.

52708


The rear tires are another story. The liners are made out of formed pressed cloth. They hold dirt and moisture like crazy. Instead of trying to work with them I just went and brought new ones. To keep them clean and dry, I coated them with clear polyethene, two coats in the inside. This is the old one. The picture doesn't do justice how dirty it really is:

52709


Here's a new liner with the led strip installed on the channel and the channel installed using silicon and wired to the liner.

52710


Closeup showing the wire holding the channel along with the silicon.

52711


Back side showing the metal holders and sealed with silicon

52712


I still need to apply the lens cover and Gorilla tape to seal it after the silicon dries.

I'll post finished photos soon.

Have a good day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,101 Posts
Hello Paul

IMO, these LED strips are not meant for outdoor use, especially in the harsh environment you are exposing them, under the car where you have rocks flying and hitting them, also have to consider the weather element with rain. Also you should use wire loom on any wires outside the car, even if it is hidden by the liners. Double sided tape is useless, that will eventually fall off.
Have you looked at Rock LED, these are LED that are meant to go under the car, they are made of aluminium and strong glass and very bright. You use screws to secure them to any surface. That is what I used on my car, and never had an issue, it's been on now for more than 2 years now.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #172 ·
Considering that they lasted 3 years and the 3M double sided adhesive tape was still sticking strong, I got my money's worth out of them. Ultra cleaning, a primer and heat applied after the install, will pretty much guarantee the adhesive tape staying until you physically pull it off. LEDs and wiring for the entire car is less then $30, switch was $10. Adding the aluminum channel w/cover was $25 more.

Actually, the LED strips themselves are water proof, if after cutting and soldering the wire on, you either seal the strip itself with silicone or liquid rubber. A friend has RGB LED strips placed at the front inside top of his fish aquarium, fully exposed to water, looks very sharp.

I've looked at available ground lighting. Too expensive for what you get, and very limited designs. Plus I can customize where and how they look and shine.

I upgraded to the aluminum channel for heat absorption and the cover to help protect with flying debris and cleaning. Covered with the clear Gorilla tape, I'm expecting another 3 years, if not more. By then, I'll probably be looking for a different look.

You won't find a piece of wire exposed in or outside my car, hidden or not. Wire loom goes on after the liner is in place and new wire is joined to existing.

Have a good day.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #173 ·
I started the interior upgrade, covering the brushed aluminum trim with a wood Burl vinyl wrap. I figured I'd start with one of the harder small pieces with a lot of exposed curves from the back center console.

52801


Two pieces of vinyl and three hours later with very sore hands.

52802


The wife's hair dryer was instrumental in getting the vinyl to stick well to the inner curves, along with a very sharp plastic edging tool. I had to keep pressing the vinyl into position as it cooled and locked into place. There's a few very tiny air bubbles, but I'm hoping that they will shrink over time until unnoticeable. Hopefully practice will make better.

I've already disassembled the front center arm rest to cover the brushed aluminum center piece. I'll post a photo when the center console is finished and reassembled.

Have a good day.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #174 ·
A little easier doing the arm rest.

52803

52804


Back door panels are next. I'll post when one is completed.

Have a good day.
 
  • Like
Reactions: assad and SEHale

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Hey Assad,




I just want to put this out. I'm not a daily driver. I have to keep a solar charger hooked up. I only go out when I absolutely have to. Most of the time my wife drives, so my car sometimes sits for up to a month at a time.


That being said, the ASC ROOM_LAMP connection can drain you battery if a door is left ajar. Light on dash means that ROOM_LAMP is active. BAT_SAVER has the same function, but will timeout. Not sure if it's reading battery voltage or a timer, but I know it's already saved my butt when I left the doors open most of the day while we were working on it.
I would suggest that you look at a battery tender such as the Battery Tender Junior. Much safer than keeping a charger on. Can keep it on 24/7. Will not overcharge but will keep at 100%. Only about $50. I keep one one a sports car that sits all winter without being started.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #176 ·
I would suggest that you look at a battery tender such as the Battery Tender Junior. Much safer than keeping a charger on. Can keep it on 24/7. Will not overcharge but will keep at 100%. Only about $50. I keep one one a sports car that sits all winter without being started.
A good solar charger for an auto is really just a trickle charger. Most (mine) only charges when battery voltage drops below a set value, usually about 13.2V, and stops charging when voltage reaches 13.8V.

Have a good day.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,306 Posts
Discussion Starter · #177 ·
Passenger's back door is completed. Two hour job.

Before:

52805

After:
52806


To remove the piece from the door panel, you do have to break 5 plastic welds and remove several screws. Before reassembly, file down the plastic welds so that they are below the piece and use #8-1/2" Pan Head screws to reattach. The plastic welds already have a hole in the center that is the perfect size for the new screws.

Have a good day.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
A good solar charger for an auto is really just a trickle charger. Most (mine) only charges when battery voltage drops below a set value, usually about 13.2V, and stops charging when voltage reaches 13.8V.

Have a good day.
Yes. I hear what you're saying and I understand and am not trying to question. My suggestion for a battery maintainer is that they are somewhat safer than a trickle charger.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,665 Posts
And my understanding is that there's a third type, a float charger. It will turn on and off as needed to maintain a full charge. I have a HF float charger, but I still hesitate to keep it connected for more a day or two once it registers fully charged... Every time I check it when it's fully charged I see ~13.2 volts being applied, I never see it fully turn off...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
302 Posts
I started the interior upgrade, covering the brushed aluminum trim with a wood Burl vinyl wrap. I figured I'd start with one of the harder small pieces with a lot of exposed curves from the back center console.

View attachment 52801

Two pieces of vinyl and three hours later with very sore hands.

View attachment 52802

The wife's hair dryer was instrumental in getting the vinyl to stick well to the inner curves, along with a very sharp plastic edging tool. I had to keep pressing the vinyl into position as it cooled and locked into place. There's a few very tiny air bubbles, but I'm hoping that they will shrink over time until unnoticeable. Hopefully practice will make better.

I've already disassembled the front center arm rest to cover the brushed aluminum center piece. I'll post a photo when the center console is finished and reassembled.

Have a good day.
I am a Man of Steel. Naturally, the Brushed Aluminum is in my DNA.......😆
 
161 - 180 of 197 Posts
Top