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Windy City MO :)
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Discussion Starter #1
I posted this at F.A. as well so I'm just copying it over here. :D


I found this at COSTCO over the weekend.


I've been detailing cars, as a hobby, since I was 14 yrs. old and have tried almost everything that has hit the market. This, IMO, is one of the best ones I've tried.

I took the day off to run some errands and decided to wash the Mo. I sprayed the "Wet'N'Protect" on the tires and was surprised that it didn't foam up. Most of the "no-touch" products that I have tried usually do this. This one didn't. It sprayed on evenly with minimal overspray. Now what I usually do is spray the tires first then I wipe the vehicle down. When I'm done drying then I hit the tires and rims.

What surpirsed me this time was, I didn't have to touch the tires at all. You know how you usually have to get some areas where the dressing didn't take or wipe off the excess, well, not this time. :)

Look at these pics. I did ABSOLUTELY nothing extra to these tires. Just sprayed and wiped up any overspray that might have been on the rims. Watcha' think?

Oh, one more thing. It works great on the trimming as well. I applied some to a cloth towel and wiped down the trimming. To me, it almost looks new.

BTW, there is NO OILY feel to this product although it looks very shiny.




 

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OGz - lookin real good:cool:

I'm going to have to give that one a try.

In your first pic you MO almost looks gold, I guess that mirror glaze from your wax was reflecting your grass!;)
 

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OGz, do you know if the product contains any silicone? I ask because I stopped using tire treatments like this due all of them having silicone which will eat the tires away.
 

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http://www.notouch.com/index.htm

this site has some info on this:

"No Touch Wet 'N' Protect Trigger Spray (WPTS22-6)

No Touch enters the tire care market with a companion product to the original Wet 'N' Protect aerosol. This new Wet 'N' Protect Trigger Spray offers the ease of use, ultra high-gloss and streak free finish, that made the Wet 'N' Protect name famous, in a new convenient adjustable trigger spray bottle. No Touch is the leader in providing environmental friendly appearance products, and No Touch Wet 'N' Protect Trigger Spray is the first petroleum-based tire dressing on the market that meets California's 2003 VOC [volatile organic compounds] requirements. A pleasant cherry scent tops off the list of reasons to try this new Wet 'N' Protect Trigger Spray."


-Nerf
 

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oops that was for the wrong product, this is the one he was using.

WET 'N' PROTECT Wet Tire Finish

Clear liquid "Wet" tire finish easily sprays on clean tires for an ultra high-gloss finish.
Protects against ozone damage, dirt and dust.
Streak free -- Guaranteed!
Contains NO petroleum distillates.
 

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Windy City MO :)
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Discussion Starter #6
lnichols said:
OGz, do you know if the product contains any silicone? I ask because I stopped using tire treatments like this due all of them having silicone which will eat the tires away.
Silicon is bad for tires? This is a quote from their website. I'll have to do some more research on this. Do you have any links to articles?

3. Is Wet 'N' Protect® in the aerosol can formula the same as the other "wet products"?

Answer: No, No Touch® Wet 'N' Protect® aersol is formulated with no petroleum distillates that are proven to damage tires. Aside from the propellant, this product is 100% silicone and polymer ingredients that apply with no running and no mess. Wet 'N' Protect® is also water repellent so it lasts longer.
 

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Windy City MO :)
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Discussion Starter #7
KSmurano said:
OGz - lookin real good:cool:

I'm going to have to give that one a try.

In your first pic you MO almost looks gold, I guess that mirror glaze from your wax was reflecting your grass!;)
I noticed that too. :8:

My battery was about to die so I had to change some of the settings on my digital camera so that I could take a few more pics. These pics were taken with low resolution.
 

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and here is some more info, check what type of silicon is in the product.


http://forums.audiworld.com/s4/msgs/660231.phtml

"Oil based silicon (dimethal silicon) is bad for your car. It embeds itself into the tire's rubber, prevents blooming, and can get on to your paint, wreaking havoc. Even worse, it is hard to get off your tire once its on. Most retail stores sell this type (ARmor all, Meguiar's, etc)

There are only a handful that use the one that is water based (polydimethal silaxone). This one does not embed, does not harm paint, does not preven blooming and comes off easily.

I use Zaino's tire dressing which uses this compound. 303 protectant also uses this.

The shine is nice and satin and not too reflective."

-Nerf
 

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Windy City MO :)
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Discussion Starter #10
Okay....I'm a little confused now. This is a quote from the link above.

This is for silicone.
Siloxanes are straight chain compounds of Si single bonded to O
> atoms. This is what keeps the water bonded. Although it might
> be possible for these compounds to bond to plasticizers, one
> must weigh the relative good vs evil. Not treating a dash with
> anything is likely much worse than the moderate use of such
> products. The UV inhibitor for example is critical in the
> preservation of vinyl and rubber products. Also silicones are
> advantagous to protect from weathering and attack from Ozone.
> The use of silicone on rubber gaskets and seals is a widely
> accepted practice and I'm convinced it works. I tend to keep
> cars a long time and have long term experience with a car not
> treated and one that was. It was our conclusion that
> a "protective" layer of silicone is more beneficial than no
> protection at all and out weighs any possible detrimental
> effects of the use of such products.
>
And another one for silicone.
Liquid Silicone Dressings – These penetrating-type silicones form a flexible protective shield on rubber. Liquid silicone seals small openings with a film to prevent penetration of moisture and dirt. Most silicone dressings leave a never-dry gloss film. There are many myths regarding silicone, specifically the negative long-term effects of silicone on rubber and vinyl. The fact is, silicone is an inert material. The benefit of silicone is its ability to easily penetrate the tire’s surface and not evaporate. Some silicone-based dressings contain petroleum distillates as a cleaning agent. Petroleum distillates are harmful to rubber and vinyl, and will cause rubber and vinyl to crack. If you decide to use a silicone tire dressing, make sure it does not contain a petroleum distillate cleaner.
Against silicone.
Protection: There are two main degrading agents that attack tires and rubber trim. They are UV light waves and ozone. Both of these attack the long hydrocarbon chains of the rubber and, by breaking these bonds, shorten the molecules with resulting loss of elasticity and other problems. Tire manufacturers add two primary sacrificial protectants to the rubber. To protect against UV, they add carbon black. This is why tires dont come in designer colors to match your paint. The carbon black will turn white/gray as it absorbs the UV and dissipates the energy as heat. This is the basis of rubber parts turning gray as they age. To protect against ozone, tire manufacturers add a wax based, sacrificial protectant. The ozone attacks the wax and depletes it. As the tire rolls, additional wax is forced to the surface of the tire. This is referred to as blooming. This blooming refreshes the surface wax protectant. A tire that has not been flexed will have the wax depleted by the ozone and thus begin to degrade and suffer dry rot. The raw silicone oil that is the main ingredient in most of the nationally advertised, auto parts store, high gloss products may actually dissolve the wax and be the cause of premature tire sidewall cracking/failure. The quality tire/rubber dressings should contain a strong UV protectant to bolster the efforts of the carbon black and not contain any raw silicone oil. Many of the nationally advertised rubber and vinyl products also contain formaldehyde. If you plan on having a funeral for your vinyl/rubber, then you may wish to use one of these products.
 

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Your really confusing me now :confused:

I am a HABITUAL Tire Shine Nut & have never had any tire or paint problems?

I go through tire shine, only second to my Eagle spray & wipe. :cool:

I am always looking for long lasting & wetter looking brands.
 

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You got me totally confused now!

How much the useful life of the tires would be affected? How does it compare to the tread life? Is safety compromised? So many questions and no answer.:8:
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Sorry about all the confusion guys. :(

So far the research I've done, over the course of the day, is a 50/50 mix on silicon use. What's more important is the type of silicon this product has. I just sent the company an e-mail requesting the type of silicon they are using. I will post that information when I receive it.

Now, this is my observation from detailing my cars for the last 17 years. I've NEVER seen any tire dressing product do harm to any of the cars I've ever owned. The Murano is my 14th vehicle and I would belive that most of us would go through tires faster than this product could do damage- if any at all. :)
 

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My findings have been the same as far as different products causing damage to a tire. I have never seen it. I've used everything. I've use Armor All on OLD tires - the tread wore out first. I've used Black Magic - Meguire's - Turtle Wax - there isn't much I haven't tried. For some reason - the sidewalls always stay intact much longer then the tread does :)

Almost everytime I was the Typhoon I use something on the tires - still look great.

I've never been a big fan of the aerosol products - this might be one I have to try.
 

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I've used tire dressing before. I agree makes the tires look great. But I don't use them anymore because of one reason - they dust up and make the wheels so dark and ugly. I used to think no its just brake dust, but after a while I realized that if I did not use the tire dressing, my wheels would stay clean a lot longer.

Modern tires do not need dressing to stay pliable. I guess if you are willing to trade a few days of shine for dirty wheels, then its your choice.
 

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Windy City MO :)
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Discussion Starter #19
Eric L. said:
I've used tire dressing before. I agree makes the tires look great. But I don't use them anymore because of one reason - they dust up and make the wheels so dark and ugly. I used to think no its just brake dust, but after a while I realized that if I did not use the tire dressing, my wheels would stay clean a lot longer.

Modern tires do not need dressing to stay pliable. I guess if you are willing to trade a few days of shine for dirty wheels, then its your choice.
I think 99% of tire dressing users are not concerned about keeping the tires pliable. We just like the SHINY look. :D I don't think any of my cars have ever gone more than a few weeks without dressing.

Now you said the dressing makes the "wheels" look dark and ugly? This is a little trick that I came up with a few years ago.

When I upgraded my wheels/tires on my Supra, I went from stock silver to chrome. The one thing I hated the most was trying to get all the overspary off of the chrome. Half of my time cleaning and detailing my car was in the wheels. So, I took a big cardboard box and cut a circle that matched my rim diameter. Then I took a couple of zip ties and made a handle in the center. When I applied the tire dressing, I put my man-made rim cover over the rim and sprayed away. It was awesome, I had no more overspray. You should have seen the looks I got when I was at the car wash. :p
 

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I used to do the cardboard trick too, but I found as I drove, the tire dressing wore off and somehow got onto the rims. I had Borbet Type M 17" rims on my Maxima and it was a real hassle to clean between those narrow spokes. I do agree that maybe for show, shiny tires are nice. But for the everyday look, i don't like cleaning my rims every week (esp since those SE rims have narrow spokes).
 
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