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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I just acquired a 2010 Murano (with 39K miles). It came from Texas with Michelin Latitude 235/55R20's (2 newish and 2 wearing out). For AWD, I figured I should have tires with more similar tire wear on them. Also, the Latitudes are just so-so in the snow.

So today, I got four Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady 255/50R20 tires. A few pics:
51133


51134


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51136
 

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Discussion Starter #2 (Edited)
I was shooting for a decent tire in the snow, at a reasonable price. These Goodyears were discounted $80, plus the 255's were $100 less than stock size. I was hoping that the extra 3/4" wouldn't make them sleds in the snow.

My first impression was that they have a noticeable road hum. Not horrible, but still a little disappointing. Also, today we got our first real snow of the season. It was snowing hard on the ride home from Sam's; however, there was absolutely no slipping on the drive home.

After 5" of snow, one of our neighbors (in a rear wheel drive BMW) got stuck near our house. After about 15 minutes of pushing, me and a couple other neighbors got him into his garage (just a few houses away). So I took out the Murano to see how it would handle the snow.

There was some occasional slipping, but I was able to navigate the streets with no problems at all. I assume that 235's would be even better; but I have no complaints about snow traction (at least with 11/32" of tread on them).
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
For a spare, a 235/65R18 tire (which came stock on the 2010 Murano SL) essentially has the same diameter (typically 30") and rotations per mile as the new 255/50R20 tires.

Goodyear Assurance WeatherReady:
SIZE
UTQG
MAX.
LOAD
Max. Inflation Pressure
Tread Depth
Tire Weight
Rim Width Range
Meas. Rim Width
Sect. Width
Tread Width
Overall Diam.
Revs. Per Mile
Country of
Origin
235/65R18
106H SL​
700 A A​
2,094 lbs​
51 psi​
11/32"​
32 lbs​
6.5-8.5"​
7"​
9.5"​
7.3"​
30"​
695​
Chile​
255/50R20
109V XL​
700 A A​
2,271 lbs​
50 psi​
11/32"​
36 lbs​
7-9"​
8"​
10.4"​
8.8"​
30.1"​
695​
Chile​
Specs taken from Tire Rack (provided by the manufacturer).

Notice that the overall diameters appear different, while the revolutions per mile* are identical. Although not always stated, it's arguable that revolutions per mile may be the more important of the two measurements.

For the spare, I plan to purchase a RTX, steel wheel (18X7, 5X114.3, 40) from Amazon. Then I'll probably mount a cheaper 235/65R18 tire on it.


* Revolutions Per Mile (per Tire Rack)
Revolutions per mile indicates the number of times a tire revolves while it covers the distance of one mile. Depending on the tire manufacturer, revolutions per mile may be either measured in a laboratory or derived from calculations based on their previous test experience.

Tire revolutions per mile cannot be calculated by simple math because the tire tread and sidewall bend and stretch (deflect) when the load of the vehicle presses the tire against the road. Since the resulting loaded or rolling radius is less than half the tire's published overall diameter (which would only reflect the tire's unloaded radius), calculating the tire's absolute rolling circumference isn't possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
235/70R17's also share essentially the same overall diameter as 255/50R20's and 235/65R18's. While I've heard that some 17" alloy wheels may hit the brake calipers, this doesn't seem to be an issue with steelies (potentially offering more options for an emergency spare).
 
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