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Can anyone tell me off the top of their head how big the sub is? I'm not an audiophile and don't know whether to measure the outside diameter or inside diameter to get the industry standard for its size. Unlike many others, I actually LIKE the Bose system and the fullness of the bass. I've been told, however, that the best minimum size to have is a 10".

We want to replace the sub in our Frontier (get rid of the "fake" Rockford Fosgate) and put in a Phoenix Gold sub.
 

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I believe it's a 10" sub stock. I know now I have 2 12" Alpine Type Rs so bass isn't a problem :D :D
 

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Well, if you've ever gone to a home audio store and seen the cutout/plexiglass disply of the Bose Sub - it is a multi-woofer/multi chamber design. It is very small in perspective to the size most of us will compare it to. I'd guess maybe a 6"-7" woofer in the home sub. I can't imagine the one in ours is much bigger considering where it is mounted. It isn't big around and it isn't very deep.
 

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Well the home system box is not a subwoofer.
The crossover is way too high.
It really is just a woofer or mid bass.
I run one of these systems in my home .
Like most small woofers, placement is critical.
I have mine in a Corner. That's where max bass is
developed.



As to the Murano. I don't know.
I know that if you want more bass, you can start by not piling stuff on top of the Sub blocking it.

In my Murano, I have a layer of pressed wood, a "Tool" layer, a "Floor" layer and a rubberized Cargo layer.
It's a wonder any sound makes it past all that blockage.

Homer
 

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I think the sub is a 6 3/4" DVC "sub". I would actually call it a mid-woofer simply because of it's size. If you look on the top panel of the Bose sub in the spare wheel, you will see six or so nuts. Take those off and you'll see the sub.
 

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Sub Woofer

I have my bass control set in the middle and notice that the bass vibrates from the rear floor area where the sub woofer is located up to the front floor area and I feel the vibration on the gas and brake pedal and floor area...very annoying. I have an Acura that also has a Bose nd sub-woofer on the rear shelf but is so well insulated that you never feel any vibration. Nissan dealer says he can add insulation in the spare tire well, but I have my doubts about the result...any thoughts?
 

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I have thoughts...

The sub is bolted to the spare tire. The spare tire is bolted to the floor. The sub vibrates the tire - the tire vibrates the floor. I can't imagine there is much you can do to avoid this unless you were to isolate the sub from the tire somehow. Low frequency vibrations are going to happen. I have the bass set almost flat - might be on 1 - just because it does get too boomy when turned up.
 

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leads on subwoofer

I just took apart the bose sub woofer because I was thinking about replacing the speaker. I noticed there were four leads coming from the speaker to the wiring harness. Does anyone know why there are four instead the usual two?
 

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The sub most likely has whats called a dual voice coil. It is common in the audio industry to extract more power from amps. The lower the impedance=more power going to sub.

1 DVC driver with Voice Coils in Series
Connecting the two voice coils of the driver in series (+ to -) will result in the following impedances:
Dual-6 Ohm Subwoofer: 12 Ohms
Dual-4 Ohm Subwoofer: 8 Ohms
Dual-2 Ohm Subwoofer: 4 Ohms

1 DVC driver with Voice Coils in Parallel
Connecting the two voice coils of the driver in parallel (+ to +, - to -) will result in the following impedances:
Dual-6 Ohm Subwoofer: 3 Ohms
Dual-4 Ohm Subwoofer: 2 Ohms
Dual-2 Ohm Subwoofer: 1 Ohms

If you measure both sets of +/- terminals on the sub, usually the ohms reading on the multimeter is a little lower than what the actual impedance of the sub is.

Parallel:
 

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So basically it's just a jumper for an added terminal on the opposite side of the magnet? Is that where the extra power comes from, just less resistance across the magnet?
 

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I dont think it has anything to do with the magnet, though I could be wrong. I do know that the magnet controls the voice coil movement though. It's the actual voice coil that has different windings in it that created the impedance of the subwoofer.
 

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I am surprised the sound that comes from it considering it's size, but I would still like to replace it. Does anyone know if it's possible to use the existing harness and wire up a different sub, or would I have to go with adding an amp in the back along with a new sub... My main concern is quality of sound. I don't need anything obnoxious or too loud, I just like to have a deep clean bass from my stereo.
 

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I would expect it's got two windings because it's a cheap way of combining left and right into one speaker.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Dave N said:
FWIW

The Bose subwoofer size is 5.25".
Thanx mucho Dave.
 

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EdMPT said:
I am surprised the sound that comes from it considering it's size, but I would still like to replace it. Does anyone know if it's possible to use the existing harness and wire up a different sub, or would I have to go with adding an amp in the back along with a new sub... My main concern is quality of sound. I don't need anything obnoxious or too loud, I just like to have a deep clean bass from my stereo.
The amp is custom-tuned for the frequency response characteristics of the Bose speaker that is in that bass box. More than likely, if you swap to a different speaker it will sound worse, plus there's a risk that damage to the amp and/or speaker could occur. If you're really wanting to change out components, your best bet is to go with a complete aftermarket set up so that the components can be properly matched up.

I hope that helps.

Dave N
 

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jaak said:
I would expect it's got two windings because it's a cheap way of combining left and right into one speaker.
This is wrong!!!

The signals to each voice coil must match each other. If you were to wire the left signal to one and the right signal to another, any time the signals were differen't the voice coils would be trying to move independently of one another. Since they are connected to the same cone, it couldn't move accurately.

Many manufacturers make dual voice coil subwoofers. It's done mostly to give people more possibilities when wiring, therefore matching the impedance of the system to the optimal performance range for the amplifier.
 
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