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Discussion Starter #1
If Any of you with failed Alts could answer this question I would be indebted.

As I HOPE everybody knows, the Battery on a Murano is the old fashioned ADD WATER type.

I am amazed (Perhaps I just don't remember from back in the day!) at how much water (and how often) this battery requires.
I'm now checking (and adding distelled water) once a month.

So, is there any chance that some have ran this battery dry (water needs to be above the plates in each cell) and the plates have shorted, knocking out the Alt!
I note that at least on some occasions. the battery has had to be replaced also.
If the Alt has just stopped charging, the battery will run down, but that is no reason it would have to be replaced.

Of course it is always possible that the Voltage Regulator (Usually internal to the Alternator these days) has gone bad and the Alternator is actually Overcharging and frying the battery........
If we had decent instrumentation on the Murano we could tell if this was happening........



Have you checked YOUR battery this month?

Homer
 

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Major Geek
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Homer, call me an idiot newbie but I had **no idea** that they even SELL CARS with this type of battery anymore! Doesn't that seem a little ridiculous? Like they tried to go cheap on some components hoping no one would notice? That really threw me for a loop. And you've been adding water each month?
 

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Just checked the water in my battery for the first time (after 14 months of ownership) and it is down about an inch. Is it supposed to be filled to the top?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yeah, incredible isn't it.
Nothing like new century technology.
OK so it's new 20th century not 21st century......

It's the first maintenance type battery I can remember since the 70s.

If you are only down a inch after 14 mos, it almost sound like you have the dealer change your oil and he tops it off Kat.

There is probably some markings on the inside of the cells that show where to keep the acid/water.
Typically it would be down maybe 3/4 inch from spillover.
I can't see well enough up close anymore to see if those marks are there.
The most important thing is that the plates need to always be kept covered.

Do I add water every month?
No. Not really.
I check the water every month.
When I checked it at the oil changes it always needed water.
So now I check it every month. I add water probably every two months. Different cells use water at different rates IMO.

Properly maintained this battery will have just as long a life, and maybe more, than the maintenance free batteries.


I was just wondering if this contributed to the Alternator problem.
Nissan would never admit it if it did, IMO, since they would then have to defend their use of this type of battery.
Since the defense is obvious, they saved 21 cents or somesuch, they don't want to go there.

Homer
 

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Homer,

you got me on this one........last time I checked the battery must have been 6 months ago.............was OK............I guess I need to do it during weekend...............or better get a new one, maintenence free;)
 

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I checked my battery every 2 weeks and kept the water level where it should have been, and still experienced alternator failure - I doubt its related to the cheap battery, which many Nissans are equipped with.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
OK Eric, that's what I wanted to know.
I had been checking my Battery when suddenly I thought....... Eureka!
Oh well, it was just a thought.


If this thread doesn't do any more than to get people to check the battery water level, it has been worth it.

Homer
 

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It is rather astounding that a vehicle as sophisticated in some areas eg variable intake / variable valve timing, can still come with a "please add water" battery....a battery that the fluid level has gone below the top of the plates will not provide the required "cranking power" or voltage required and should result in hard starting...it may cause strain on the alternator as it would signal an undercharged battery all the time..
 

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I think this makes a good candidate for a sticky or faq entry. Having your car die in the middle of the road due to a dry battery is serious stuff. I for one would like to know exactly how to care for the battery. This is a first for me! Do you just add water? what about the acid? What kind of water, how/when to safely do it (protective gear)...etc.

Thanks for the heads up homer.

A new, maint free battery just may be one of the first "mods" I do to this car....
 

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BigRedNJ said:
I think this makes a good candidate for a sticky or faq entry. Having your car die in the middle of the road due to a dry battery is serious stuff. I for one would like to know exactly how to care for the battery. This is a first for me! Do you just add water? what about the acid? What kind of water, how/when to safely do it (protective gear)...etc.

Thanks for the heads up homer.

A new, maint free battery just may be one of the first "mods" I do to this car....

The procedure to top off the battery with water is in your owners manual.
 

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Matthew Lesko
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Could you replace the stock battery with a maintenence free one?

I don't see why it would require that battery.
 

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Yes you could put a new battery in there, but why would you need to? The stock battery, if check every so often, should last 3 years at least. In the year I've owned my Murano, I've checked the battery once, and only had to add a little bit of water. This is living in a hot humid climate too.

The battery will eventually fail but not immediately. You may notice slower cranking or longer starts, and you can test the battery by giving it a good charge with a trickle charger and if it still starts weak, time to get a new battery. These things don't die overnight if you check the water level as often as you change your oil. Personally I'd rather spend the money that could be used unnecessarily on a new battery right now, on a good multimeter (if you do not have one already) which can be used to diagnose everything electrical on the vehicle.
 
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