Nissan Murano Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I wonder if others have a similar experience? When driving casually in “D”, the engine always seems to “lug” or is sluggish at 15-30 mph, especially on an uphill incline. So now, I have been shifting it to ”Ds“ (or second gear) when I come to an incline and it does much better. Which leads me to believe that under normal driving, it never seems to use this 2nd “gear” (I know it’s not a gear).
I also have begun on occasion starting in “L”, shift to “Ds“, then D. It seems to perform much better. I don’t know if there are any pros or cons to doing all this manual shifting. I know we shouldn’t have to be do this
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
66 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Didn’t mean to post this yet. I was editing the title and was going to also edit some of the text too, but it somehow posted.
To continue my observation. If others have this same experience, I wonder if this additional strain or “lugging” is causing some of the CVT failures?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,500 Posts
These CVTs are programmed to achieve the best MPG when driving sedately. So long as it's not lugging excessively, and it instantly responds with higher RPMS and speed when the pedal is pressed down to accelerate, then its operating as designed. I don't think the lugging contributes to early CVT failure...
 

·
Registered
2003 Nissan Murano SE AWD
Joined
·
333 Posts
This video was uploaded in December and gives a great look at all the components of the CVT and how things interact with one another. By far, the best video I've seen on this subject.

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,667 Posts
These CVTs are programmed to achieve the best MPG when driving sedately. So long as it's not lugging excessively, and it instantly responds with higher RPMS and speed when the pedal is pressed down to accelerate, then its operating as designed. I don't think the lugging contributes to early CVT failure...
The whole point of most modern transmissions is to keep the engine RPM as low as possible and to lock up the clutch in the torque converter while doing it. That creates a direct mechanical drive that keeps RPM low and relies on torque to keep the vehicle moving.

A little theorizing here...others will comment...

I believe that many (possibly most) modern engines are designed less for HP than used to be the case, and more to produce torque. Without my researching it, if you start comparing engines of similar displacement (say, a 300 cubic inch V8) with a similar engine of 20 years ago, my impression is that you'll find the newer engine generates more torque. Of course, they often make more HP, too. The torque numbers for modern engines are surprising. It used to be that you wouldn't get much power out of a 4 or 6 cylinder engine until you were above 3000 RPM...now that happens at lower speeds.

Our 2016 Jeep with the 5.7L Hemi V8 cruises at highway speeds UNDER 2000 RPM. You know they're keeping that V8 from revving higher to keep the gas mileage up. I've seen many newer cars that are real strong up to about 40 MPH, but run out of steam when they hit 60-70 MPH and are slow to accelerate above that speed.
 

·
Registered
2003 Nissan Murano SE AWD
Joined
·
333 Posts
Didn’t mean to post this yet. I was editing the title and was going to also edit some of the text too, but it somehow posted.
To continue my observation. If others have this same experience, I wonder if this additional strain or “lugging” is causing some of the CVT failures?
You might want to check out this revelation...
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top