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Discussion Starter #1
My 2005 has a humming noise from the passenger side whenever I make a slight left turn at speeds above about 40 MPH. The sound level does not change whether I press accelerator or coasting. This existed for almost a year and it gets a little louder over the time. I always suspect the passenger side bearing but there is no detectable looseness or any play when I manually shake the wheel (car on jack stands), nor any roughness when manually spin the wheels. What else can this possibly be? I don't want to just replace the bearing if I am not sure of it. The tires have about 50K miles but look fairly even with enough tread left.
 

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My 2005 has a humming noise from the passenger side whenever I make a slight left turn at speeds above about 40 MPH. The sound level does not change whether I press accelerator or coasting. This existed for almost a year and it gets a little louder over the time. I always suspect the passenger side bearing but there is no detectable looseness or any play when I manually shake the wheel (car on jack stands), nor any roughness when manually spin the wheels. What else can this possibly be? I don't want to just replace the bearing if I am not sure of it. The tires have about 50K miles but look fairly even with enough tread left.
I had a wheel bearing hub making humming noise on my 2003. My wheel too had absolutely no play, and no roughness when turned manually. However, after I removed the wheel bearing hub and turned it by hand it wasn't smooth like a new one is. I replaced it and the noise was gone.
 

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BTW, if you live in an area that cars rust, be prepared to have a struggle prying the hub loose from the steering knuckle... I resorted to using a high-grade steel bolt and nuts though the brake caliper mounting bracket that pressed against the rotor. It made a heck of a noise when it finally broke the bond... I used an old used brake pad between the bolt and rotor to protect it.
 

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Another problem you can run into is the ABS wheel speed sensor. The end of the sensor sits inside the wheel bearing hub, you don't want to break it off when removing the hub... I was unable to free mine from the knuckle, it was seized into place... However, once I had the hub loose, I was able to very carefully pivot the hub to remove it from the knuckle without damaging the plastic ABS sensor. I was successful doing this twice (had a defective wheel hub the first time around...)
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
BTW, if you live in an area that cars rust, be prepared to have a struggle prying the hub loose from the steering knuckle... I resorted to using a high-grade steel bolt and nuts though the brake caliper mounting bracket that pressed against the rotor. It made a heck of a noise when it finally broke the bond... I used an old used brake pad between the bolt and rotor to protect it.
Ah, that's what everybody says. This is one of the reasons I want to make sure it's the hub before I go ahead and struggle with it. At worst case, I suppose I can take the whole knuckle off, set it on two 4x4"s and beat the hub out from behind with the help of penetration oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Another problem you can run into is the ABS wheel speed sensor. The end of the sensor sits inside the wheel bearing hub, you don't want to break it off when removing the hub...
I removed the ABS sensor once to repair the CV axle a couple of years ago. I didn't have to remove it but didn't know. When I put it back, I cleaned it quite well, so hopefully it's not frozen yet.
 

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I removed the ABS sensor once to repair the CV axle a couple of years ago. I didn't have to remove it but didn't know. When I put it back, I cleaned it quite well, so hopefully it's not frozen yet.
If you were able to remove your ABS sensor the first time without too much difficulty, that may bode well for not having too much trouble separating the hub from the steering knuckle.

I used anti-seize compound when I replaced my hub the first time, but I still had some difficulty removing it 3 years later... It still came off easier the second time, and no loud noise when it released, it just sorta separated after a moderate effort. I would have expected it to release easily with the anti-seize treatment... I guess the combination of heat from the brakes and salted northeast roads tend to seize it to the knuckle...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
@"MuranoSL2003 - Thanks for the tips. So your second hub only lasted for 3 years?
I also noticed that you bought a new '19 Murano. I probably will not buy another Nissan for a while after owning an '02 Maxima and the '05 Murano, both bought new. The quality after Renault merger is not how it used to be and my '05 is worse than '02. I have had almost all common 1st gen Murano problems except for CVT failure(, yet) at 141K miles. I could have easily spent thousand$ more if I hadn't worked on it myself.
 

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The first one I gambled and bought a discounted Timken hub off Amazon. It was supposedly new, with only a minor blemish... However, when I receive it, it did appear to have been mounted previously (minor markings on a mounting surface...). It looked brand new otherwise. I complained to Amazon, and they refunded my money, and didn't ask me to return it. I gambled and installed it anyway. It was a lot quieter than my old noisy one, but it hummed faintly at speed of 35-45 MPH. After 3 years it got on my nerves, and I didn't want it to fail at an inopportune time, so I replaced it with another new one which was quiet.

Regarding separating the hub from the knuckle. I found that penetrating oil (Liquid Wrench and PB Blaster) did little good. When I finally broke the bond I noticed virtually no oil had penetrated... I had beat it medium size BFH with it on the car for awhile, but that was unsuccessful. Hopefully your idea of beating on it while off the car will be much easier... I damaged 2 gear pullers (stretched threads) before finally having success with a simple hardened bolt and nut (I found a reference to this idea either here or elsewhere else on the Internet.)

I'm happy with Nissan quality, the only thing out the the norm I had to replace during 57K miles was the hub. Though I think the power steering hose had just begun to leak when I traded it in (found some oil dripping for the first time, traced it to the firewall.) Oh, that reminds me of why I traded it in, the darn front subframe was almost rotted through from AC condensate... But from my research, the front subframe rusting out is fairly rare. So, for the amount of miles I drive each year, it's a reliable car. It seems like the first gen Murano had more than its share of issues, especially if your one to keep it for 100 or 200 thousand miles, or 16 years like me.

I'll be keeping a close eye for subframe rust on my 2019, and addressing it promptly before it gets out of control.

I love my 2019 with all its tech! And the gas mileage is at least 10-15% better than my 2003. I averaged 33 MPG on a 50 mile round trip to the coast. A combination of back roads, Interstate, and beach roads. I think my 2003 would only gotten 27 MPG at best for the same trip.

This is my 4th Nissan. I had a 86 Pathfinder SE, a 2000 Maxima SE, and a 2003 Murano. My previous cars were several Toyotas, and my first car was a 67 Mercury Cougar as a teen. Boy was that car ever a piece of junk! The only feature that worked well was its vacuumed powered retractable headlights. lol
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So I finally replaced the front right hub bearing yesterday. Removal of the old hub wasn't bad. There are 4 mounting bolts holding the hub to the knuckle. I first unscrewed the bolts out by about 3/8" and then hammer the bolts from the back. The gap appeared after just a few knocks. I also remove the 2 mounting bolts from the strut bracket to make room for hammering. As MuranoSL2003 said, the hub had no play but after it's removed, I could definitely feel that it's not smooth and I could hear some noise when spinning it.
 

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Glad to hear yours came loose much easier than mine did.

Where are you located? I would guess it's not in the rust belt? Or maybe the method you choose was the key for breaking the bond to the knuckle.

Thank you for the update, it will help others who tackle this repair -- good job!
 

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Glad to hear yours came loose much easier than mine did.

Where are you located? I would guessing it's not in the rust belt? Or maybe the method you choose was the key for breaking the bond to the knuckle.

Thank you for the update, it will help others who tackle this repair -- good job!
That method is useful if you don't have a slide hammer handy--it works in the rust belt too although I wouldn't back them out quite that far before hammering to lessen the chance of damaging threads. It's amazing how a little rust can make such a simple job so aggravating.
 

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It almost seems like a type of molecular bond caused by the relatively high torque of the hub bolts combined with the heat from the brakes and spinning hub.... Once the bond is broken there's no real sign of rust in between, though I'm sure a little salt may magnify the bond...

I used a coating of anti-size compound when I placed mine, but I still experienced some difficulty when I had to replace it again several years later... It wasn't nearly as difficult as the first time though.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
@MuranoSL2003, I live in central NJ. We do get a fair share of salty roads in winter. My 02 Maxima was so rusted that the center of radiator support beam broke and caused engine support to drop. It didn't touch ground but I realized I didn't want to drive it and junked it.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That method is useful if you don't have a slide hammer handy--it works in the rust belt too although I wouldn't back them out quite that far before hammering to lessen the chance of damaging threads. It's amazing how a little rust can make such a simple job so aggravating.
Good catch. I actually meant to say 3/16". 3/8" would be too far and unnecessary since I could use a pry bar to do the rest.
 

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Thank you for the update.

I feel your pain, I had to ditch my 2003 Murano in February for a similar severe rust problem. In my case it was the front suspension subframe/engine cradle. It rusted from the inside out due to air conditioner condensate dripping into it for 16 years. I didn't notice it until the subframe started falling apart, revealing all the rust on the inside. By the time I discovered it the situation was dangerous, the front left suspension could of collapsed at any moment from a fast freeway exit or a large pothole, so I traded it ASAP.
 
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