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Wife mentions that car suddenly started making loud noise when heating was on. Was fine I the morning in the evening loud rattling that got louder as you increase the fan intensity. Today I dropped the glove box and dropped the blower motor to find a dead mouse in the white cage.
i discarded little Mickey, vacuumed out the small debris. ( a few leaves and a small twig), and reinstalled it. The third screew ia hard to get in but I got it after 5-6 tries. How would a field mouse get into the blower motor ?
FYI I don’t live in a rural setting, but we do have some nice nature areas not too far.
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Poor little guy. Looks like his paw got mangled. My guess would be that it climbed in through maybe a floor heating duct under the seat, or perhaps even the forward vents. Mice can squeeze into a 1/4" diameter hole. Since that fan assembly looks plastic, I bet it was able to squeeze itself between the blades, but then became trapped once inside and maybe didn't have enough time to gnaw its way out before the fan was used and it probably did him in. Looks like some chewing happened along the edge of the fan. BTW, my contention is that from the outside of the fan, there was less room, so the mouse was able to use its rear legs to push off against sides in order to part the blades. Once inside, there's more space that might prevent it from being able to leg press its way out.

The only other access I can think of might be that plastic housing near the front that, I think, funnels fresh air to the heating system. I don't know the system on my 2021 like I did in my 2003, so I can't really say for sure.
 

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Yeah not cool. I am so surprised that even now car manufactures have no clue how to solve that almost century long problem of how to stop ingress of mice into cars!
Especially when the cure is so so simple. I just don't get it. Depending where you are located mice can also mean some nasty diseases like Hantavirus ( CDC - Hantavirus)
so be careful.
 

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Yeah not cool. I am so surprised that even now car manufactures have no clue how to solve that almost century long problem of how to stop ingress of mice into cars!
Especially when the cure is so so simple. I just don't get it. Depending where you are located mice can also mean some nasty diseases like Hantavirus ( CDC - Hantavirus)
so be careful.
To stop mice from coming in thru the upper air intake for the Climate Control unit you need to cover the air intake openings under the lower windshield plastic cowling.

After removing both wiper arms, carefully remove the center windshield cowling. Cover the stamped oval openings in the firewall with pieces of metal window screen. Cut the screen to shape, about 1" larger then the opening. Fold and crimp the screen over 1/2" to form a double edge of screen.

Clean the area around the opening and apply a bead of exterior grade silicone. Press the screen into place letting the silicone ooze thru the double layer of screen. Smooth and clean up any excessive silicone.

Most high-end cars have a snap in screen in these opening to keep any debris out of the CC unit.

While under there, be sure to clean all the dead leaves that have worked their way past the wiper posts. This is a chore that I have to do yearly, after the fall leaves have finished falling, to my wife's car, because of where she has to park at work.

Have a good day.
 

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I have also seen some cars where they come in around where the hood hinges go into the hiding place they reside in. Like I said they the car manufactures don't have a clue. You, us, we, me should not have to jump through those hoops to fix something that we paid hugely for to have it designed the right way in the first place.
 

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After removing both wiper arms, carefully remove the center windshield cowling. Cover the stamped oval openings in the firewall with pieces of metal window screen. Cut the screen to shape, about 1" larger then the opening. Fold and crimp the screen over 1/2" to form a double edge of screen.

Clean the area around the opening and apply a bead of exterior grade silicone. Press the screen into place letting the silicone ooze thru the double layer of screen. Smooth and clean up any excessive silicone.
I wouldn't use normal window screening, since under certain conditions it could rust and cause a mess. I'd go with a copper mesh that's typically used for attic exclusions for bats and flying squirrels. It won't rust. I'll have to pull that cowl to see what you're talking about...
 

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I bought some screen a year ago from Home depot, it is a coated aluminum screen it has set outside for a long time and shows no corrosion etc. copper would tarnish and cause galvanic action if in contact with bare steel, but it would be easy to work with.
 

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The aluminum and not galvanized is much better. Once you cut through (or scratch) the galvanized coating, rust is only a matter of time. The thin mesh used for patio door and window screens are pointless, since rodents can chew right through it. I've used copper mesh and copper coils for decades without any patina'ing taking place. I've used coiled copper and coiled stainless steel together to jam up into house and shed corners so rodents couldn't crawl up inside, and there's been no galvanic activity or corrosion after nearly ten years, and I live in a saltwater air environment.

I'm not sure what the oval holes are that PaulDay is talking about, but I'm assuming they're painted/coated to protect the metal, so it shouldn't be a problem unless the metal screen or copper mesh scraps or penetrates that coating and leaves it exposed to air/water. I don't think there'd be a potential issue using copper unless the metal was bare, in which case I think rust would be a bigger concern, especially during the winter months with powdery road salt getting into everything. Copper mesh and coils are easier to use and form into various places, but if corrosion is a concern between opposing metals, spray painting the copper mesh should solve thet problem. In the end, use whatever works well and is the least amount of work to install and then to remove if you need to perform maintenance.
 

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I bought some screen a year ago from Home depot, it is a coated aluminum screen it has set outside for a long time and shows no corrosion etc. copper would tarnish and cause galvanic action if in contact with bare steel, but it would be easy to work with.

Actually, anytime you have 2 dissimilar metals in contact there is a galvanic reaction commonly referred to as electrolysis. In effect, when two dissimilar metals are in contact and moisture is introduced you have a battery and current (albeit very low).
 

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Just to add, the areas are painted, so there's no metal to metal contact to cause a corrosion issue.

Also, mice will not chew thru the screen, unless there's already a tear. Smoothing and pressing the screen thru the silicon prevents an edge that the mice can't get a grip on and get their claws under the edge of the screen. They're opportunist creatures that give up easily, except if they smell food and then all bets are off.

If you're really anal about a corrosion issue with the screen material, after bending over the edges, lightly spray the screen with automotive clearcoat and let dry before installing.

I've had to do this to my last 5 cars and my sister's 3 cars (She parks in an old converted barn to garage. No way to keep the mice out.) without any mice getting past the homemade screening that was installed.

Have a good day.
 
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