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I've got a 2015 Murano and am the original owner, and going to get new front brakes and rotors this week. This SUV will finally have 45,000 miles on it. Most of my driving is highway (66%) and the rest is local. I'm a fan of coasting up to the red light, removing my foot from the gas before I have to stop for anything - and on the highway, when driving anywhere between 60 and 80 MPH, I don't like to apply brakes unless I have to.

Last week while coming back from a 650 mile round trip, I could hear a little bit of grinding noise come from front end, and assumed correctly that somethings up with the front brakes. This was confirmed during a brake inspection at local Firestone Dealer. The rear pads are still good with about 5 mm on them, which is about 1/3 of new pads, when new.

My question is, do Nissans and the Murano in particular seem to go thru' Brakes faster than most???

This is the first car I've ever needed to replace Brakes & Rotors on, having less than 50,000 miles. In fact, my last FORD didn't need a brake job until 90,000 miles, which I thought at the time was a fluke, but my daughter just got a front brake job recently, on her Fusion at 95,000 miles, and her rear were still pretty good. They said they'd look at them again next oil-change and/or tire rotation. I'm not here praising the Fords; but just giving some background as to my driving habits, and showing my reasons for concern. Any thoughts and/or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!!!
 

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I wouldn't be concerned... I drive much like you do, and I generally find I need new front brake pads around 40-50k miles for every car I have owned.

The grinding you're hearing is just the wear tabs telling you it's time for new pads. If it just started, your rotors should be fine.

Did they measure the rotor thickness and run-out to see if they need replacing? If they're within spec, which is likely, I'd just replace the pads with quality pads like Akebono. The new pads should seat-in just fine so long as your rotors are not scored...

You didn't mention what your other Ford was, but a Fusion is significantly lighter than a Murano, so I'm not surprised the brake pads lasted longer on it...
 

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You must have an issue that is causing abnormal wear. I changed the brake pads on first Murano, a 2004, at right at 100,000 miles. When I traded in my 2011 Murano it had the original pads on it at 120,000 miles although they were getting thin but still above minimum thickness. The same brake longevity on my last two Maximas. Absolutely no problems with the brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I wouldn't be concerned... I drive much like you do, and I generally find I need new front brake pads around 40-50k miles for every car I have owned.

The grinding you're hearing is just the wear tabs telling you it's time for new pads. If it just started, your rotors should be fine.

Did they measure the rotor thickness and run-out to see if they need replacing? If they're within spec, which is likely, I'd just replace the pads with quality pads like Akebono. The new pads should seat-in just fine so long as your rotors are not scored...

You didn't mention what your other Ford was, but a Fusion is significantly lighter than a Murano, so I'm not surprised the brake pads lasted longer on it...
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Thanks for the reply. You may have a point there about weight making the difference. The Murano is a solid vehicle and much heavier than a car. Firestone Dealer wants to replace rotors as well as pads. Same thing the Nissan dealer suggested. * Firestone quoted about $80 bucks less for same service so we'll see.

I think I will just throw on new pads for the rear when those get a little thinner. As far as all the "brake specials" everyone advertises; well that's just a joke. They all list "turning" of Drums/Rotors and really, no one does that anymore. Many shops don't even have the machine to do it if they wanted to. Similar to the good/better/best Oil-Change con.

Someone else mentioned that the scrapping I'm hearing is from the "squealers" they put on pads, but I don't think these OEM pads have those. If they did, I would have heard that high pitched squealing before this point.

Thanks Again.
 

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The unusual note in your original post is that the fronts wore out first. That's typical in most cars, but at least in the first generation Muranos, the rears typically wore out first. This seemed completely wrong to me when I first observed it, but it has been the subject of commentary here a number of times. Must be something about the way the brakes are biased.

Perhaps they changed the brake biasing on the 3rd gen and set it up differently so that fronts wear faster, which is the normal expectation in any case.

The factory pads are a ceramic blend, which is actually a good choice for replacement as well. I don't find the need for brakes at 45K to be unusual.

BTW - most new pads are about 10MM thick from the factory, not 15MM. Replacement is usually recommended when they hit about 2MM thickness.
 
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I think the 3rd gen is set up the same way as previous gens. I just had a 48,000km (30,000Miles) service. Front brakes measured at 8mm, while the backs are at 6mm.
 

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I've got a 2015 Murano and am the original owner, and going to get new front brakes and rotors this week. This SUV will finally have 45,000 miles on it. Most of my driving is highway (66%) and the rest is local. I'm a fan of coasting up to the red light, removing my foot from the gas before I have to stop for anything - and on the highway, when driving anywhere between 60 and 80 MPH, I don't like to apply brakes unless I have to.

Last week while coming back from a 650 mile round trip, I could hear a little bit of grinding noise come from front end, and assumed correctly that somethings up with the front brakes. This was confirmed during a brake inspection at local Firestone Dealer. The rear pads are still good with about 5 mm on them, which is about 1/3 of new pads, when new.

My question is, do Nissans and the Murano in particular seem to go thru' Brakes faster than most???

This is the first car I've ever needed to replace Brakes & Rotors on, having less than 50,000 miles. In fact, my last FORD didn't need a brake job until 90,000 miles, which I thought at the time was a fluke, but my daughter just got a front brake job recently, on her Fusion at 95,000 miles, and her rear were still pretty good. They said they'd look at them again next oil-change and/or tire rotation. I'm not here praising the Fords; but just giving some background as to my driving habits, and showing my reasons for concern. Any thoughts and/or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!!!

I had a 2004 Murano and I changed the pads (can't remember if front or rear) @ 80k and then the other ones @100k. I am not an aggressive driver so it last long... The dealer and shops always telling you to change even if you have life left in it. They want your money. If you go by the book and measure the pads yourself you'll be surprised to see that you can drive the car for another 2 years without problems.
 

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My rears lasted me about 60,000km and the fronts still had a bit left (maybe another 10,000km) but I just changed them both at once just to get it over with.

It's the first car I've had where the rears went first. Dealer told me the Murano uses the rears more when slowing down normally and uses the fronts more under heavier braking.

Tech said by using the rears more under normal braking makes it's a more "comfortable " driving experience by not getting the front dip down when slowing down.
 

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I've gone through 2 sets of rear pads by 80,000. Just replace the fronts. I put Power Stop truck rotors and pads all around because I have a lot of down hill stopping during my daily commute and my rotors were all warped. I'm at 98,000 miles now and they've been great.
 

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I dont think it is unusual to have brakes worn down that much that soon however whenever I have a question on why the breaks might be wearing sooner than I thought they would, I always try to confirm calipers condition and bracket spring nuts(not sure of correct terminology. Sometimes the caliper can go bad and get stuck with the inside pads wearing more or abnormally more than the outer pad. The nuts that mount the calipers have springs in them to help push the pads away from rotor when not applying brake. These do wear out. As long as your not experiencing uneven wear between inside and outside pads, there is most likely no issue
 

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I've got a 2015 Murano and am the original owner, and going to get new front brakes and rotors this week. This SUV will finally have 45,000 miles on it. Most of my driving is highway (66%) and the rest is local. I'm a fan of coasting up to the red light, removing my foot from the gas before I have to stop for anything - and on the highway, when driving anywhere between 60 and 80 MPH, I don't like to apply brakes unless I have to.

Last week while coming back from a 650 mile round trip, I could hear a little bit of grinding noise come from front end, and assumed correctly that somethings up with the front brakes. This was confirmed during a brake inspection at local Firestone Dealer. The rear pads are still good with about 5 mm on them, which is about 1/3 of new pads, when new.

My question is, do Nissans and the Murano in particular seem to go thru' Brakes faster than most???

This is the first car I've ever needed to replace Brakes & Rotors on, having less than 50,000 miles. In fact, my last FORD didn't need a brake job until 90,000 miles, which I thought at the time was a fluke, but my daughter just got a front brake job recently, on her Fusion at 95,000 miles, and her rear were still pretty good. They said they'd look at them again next oil-change and/or tire rotation. I'm not here praising the Fords; but just giving some background as to my driving habits, and showing my reasons for concern. Any thoughts and/or suggestions would be appreciated. Thanks!!!
Yes they are harder on the front brakes due to the weight of the engine on the front subframe which is right above the front suspension
 

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I had just the opposite problem. New rear brakes at 45,000 and I wonder if I really needed them because the dealership changed ownership a few weeks after that. New front brakes at 70,000. I have also only had cars that were out the front brakes much faster than the rear. Also it makes sense that Nissan would have made the rear brakes take on most of the highway load for smoother breaking and only the front brakes for emergency or downhill breaking. Best of luck going forward.
 

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You must have an issue that is causing abnormal wear. I changed the brake pads on first Murano, a 2004, at right at 100,000 miles. When I traded in my 2011 Murano it had the original pads on it at 120,000 miles although they were getting thin but still above minimum thickness. The same brake longevity on my last two Maximas. Absolutely no problems with the brakes.
We’re they AWD
 

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I agree with other posters that this is not unusual. My '03 AWD and '09 AWD Mo's needed brake work between 45K and 50K. And it was the back brakes that led the way. My '15 has 42K and so far brakes are good.
 

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My rears lasted me about 60,000km and the fronts still had a bit left (maybe another 10,000km) but I just changed them both at once just to get it over with.

It's the first car I've had where the rears went first. Dealer told me the Murano uses the rears more when slowing down normally and uses the fronts more under heavier braking.

Tech said by using the rears more under normal braking makes it's a more "comfortable " driving experience by not getting the front dip down when slowing down.
If you use CC more then 50% of your driving, you will see the rear pads wearing out sooner then the front.

It seems that the Murano uses the rear brakes almost exclusively when adjusting speed downward while in CC mode, except in panic mode. The Murano's ABS unit can control the braking force to each wheel individually, used for traction control, so there's no 50 - 50 or 60 - 40 split front-back braking force ratio like old school, under normal operating conditions. The system is also designed to prevent any "nose dip" during normal stopping, so the front-rear braking ratio is adjusted on the fly, so to speak, by the ABS unit, with feedback from the main CPU which monitors the car's G forces.

Master cylinder is a dual chamber with the ABS default lockout being set to 50 - 50 split diagonally, one chamber stopping the LF and RR tires, while the other chamber affects the RF and LR tires. This setup allows the car to still stop straight in the event of the failure of the ABS, broken brake line, or other brake system failures, like having a tire torn off in a collision.

Have a good day.
 
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I have always been hard on brakes (just the way I drive) and no matter what vehicle I've driven, it seems I always ended up changing the rear for every 2nd time I've changed the front brakes.
Needless to say, I've only owned my Murano for a couple of months. Bought with 18,000 miles on it and noticed a light squeal when first driving vehicle after sitting for awhile while in reverse, that seems to go away.
Know this could be light surface rust but will eventually do new pads all the way around before too long.

So far, loving this vehicle!
 

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I have had the same exact symptom of light sqeeling first thing in the am or after letting the car sit and after rain too. I believe it was light rust on the rotor as well, goes away after a really short bit. Heard most when in reverse. I did just change the rear pads today, so we will see if they had anything to do with it as they were worn right down to the wear bar. 2010 LE AWD.
 
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