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Has anyone else noticed their rear brake pads go before the front?

I was taking a look today and noticed I've still got some front pads but my rears are in need of replacement.

I've never had this happen in any other car I've owned. Always front went before rear.

Just wondering if this is anything to do with Nissans electronic brake force distribution system or if I have an issue with my rear brake setup. All brakes are still from factory. Car has just under 50,000km...
 

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Nissan and other larger vehicles use a rear brake bias to prevent too much nose dive under normal braking. Most of us don’t slam on the brakes all the time, so the bias is to engage the rears first. I noticed this for the first time on my 2010. Never had this issue on any sedan or wagon before.
 

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During the post-sale inspection of my 2018 SL, when I asked about the condition of the brakes, the service technician mentioned that the rear brake pads showed a little more wear than the front, although neither would need to replaced for a while.
 

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During the post-sale inspection of my 2018 SL, when I asked about the condition of the brakes, the service technician mentioned that the rear brake pads showed a little more wear than the front, although neither would need to replaced for a while.
That's normal for Muranos. In most cars the fronts wear faster, but in the Murano, it's the rears. Pads and rotors are also a fairly simply DIY job when the time comes.
 

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Has anyone else noticed their rear brake pads go before the front?

I was taking a look today and noticed I've still got some front pads but my rears are in need of replacement.

I've never had this happen in any other car I've owned. Always front went before rear.

Just wondering if this is anything to do with Nissans electronic brake force distribution system or if I have an issue with my rear brake setup. All brakes are still from factory. Car has just under 50,000km...
Yup, I'm at 51,000KM and my rear brakes are about 20%-30% left.
 

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Nissan and other larger vehicles use a rear brake bias to prevent too much nose dive under normal braking. Most of us don’t slam on the brakes all the time, so the bias is to engage the rears first. I noticed this for the first time on my 2010. Never had this issue on any sedan or wagon before.
Old school, I still pump the brake pedal once when applying the brakes. After a little testing, I've come to the conclusion that doing this prevents the rear bias when braking. I don't seem to suffer from the rear pads being worn before the front.

The past several days I've just pressed steady on the brake pedal coming to a stop when exiting the highway. Two things I've noticed: Seems to take a little longer to stop and almost no nose dive no matter how hard I press the pedal, short of jamming on it.

My normal stopping style when coming to a planned stop is to quickly pump the pedal once just until I feel resistance, let off and then apply the pedal with a firm steady pressure until almost a complete stop and then release pressure to glide to a smooth stop. I definitely feel like the car stops in a shorter distance.

Have a good day.
 

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Another factor that has accelerated brake wear (especially rear brake wear) in certain late model vehicles is the change to electronic brake proportioning. The proportioning valve that normally reduces hydraulic pressure to the rear brakes has been eliminated so the rear brakes will handle a higher percentage of the brake load and be more aggressive. The antilock brake system performs the job of brake proportioning by keeping an eye on how the rear brakes are behaving. If the rear brakes start to lock up when braking hard, the ABS system kicks in and cycles pressure to the rear wheels to prevent them from skidding.

This approach helps the vehicle stop in a shorter distance, but also increases rear brake wear dramatically. This means the rear brakes will often wear out before the front brakes.

Source
 
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