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I have been looking at this site for awhile and it allowed me to gain a lot of knowledge to save some $$$. Thought I'd share my experience. Recently had my 06 Murano (2WD) at the dealer for warranty repairs of lower control arms. Passenger side inner CV boot was also torn and grease is ALL over the bottom of the car. Dealer wanted $500 to replace the CV Boot only as it was not covered under warranty (I told him to shove it.) I figured I would just do it myself and below is my experience.

I decided to replace the entire axle since I was going to have to pull it out anyway. I got a remanufactured axle from a local autopart store for $73. I could have gotten one online for $44 but did not have time to wait for shipping.

First, jack up the car and remove the wheel. I then sprayed all of the bolts and nuts I would be removing with PB Blaster. I live in Texas and corrosion is not much of an issue but figured I would make it as easy on myself as possible. I let that sit for abut 15 minutes while I had breakfast.

I started by removing the cotter pins from the outer tie rod and axle nuts. Then I removed the bolt for the wheel sensor and removed the sensor from the hub. Be careful with sensor as it is made of plastic and damages easily (and it is not cheap!). I then removed the axle nut with a 32mm socket and my impact wrench. I then removed the nut from the end of the outer tie rod. You then have to separate the outer tie rod from the steering knuckle. Be careful not to damage the bushing on the tie rod (like I did with my handy pickle fork!, gonna have to replace that next weekend). Then remove the Nut and remove the bolt which holds the ball joint in the Hub housing.

Next, you have to separate the ball joint from the hub assembly. This was a PITA big time. I used a ball joint separator, and guess what, I damaged the bushing on the ball joint as well! Then, you may have to drive the axle back through the Hub using a sledge. Be sure to thread the axle nut back flush onto the threads before hitting it. If you do not, the threads will mushroom and the axle will be useless (even as a core). After that, there are only 3 bolts (and some rust) holding the CV axle in place. They are located just behind the inner CV boot and hold the axle to the frame. Once they are removed, the only thing holding the axle in place is rust. Luckily, mine came out pretty easy. Be careful when removing the axle not to damage the seal which goes into the transmission. Nissan recommends you replace this seal, although, I did not. Once the old axle is out, be sure to swap the dust cover off the old axle onto the new one (If your axle did not come with one). Assembly is the reverse of the steps above. The job took me about 3 hours from start to finish. Hope this may help somebody out who needs to do the same thing.
 

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I'm glad that you were able to change your own axle. Here is a little tip in taking out the ball joints...
Should eliminate any damge to the boot next time. Using the pickel fork or seperator will always tear out the boot. If you're replacing an old one then its ok but with a new one its a no no. With your new oem LCA ball joint (with fluid filled type bushing), it would have been safer for the boot if you remove the other 3 bolts holding your LCA. Then, put a piece of wood close to the ball joint and tap it down with a hammer to remove from the knuckle. Anyways, now, you have the option to just swap out the ball joint itself with a press or change the entire lca. There is a posted diy on this. Good luck. Here's some pix when I replaced my LCAs and left axle seal a year ago.
 

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Man, that video on tapping the side of the ball joint fitting is GREAT!!
 

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Thanks for the info. That would have made it much easier! I think I am going to swap out the ball joint next weekend.
 

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Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!
 

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Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!

HUH? :ucrazy: Whatcha talkin about willis? :8:
 

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Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!
How so? This repair is pretty straightforward...what is the extra risk doing it myself? I wouldn't exactly consider this putting my life on the line.
 

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Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!
I did this repair a few months ago on the wife murano, I even replaced the ball joint and replaced the axle seal while I was at it. I'm no qualified mechanic but enjoy working on my cars. I just replaced the clutch on my porsche. One needs to know their limitation. If you are not confortable, there is always the dealer welcoming your business.
 

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I repeat..."Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!"
 

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I repeat..."Unless you are a qualified mechanic, these types of repairs are best done by a professional. Putting my life on the line to save a few hundred dollars is not my idea of a wise investment!"
I am far from being a qualified mechanic, yet two days ago I replaced the rusty oil pan on my MO, and last year I replaced the front brake pads and rotors, added HID headlights and fogs, and signal mirrors. Over the years I have replaced engines, transmissions, alternators, water pumps, fuel pumps, carbs, radios, springs, etc. Some of these tasks were done to save money, but most were done simply for the satisfaction of doing the job myself. And believe me, I am far from being a qualified mechanic, having spent all of my professional career behind a desk.

Some people, like myself and many other forum members, welcome the challenge of repairing their own vehicles and enjoy the satisfaction of a job well done.

Most mechanical repairs are pretty straight forward if you have helpful guidance, the right tools and confidence in your abilities. I figure if we provide the helpful guidance it is up to the member to determine if he has the necessary tools and ability. We are here to support, not chastise.

-njjoe
 

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Well said njjoe, I am far from being a qualified mechanic myself as well. However, I do like to tinker and do some of my own work. I do my own routine maintenance like oil and brake jobs, then research the rest. If its something I think I can tackle, I do it myself. If not, I take it to a shop or a friend who is more mechanically inclined.
 

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For the lower ball joint, shouldnt it just slide out once the bolt is removed? It looks like its held in place by the bolt and the knuckle closing in around it, instead of pressing itself into the knuckle.

I'll be replacing this axle on our Murano as well in the next week or so, its been slinging grease for a good 50k miles and recently the boot split open completely, but it only really makes noise when its really cold outside haha.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Theoretically, yes. But as I found out, it doesn't just slide out and it is hard to get enough leverage on it to separate it from the hub without damaging the boot. There is a little shoulder on the ball joint LCA end which prevents it from easily separating from the knuckle, especially since that joint will move freely and is not fixed.

You can do like Nitely suggested and remove the other 3 bolts holding the LCA and then, put a piece of wood close to the ball joint and tap it down with a hammer to separate it from the knuckle. This allows you much better angles to separate the joint. Hope this helps.
 

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OK- I got the CV axle out pretty easy-- even the lower ball joint came off the knuckle easily. I removed the three inner bolts and pulled the whole shaft out... But the new CV axle doesn't include the new inner shaft (that goes through the bearing support and into the TC). Is there some secret to separating these shafts?
 

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OK.. Question.. I'm hoping someone gets back to me quickly (fingers crossed)

I have everything removed, Steering Knucle, Brakes, Etc. Ready to pull the passenger side CV axle which I've purchases a rebuilt from AutoZone. Now, it seems on the AWD (unlike the 2WD) you do NOT need to unscrew anything once you have everything free. It seems with the AWD (2006 SL AWD) that the Axle should just slide off once you've remove everything and removal of the Support Bearing Bracket on FAX-9 is only for the FWD model?

At this point I've tried beating the hell out the the back of the axle to get it off and it's not budging. I put Liquid Wrence on but then someone told me about PB Buster so I got a can and resprayed where the axle connects to the transfer case (passenger side) Hoping tomorrow it will had loosened up. But the big question it, which the FAX guide seems to suggest is that I DO NOT have to remove the anything from the dust shield since I'm AWD and the AWD axle is completely different than the FWD only version??

FYI, this is a '06, SL AWD.

Thanks!
 

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OK- I got the CV axle out pretty easy-- even the lower ball joint came off the knuckle easily. I removed the three inner bolts and pulled the whole shaft out... But the new CV axle doesn't include the new inner shaft (that goes through the bearing support and into the TC). Is there some secret to separating these shafts?
you will need to remove the inner boot.
 

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OK.. Question.. I'm hoping someone gets back to me quickly (fingers crossed)

I have everything removed, Steering Knucle, Brakes, Etc. Ready to pull the passenger side CV axle which I've purchases a rebuilt from AutoZone. Now, it seems on the AWD (unlike the 2WD) you do NOT need to unscrew anything once you have everything free. It seems with the AWD (2006 SL AWD) that the Axle should just slide off once you've remove everything and removal of the Support Bearing Bracket on FAX-9 is only for the FWD model?

At this point I've tried beating the hell out the the back of the axle to get it off and it's not budging. I put Liquid Wrence on but then someone told me about PB Buster so I got a can and resprayed where the axle connects to the transfer case (passenger side) Hoping tomorrow it will had loosened up. But the big question it, which the FAX guide seems to suggest is that I DO NOT have to remove the anything from the dust shield since I'm AWD and the AWD axle is completely different than the FWD only version??

FYI, this is a '06, SL AWD.

Thanks!
Stick a flat screwdriver between the transfer case and drive shaft and with a little force it should pop out.
 

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I had to loosen the bolts holding the CV axle in, then remove it completely from the transfer case and then separate it with brute force. No way it was coming easy. Even trying a pull hammer I pulled the inner boot off the axle before the axle came off! So I went with the unscrewing of the plate and removal of the complete axle. PITA!
 

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I ended up doing the same thing.

This part hasn't been made very clear: On the passenger side, there are TWO shafts, joined end-to-end here... the CV axle (outboard, with both CV joints). The outer end of the CV axle has male splines that go through the hub, and the inner end has female splines, which fit over the end of the inner shaft [I'll call this the driveshaft]. The CV axle is about 20" long, and the driveshaft is just slightly shorter (maybe 18"). The driveshaft has the bearing support on it.

This is what I discovered... The shafts are held together with a loose-fitting circlip that fits in a groove about 1/8" from the end of the driveshaft male splines. Fitting the two shafts together, the circlip is compressed, then expands once inside and at the end of the female splines on the CV axle.

Once I removed the three 8mm bolts holding the bearing support, I was able to easily remove both shafts as one unit-- no force required. A few ounces of gear oil spilled out the TC once the driveshaft was removed.

Once removed from the vehicle, I was able to separate the two shafts by prying with a large flat-blade screwdriver. This did wreck the dust boot on the old CV axle, but oh well-- the new CV axle had the new dust boot on it.

Looking back on it, I THINK I could have separated the two shafts the same way, but without removing the bearing support and pulling the driveshaft from the TC. Putting the two shafts back together just took a good, solid rap with a 3-lb. dead-blow hammer. This would have avoided spilling oil from the TC once I removed the driveshaft.

Hope this clarifies things a little. I think I could have done the whole job in a about an hour if I had known this.
 
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