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The snow and ice are getting deep! Is there any reason that I can't just leave the AWD locked up until spring? Will this cause any damage? I know it cuts out at 19mph, but every intersection is slick, and the snow is an issue on lesser travelled roads. Any harm possible to the equipment? I like having the traction at every slippery start.
 

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Mr. 3 K, 3/3/5. 5K,10/5/7
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Bruno Where do you live? GRIP :D
 

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Snow tires for sure.

Ever since my first winter at Cornell, I've learned that snow tires are a must even if you are in a 4x4 vehicle. Your tires provide traction, the AWD merely equalizes the power over the 4 wheels. Your stock touring tires won't help you slow down either. When I get my murano, even though I live in CA, I plan on getting some Dunlop Grandtrek M3s and mounting them on the stock wheels for winters.

Dave
 

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bruno said:
The snow and ice are getting deep! Is there any reason that I can't just leave the AWD locked up until spring? Will this cause any damage? I know it cuts out at 19mph, but every intersection is slick, and the snow is an issue on lesser travelled roads. Any harm possible to the equipment? I like having the traction at every slippery start.
The owner's manual is very specific about NOT leaving it locked up on dry pavement as this can cause damage.
 

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I watched a show on TV where they had 2 identical Toyotas on a hockey rink. One Toyota had all seasons and the other had winter tires. The winter tire equipped vehicle accelerated faster, stopped in a shorter distance and was able to handle the slalom course while the all season vehicle did not.

Winter tires on ice is the superior answer.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks guys for your opinions on tires. I've driven for 35 years though in real winter conditions, including many years in the Arctic and Yukon and am fully aware of what is necessary to get around safely here. I paid a $2000 premium for AWD, and would like to get optimum use from the system.

I'm not really driving on dry pavement, I'm driving on slippery, icy, snow covered streets. What would cause damage to the AWD system by keeping it locked up at low speed? Anybody out there with a technical take on what would happen?

Gripper, I live in north-central Alberta, Canada. Winter has arrived suddenly and harshly, a bit late this year.
 

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When a 4WD vehicle is left in locked position, both the wheels for a given axle supposedly turn the same amont. Therefore, if you turn, the wheel to the outside of the turn travels a farther distance than the inside wheel. If you're on slippery or loose surfaces .... no problem. If you're on solid non-slippery surfaces, the drive train can 'bind' putting all the stress on u-joints, and diffs, and transmissions. Unless you're familiar with 4WD, you've probably never experienced this.


The point is DON'T DO IT. The lock feature is meant for slow speed maneuvering, like if you're stuck, and rocking the vehicle. Unless you need to start like a jackrabbit every time whether there's snow and ice on the road or not, don't lock the diffs. Drive a little more carefully and slowly with ice covered roads, and use the lock only when you need it. Ice is still ice and is damn slippery even with AWD. I can't tell you how many people get AWD or 4WD and wreck the car the 1st snow season.

REVHIGH !!!!!!!!
 

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SHIFT_FASTER
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I just read a TSB about what happens if you use AWD lock on dry pavement... it cracks the casing of something or other. The fix is to replace it and change the AWD lock system to the new '05 version. Which is a push button, not a switch, and every time you shut off the car, the AWD lock is turned off.

And you can bet none of that is covered by warranty.

I treat the AWD lock just like I used the 4WD in my old Jeep. I always pay attention to the roads, driveways, whatever, and I only leave it on if I'm not encountering dry pavement at all. At the first sign of dry, I turn it off. And if your roads really are bad, especially at intersections, it's only about a second before the AWD engages automatically anyway.
 
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