Nissan Murano Forum banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I am about to take a trip to Montana and may well hit snow.

Has anyone bought and USED chains on their MO?

Any problems? Recommendations?

Thanks,

Ray
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
I have used the Security low profile chains. They work fine (front wheels only!)
 

·
Major Geek
Joined
·
636 Posts
I took a trip to Sequoia National Forest in February to take a snowshoeing tour through the woods. For the last 10 miles of the trip, you see constant reminders "YOU MUST INSTALL CHAINS IN (x) MILES". We were in a rented 4x4 Trailblazer EXT. Drove right past the "CHAINS REQUIRED BEYOND THIS POINT" signs without any chains, and didn't have one lick of a problem. 45 minutes of hairpin turns, often without a barrier, and we were fine. I think those signs were up for the Californians who wouldn't know the first thing about driving in snow, because it certainly posed no threat to this Jersey Boy/Pennsyltucky Transplant. And that was with a Chevy 4x4 on all-weather tires.

If you have AWD and VDC, it'll feel like a summer day if you're riding on halfway decent rubber. If you poke around here, you'll find pics documenting that point at which a member turned around with his Mo, but I don't recall if he had AWD or not and VDC or not. I seriously think you'll have more problems with snowpack in the CVT intake before you have problems with traction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
Unless you're off-roading, and the Murano really isn't designed for that, why would you need chains?

Eatern PA, just curious why having snow in the CVT scoop/intake would be a problem? Because I expect to have it happen often where I live? Isn't the purpose of the scoop to keep the tranny cool?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,329 Posts
dUnless you're off-roading, and the Murano really isn't designed for that, why would you need chains?

Try getting out of a 30 degree driveway that is covered with 9" of alternate layer of snow and ice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
California sometimes requires chains, even on AWD and 4WD vehicles.

Hope that I never get in a position to have to use them, but just in case it would be nice to know what chains others have used and what fits/works well.

Thanks,

Ray
 

·
Major Geek
Joined
·
636 Posts
bruno said:
Eatern PA, just curious why having snow in the CVT scoop/intake would be a problem? Because I expect to have it happen often where I live? Isn't the purpose of the scoop to keep the tranny cool?
It is, but with air, not with water, and if your cooler gets packed with snow, the cooler won't get be getting any water, but it won't be getting any air, either.

There's a story around here about a board member who lost control of her car and spun it around during a tropical downpour in Florida. Unfortunately, after the wipeout, her car wouldn't move and had to be towed to the shop. Her CVT shut down when too much water got up into the cooler during her spinout.

My town is half-buried in floodwaters today, and this discussion just reminded me that I can't even go through floodwaters that are up to the bottom of my doorsil, as I used to with my xterra. I would worry too much about shoving water up into the cooler.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
This cooler by itself is simply a scoop redirecting fresh air to the CVT external case. Mud could pack up there and isolate the CVT making it overheat. Water? Don't know what it would other than to better cool the CVT as water has a much higher heat dissipation factor than air. Ice and snow will only melt when the CVT is at running temperature. So, the thing is to simply include this scooped cooler in your cleaning procedure using a hose or pressure washer.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
155 Posts
Hmmm. I'm not too worried about my Murano having a snow packed cooling scoop, especially when the ambient temp is also generally 0 degrees and coooler, much cooler for much of the year. I take your point about mud though, best keep it clean.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,368 Posts
I might be repeating what has already been posted, but for the life of me I cannot imagine how snow packed into the CVT cooler scoop would adversely affect the transmission at all. As stated above, water has a much higher specific heat than air, which means it is a better coolant than air passing through the scoop. If anything, I think it would be better for cooling the CVT fluid. Remember the cooler is just a passive heat sink. EasternPA - while I would not recommend driving in water as high as your doorsill (that would be about 8"), I doubt water touching the bottom of the CVT pan would affect it at all.


I do not recall in the "spinout" post, that the vehicle stopped running because of water or snow getting on the CVT cooling fins. I cannot see how this would possibly affect the transmission. If I remember correctly, that driver, having already known that her tires were wearing unevenly, drove fast in the rain, leading to a spinout when she drove too quickly for the road conditions.

BTW - the owners manual recommends S class chains for the front wheels only. I wonder how this would affect the VDC system.

Update - I read that post again and there was absolutely no mention that mud in the cooling scoop or fins caused the transmission to fail. It was more likely she spun her wheels in the mud which caused the CVT to enter failsafe mode. This is something that can happen in any Nissan with an automatic transmission, and not an exclusive phenomenon of the CVT.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
828 Posts
I'm wondering if there is any improvement for the CVT cooler scoop in the 05 model?
 

·
Major Geek
Joined
·
636 Posts
Update - I read that post again and there was absolutely no mention that mud in the cooling scoop or fins caused the transmission to fail
Sorry I wasn't clear. I was trying to describe an old post that described an engine running but dead CVT after taking in water (not mud). This was from I hydroplaned on the interstate in my mo:
at the dealership they said it has sucked in some water and that shuts down the engine so it doesn't damage it and that's all the happend
She said her engine was still running after the hydroplane and spinout, but the CVT wouldn't work at all, requiring the tow, so the engine never really did shut down. I don't know if there are any exposed parts deep inside the scoop, so I was just theorizing based on what she described and her dealer said. She took in water and her CVT temporarily shut down.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,368 Posts
EasternPA said:
Sorry I wasn't clear. I was trying to describe an old post that described an engine running but dead CVT after taking in water (not mud). This was from I hydroplaned on the interstate in my mo:She said her engine was still running after the hydroplane and spinout, but the CVT wouldn't work at all, requiring the tow, so the engine never really did shut down. I don't know if there are any exposed parts deep inside the scoop, so I was just theorizing based on what she described and her dealer said. She took in water and her CVT temporarily shut down.

The scoop is not an intake scoop - i.e. it is not a path into the CVT. Its just a piece of metal to redirect air towards the cooling fins beneath the CVT oil pan. Take a look yourself and you will see what I mean. ;)

Rest assured no water will get into the CVT unless you pour it down the dipstick tube!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
741 Posts
Dennis, from what I heard from Nissan Canada, in a northern country like here, you could very well remove the scoop if you wish and it wouldn't change a thing. It is just an added cooler just in case but remember that the CVT builds a lot less heat than a conventional auto. Maybe in Mexico or in southern CA do they maybe need it during summer but I wouldn't be afraid to remove it here for sure. In any case I just measured 7 1/2 inch clearance at the bottom of the cooler which is better than most sedans and way better than most sport cars. And the scoop by itself may contain not much more than a pint of melting snow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
842 Posts
I find it interesting that the issue on the tranny air scoop has come to the surface again. I too have nailed that scoop twice but have been able to bend it back so that there is air flow across the tranny cooler.

I am wondering if the air scoop is required in the cooler months of the year. I agree that it is probably required during the hot months of summer, but do we need to have on in the winter. This might solved the issue around it getting hit or be full of snow.

I have to ask though, if it is full of snow that the low end of the tranny is not getting hot enough to melt it out.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,136 Posts
SIM said:
It is just an added cooler just in case but remember that the CVT builds a lot less heat than a conventional auto.
I bet you meant to say "more" heat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Dennis - getting snow in the CVT air scoop will not cause problems.

1) Drag - the little bit of snow "plowed" by the scoop pales in comparison to the drag of moving the 4 wheels through deep, wet snow.

2) CVT "sensors" - the torque converter lock up is delayed by a temp sensor...the converter will not lock up until a certain temp is reached...snow in the scoop should, if anything, help the CVT warm up sooner...the delay you noticed is most likely due to the cooler temps on the day you had snow.

3) water - when driving in wet slushy snow, it packs all over under the vehicle....I would think a lot of the water was created by melting snow from all areas underneath the vehicle...
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,368 Posts
I'm not quite that far north, but I do get my fair share of snow in Illinois. My Murano is always garaged, but I do notice that on very cold starts the CVT is a bit sluggish for the first five minutes or so. Once it warms up, much better response. It never really bothered me, since even a sluggish Murano is faster than most vehicles out there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
The Murano is a great cold weather vehicle(love those heated cloth seats)...when -40, most drivers allow their vehicles to warm up 5-10 minutes mostly for interior comfort and to allow proper vision through frosty windows...CVT warms quickly and operates smoother(in my opinion) then a conventional automatic...
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top