Nissan Murano Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,285 Posts
Good.
Nissan needs to be hammered over this.
The "silent partnership" with the thieves needs to be brought out into the open.

Homer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
You sure? its a free news site, dont think you need to login. But here is the article:


Car maker sued over light thefts

Nissan kept consumers in the dark, N.J. says


Tuesday, March 09, 2004


BY GEORGE E. JORDAN
Star-Ledger Staff

New Jersey yesterday sued Nissan North American for allegedly failing to warn consumers about the epidemic theft of high-intensity headlights on its Maximas.

The lawsuit also accuses Nissan of profiteering from the sale of headlight replacements, which cost $1,800 a pair, and anti-theft devices that the state said should have been provided for free.


"Nissan knew that its headlights were being stolen from its cars and did not notify consumers," said state Attorney General Peter Harvey. "These were being stolen with impunity, in some cases in less then 90 seconds."

The lawsuit in Superior Court in Somerset County makes New Jersey the first state to take action against an automobile manufacturer in the rash of thefts occurring around the nation of bright, blue-tinted headlights, also known as xenon lights.

The lights have joined fancy rims and expensive sound systems on the list of car accessories coveted by thieves. The burgeoning black market for xenon bulbs has law enforcement officials across the country searching for ways to stop the thefts, which are targeted mostly at 2002 and 2003 Maximas.

New Jersey's lawsuit, meanwhile, accuses Nissan of violating the state's Consumer Fraud Act and seeks restitution of an undetermined amount of insurance premiums and repair costs. The company said it had taken efforts to help consumers.

"While nothing can completely eliminate the thefts of parts from vehicles, we believe the proactive steps taken by Nissan will help deter criminals from stealing headlights from our customers' Maximas," the company's statement read.

Nissan recently launched an identification program in Massachusetts and Connecticut, where Maxima owners can have an identification number printed on a small chip affixed to their highlights so law enforcement can recognize stolen headlights in auto chop shops.

Company spokesman John Schilling declined comment on the core allegations in New Jersey's lawsuit: The automaker knew about the pattern of thefts long before it warned customers and offered a free securing kit that provided less protection than the anti-theft kit customers had to purchase.

A survey by New Jersey officials found 756 thefts or attempted thefts of the moon-blue lights from 2002 or 2003 Maximas over the past two years. Newark led the state with 277, followed by Bloomfield with 135, Jersey City with 108 and Butler with 50.

The total included 50 pairs of headlights stolen in December from a Nissan dealership on Route 22 in Hillside.

Hillside police Capt. John Frize said thieves made off with the equipment in less than an hour, causing about $200,000 in damage. "I really don't know what could be done to stop this. I just know, and I've also heard from other agencies, that it takes as little as 10 to 12 seconds to get the assembly out," he said. "All you've got to do is put in a crowbar, pry it, snip the plastic and metal, and you got it."

Jose Cabezudo, an emergency room assistant at Mountainside Hospital, said the headlights were stolen from his 2002 Maxima on two separate occasions, once outside a movie theater and the second time in Mountainside's parking lot.

"My insurance paid for the repairs, but that's not the point," he said. "It's traumatizing when you come out of work and your headlights are gone. It's a hassle. I don't even drive the car. My car is in a garage. It's not safe anywhere."

After the second theft, Cabezudo said, he unsuccessfully pleaded with Nissan to install the cheaper, less-coveted halogen light bulbs. "I was willing to install some other headlight, but they said all they could do was install the same lights," he said.

High Intensity Discharge headlights emit light so close to sunlight that it looks blue. They provide about three times the light output of standard halogen headlights while using less energy and generating less heat.

The special bulb has no filament like the conventional halogen light bulb. Instead, the light is created by high-voltage electricity that charges xenon gas between the two electrodes inside a sealed tube.

The thieves, authorities said, resell the stolen bulbs on the street to street racers and car modification enthusiasts who view the piercing blue glow is a status symbol.

Nissan said it began an anti-theft initiative last fall, sending letters to consumers informing them that they can bring their Maximas to a dealer where a bracket would be installed, free of charge, to make the headlights more difficult to steal.

But the lawsuit alleges that a year earlier -- Sept. 26, 2002 -- a service bulletin went to its technicians about an anti-theft connector kit available for headlight assemblies damaged by theft.

Two months later, the complaint alleges, Nissan sent out another bulletin to service reps informing them that a $175 anti-theft deterrent was available "if a customer requests" and "for customer pay only."

The lawsuit does not name other automakers whose headlights also are frequently stolen, including Acura, Audi, BMW, Lexus, Porshe and Mercedes-Benz.



George E. Jordan can be reached at [email protected] or (973) 392-1801.
 

·
Custom Knife Creations
Joined
·
293 Posts
Sorry, but I don't agree.. do you see Toyota warning customers that there car is the #1 car stolen in 2002?? (I don't have the 2003 stats handle, so I'm using it as an example)

the consumers have some responsibility to protect thier own property once they buy it..

Hell. check with your insurance when you buy the car, and ask why it's classified when you buy it..


"ignorance is bliss" will only get you so far..

FYI: the HID lights are comparable in price to other manufactures for replacement costs.. (from what I can see)

" that it takes as little as 10 to 12 seconds to get the assembly out," he said. "All you've got to do is put in a crowbar, pry it, snip the plastic and metal, and you got it"

what about airbag thefts.. this is a common problem, not one specific to a certain manufacturer or certain part..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
The 1989 Toyota Camry is the most stolen vehicle in the US.

I think the lawsuit is based on the fact that Nissan is charging people for the device, that should have been installed from the begining to deter any thefts of the lights.

Honestly, I think it is just another way for people to push the blame for their mistakes onto big business. We will one day live in a world with only one product to choose from. between the lawsuits for hot coffee and super size french fries, I dont know what this world is coming to.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
Is coming to America............it is called CAPITALISM..............or what lawyer made out of this……..

I wish I was @^#%$, I could sue my parents for it, who in turn could sue the obstetrician, who would sue his teachers, who would………….am I getting insane?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
Oh geez :rolleyes:

While I think it would be a good idea for Nissan to take measures to better protect those headlamps, they are hardly libel for their theft. Darryl's point about Camry's is right on point.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
If anything, Murano owners should consider suing Nissan for making such outrageous fuel consumption claims. I bought this vehicle largely based on the great mileage claims. Basically, I feel I was lied to by Nissan just so they could make a sale.

Wasn’t there a suit filed against Hyundai for a similar issue ??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Skibum, how long have you had your MO? I seem to be getting better gas milage with each new tank, compared to when I first got the MO 6 months ago :)
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
5,268 Posts
I do not think you could win case of fuel consumption. Remember it is only estimate based on certain standards. And to be perfectly honets I do get the milage claimed by Nissan. So I am happy. What I would change is the quality if the interior.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
It’s a 2004 model and I picked it up on New Years Eve. Perhaps I’m being over zealous in wanting better mileage so soon, however I do most of my driving on the highway and was just hoping it would be a little better. I traded in my 2001-4L Jeep TJ, which had the gas mileage of a Sherman Tank, I just thought I’d see more of a difference.

Also, I just wanted to thank everyone here for helping me decide on the Murano. I religiously followed this forum, as well as others for BMW, Mercedes and Audi for months before I bought, and over all I’m very happy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
149 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Glad to hear Skibum, I too was upset at first of the milage, was gonna buy a gas station :) but it is much better now. I drive stop and go for short distances and some highway and get between 18-22 mpg up from 13-15 mpg at first :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
Speed and hills on the highway matter a lot. At 80+ mph, I got between 18-20 mpg (varied due to hills). Wind resistance really gets you at highspeed. Doing more normal 55 - 65 mph driving in cruise control on the highway, I get between 24 and 26. These numbers are actually better than quoted. For my daily commute I get worse mileage on the highway than I would if I was just driving around town. I can usually get 20 - 22 around town, but the slow and go on the highway puts me at 18 - 19 mpg. I hate traffic.

BTW, I have a picture of my MPG computer reading 99.9 mpg. I got that by reseting it shortly after crossing the New Mexico/Colorado border on my way back to Denver. It's a big hill there that is just the right angle to coast down and stay at the legal speed :D . It soon dropped back down to 25 mpg after I started having to use the gas again.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top