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Has anyone here tried ENEOS CVT fluid yet??? i was just wondering because their website tells the compatibilty of their CVT fluid with most CVT Trani vehicles... It does have Nissan Murano but i just wanted to know that if some1 has practically used it yet! If yes then how was the result??? Any problem at all??? looking forward for replies!
 

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nissanlover said:
Has anyone here tried ENEOS CVT fluid yet???
nissanlover-

Welcome to the forum!

Last year there was a lengthy discussion on this topic and the general consensus was that it was not worth the risk to use this unapproved fluid.

Here's a link to that thread: Click Here

I had sent an email to Nippon Oil requesting confirmation of compatibility. The following email is from Satoru (Steve) MATSUMURA from Nippon Oil (USA) Limited in Torrance, CA:

Dear Joe,

Thank you for your inquiry about our product.
Here is my answers to your questions.

1) ENEOS CVT Fluid is compatible with Xtronic CVT. (is NOT compatible with Xtroid CVT.)
2) ENEOS CVT Fluid is not approved by Nissan. However, this product has been tested by Nippon Oil, been marketed in Japan for more than 3 years and been sold to many Nissan cars there.

If you have further questions, please feel free to ask me.
Best regards,


-njjoe
 

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fluid exchanger

Has anyone tried using a fluid exchanger/pump to change their transmission fluid? I have one and it has a skinny attachment that would allow me to suck the old oil out through the dipstick. I've used it to change oil on other cars before. It works really well.

http://tinyurl.com/j8xd2

Extremely unmessy, easy to use, and it has measurements labelled on the side of it so you know right away how much new fluid to add back in.

Larez2

I read this exchange a while back and now my tranny seems to be slipping. So, I was going to cange the fluid this weekend. However, I was wondering about the fluid exchanger since I didn't really see any newer replies other than the lack of sludge.
 

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Re: fluid exchanger

jmaloneaz said:
I read this exchange a while back and now my tranny seems to be slipping.
jmaloneaz-

If your CVT is really "slipping", I doubt very much if a fluid change would rectify the problem.

There are only two places where the CVT could possible slip - 1) the single clutch, or 2) the belt-to-pulley contact patch. If either of those areas are slipping, then you are looking at a new unit.

How many miles are on your MO?

-njjoe
 

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Re: fluid exchanger

:Originally posted by jmaloneaz
I read this exchange a while back and now my tranny seems to be slipping.


jmaloneaz-

If your CVT is really "slipping", I doubt very much if a fluid change would rectify the problem.

There are only two places where the CVT could possible slip - 1) the single clutch, or 2) the belt-to-pulley contact patch. If either of those areas are slipping, then you are looking at a new unit.

How many miles are on your MO?

-njjoe
126,962 I just checked my records and the dealer changed it at 101,303. I don't really know if it is the tranny but yesterday in the mountains the car hesitated before starting and sometimes I would have to feather the pedal to continue at the same speed.
 

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You might try checking the hose to MAF connection.
Ours had some serious problems caused by that - they also recalibrated the throttle(?) I think.
 

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Gonzo said, "Perhaps the throttle position sensor." and Blue StwW8 said, "You might try checking the hose to MAF connection.
Ours had some serious problems caused by that - they also recalibrated the throttle(?) I think.."

How do I check either of those?

Thanks,:)
 

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Just completed CVT flush with Nippon's Eneos synthetic CVT fluid on my wife's 06' Murano at 33,000 miles. It took about 11.5 quarts. Total cost including oil, shipping, and a piece of rubber hose to make a drain line from the CVT oil cooler was about $140. We'll be making a 250 mile trip in two days. I'll let everyone know if the CVT falls out.

-Matt-
 

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mattg said:
Just completed CVT flush with Nippon's Eneos synthetic CVT fluid on my wife's 06' Murano at 33,000 miles. It took about 11.5 quarts. Total cost including oil, shipping, and a piece of rubber hose to make a drain line from the CVT oil cooler was about $140. We'll be making a 250 mile trip in two days. I'll let everyone know if the CVT falls out.

-Matt-
Welcome to the forum!

I have two questions for you...

1) Why did you elect to change the fluid at only 33,000 miles?

2) Why the Eneos fluid? That is not approved for use in the MO.

-njjoe
 

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Thanks Joe,

1) I intended to change the fluid at 30,000, but the flush requires two people so I waited until I came home for Thanksgiving. I decided on 30,000 because that's what the premium maintenance schedule in the 06' service and maintenance guide calls for. I know there has been a lot of debate on the drain interval for the CVT. There's not a lot of information or historical data readily available to convince me that a longer drain interval is okay, and a shorter drain interval can't hurt anything.

2) I decided on the Nippon Eneos for a few reasons.

-I think it's highly likely that Nissan NS-2 and Eneos are the exact same thing. I don't know of any auto manufacturer that oem's their own lubricant. Eneos is the only alternative I've found anywhere. If they aren't making it for Nissan then who is?

- Even if Nippon isn't manufacturing Nissan's CVT fluid and I think they are, I think Nippon's products are of high quality. I wasn't able to find any negative feedback on any of their products. They manufacture a broad range of products from automotive to industrial lubricants. As of 06' they've had 1.6 trillion dollars invested in their company. I think they have the capital to bring a quality product to market.

-It is not approved by Nissan, but that does not mean that Nissan can void your warranty for using it. If my CVT were to fail while using ENEOS, Nissan has to prove that the failure was caused by the fluid. Here's the line from the 06' manual:

"Using transmission fluid other than Genuine Nissan CVT Fluid NS-2 will damage the CVT transmission, which is not covered by the Nissan New Vehicle Limited Warranty"

Here's the line from Nippon's website:

"ENEOS products are all API and SAE approved with the latest certifications. Using the correct application of ENEOS product will not void your vehicle's factory warranty."

-If the CVT were to fail as a result of the Eneos fluid then Nippon would be responsible for the failure since they state that their fluid is compatible with the Extronic CVT

-With 33,000 miles on the odometer, I only have 3,000 miles left on the warranty. After 36,000 Nissan wont be paying for a CVT failure anyway.

-Eneos is $10/quart. For less than the price of a drain and refill with Nissan NS-2, I can do a full flush with Eneos.


I took a few pictures of the flush process, but since I'm a forum newbie, wasn't sure on the correct way to post them. As an attachment, or some other way? If anybody is interested in seeing them, point me to a thread that explains how to do it, or message me and tell me how.

-Matt-
 

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Matt

you can only attach one picture at a time. It cannot exceed 102kB.

I ususally resize the photos to 800 x 600 pixels (or something smilar), place them in a separate folder on my HD. Then when you want to attach a photo, down below the text box you will see "attachement" link. Point the link to the photo you want to upload and you should be fine.
 

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mattg said:
-With 33,000 miles on the odometer, I only have 3,000 miles left on the warranty. After 36,000 Nissan wont be paying for a CVT failure anyway.
Matt-

I have good news for you.

The CVT is covered under the powertrain warranty, which is good for 5 years or 60,000 miles, not the 36,000 you implied. You have another 27,000 miles left on the clock. :4:

-njjoe
 

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That is good news. I couldn't find that info in the warranty booklet, or in the owner's manual. I was going off what the salesman told me when he was trying to sell the extended warranty. Should have known better.

-Matt-
 

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Matt,

I would like to see the pictures and any other info you have on the process. By the sounds of it you did the full flush and that is what I would like to do. I have 92,000 miles on mine and at 105,000 I am planning on replacing the plugs and front shocks and would like to take care of this around the same time while I have it laid up.
 

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Kris, Thanks for the photo info.

Folgersoldier,

I did do the full flush. Here's the .pdf I found floating around on the net. It's based on the 03' but everything was the same on the 06'
 

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Flush Details

I varied a bit from the instructions on the .pdf that I posted in the last post. I made the assumption that once fluid was pumped from the CVT oil pan, it did not return to the pan until after it traveled through the CVT , torque converter, and finally the CVT oil cooler which is the drain point for the flush. The instructions in the .pdf call for you to pour new fluid in the dipstick as the engine is running and pumping the fluid out at the CVT oil cooler return line. It seemed to me that this would instantly mix the new fluid with the old fluid in the CVT oil pan. I decided to do a drain and refill first, and then follow the rest of the directions on the .pdf. This meant I would start the flush with completely new oil in the CVT oil pan instead of pouring new fluid into old fluid. My logic may be flawed here, but this worked very well for me.

As far as the drain refill portion, I followed the directions that Eric posted in the first post of this thread (steps 1 to 15 only, DO NOT start the car after you refill). The are very detailed and accurate. I wont go through the trouble of re-posting those steps, I will only point out anything that I noticed different on the 06'. I will note those differences using his original step numbers:

3) I used ramps which puts the car on a slight incline. This directs the fluid in the pan toward the drain hole. Personal preference.

7) The drain plug on the 06' is removed with a large allen wrench not a 19mm socket.

10) I did the same thing here, but will add one step for accuracy when I do it again. I would take a measuring cup (my wife loves when I use here kitchen measuring cups in the garage) and fill the 1 gallon jugs up with water, marking the side with a permanent marker at 1 quart intervals. If you want to be really accurate go with .5 quart intervals. This will help you to estimate the exact amount of fluid drained/needed. This is more beneficial when doing the flush as you are draining fluid with the car running, and need to know exactly how much is coming out. Not a lot of room for guesswork.

11) Didn't see a copper gasket. Looks like they changed drain plugs as mine used the allen wrench. Must have done away with it when they made the change.

Flush steps:

Extra stuff you'll need:

- a 14 inch piece of 1/4 inch rubber fuel tubing or something similar to complete the flush.
- a friend to start and stop the engine for you.

1) Remove the plastic skid guard that covers the bottom of the radiator. Mine had 11 of those really annoying plastic snaps, and 2 phillips head screws holding it on. Use a small screw driver to pry the center of the snaps back, then they should pull out.
2) The CVT oil cooler is located in the bottom of the radiator. The fluid flows into it from the hose on the passenger side and out through the hose on the driver's side. It took me a while to find this. I suspected it would be in front of the radiator as a separate unit. Wrong. It's built into the bottom of the radiator, not a separate unit. This location is much easier.
3) Place your large container under the hose on the driver's side of the CVT oil cooler.
4) Use a pair of pliers to slide the hose clamp back up the hose on the outlet (driver's side) of the CVT oil cooler.
5) Remove the hose from the oil cooler. Some fluid will drain from the oil cooler and the hose into the large container. Leave the hose hanging.
6) Remove the hose clamp and set it aside.
7) Attach the 14 inch piece of 1/4 inch fuel tubing the outlet of the CVT oil cooler where you just removed the CVT hose from.
8) Slide the hose clamp up the fuel tubing and over the connection point on the CVT oil cooler. This will be the drain hose.
9) Place the end of the drain hose in one of the gallon jugs that you marked previously.
10) Have a friend start the car.
11) Let 1 quart drain and then stop the engine. (The directions in the .pdf don't call for stopping the engine, but the fluid drains faster than you can pour it in)
12) Pour one quart of new fluid back in through the CVT dipstick.
13) Repeat steps 10 through 12 approx. 6 times. I pumped about 6 quarts out. These 6 quarts plus the approx. 5.5 quarts from the drain refill left me with .5 quart to tweak the fluid level once everything was put back together. (After approx. 3 quarts have been pumped out, you will start to see clean fluid)
14) You're now done with the draining portion. Remove the hose clamp from the fuel tubing on the outlet port of the CVT oil cooler.
15) Remove the fuel tubing from the CVT oil cooler. (put it in a Ziploc bag and keep it in the garage for next time)
16) Slide the hose clamp on the CVT oil hose you left hanging in step 5.
17) Secure the hose back on the outlet port on the CVT oil cooler.
18) Secure the hose clamp back on the connection.
19) Clean up any fluid that may be on any of the hoses, oil cooler, etc.
20) Lower the car off jack stands or ramps, whatever you choose.
21) Start the engine, and shift through all of the gears (that don't exist in a cvt), and back to park. Leave the engine running.
22) Check the CVT fluid level and see that it is registering on the dipstick. If it's not, add some fluid until it is.
23) Drive the car for approx. 15 minutes to bring the CVT up to operating temperature.
24) Shift through all the gears again and back to park. Leave the car running.
25) Check the fluid level again, and add fluid as needed to bring it to the correct level.
26) Turn the engine off.
27) Raise the front of the car, and check for any leaks at the CVT oil pan drain plug as well as the outlet port on the CVT oil cooler.
28) Attach the plastic skid guard.
29) Lower the car, and you're done!

This took a total of 11.5 of the 12 quarts I purchased. You may want to purchase 1 or 2 quarts extra to allow for any calculation error.

I've attached a picture of the drain setup.

-Matt-
 

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CVT Fluid Appearance from Dip Stick

Pat03MO said:
Just did a CVT fluid drain and fill on my 2003 MO. Took just shy of 6 quarts. At 53,000 miles, the fluid in my 1 gallon containers looked like dirty motor oil. Made me cringe... For $135 bucks, it's still cheaper than a new $6000 CVT. Afterwards, CVT dipstick looked much clearer. The dealer here says change it every 60,000 miles. I see why...
I took a look my CVT dip stick this morning (2004 model, 58K miles), and the color is just a little bit more yellow than fresh new engine oil. If the fluid in the CVT pan is same as what is on the dip stick, I don't feel the need to change it. But I remember reading somewhere here that CVT fluid in the pan may be actually dirtier than what it looks from tip of the dip stick end.

Does anybody know how much a difference in appearance between your dip stick and the the fluid inside the pan?

Thanks.
 

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Eric L. said:
...3) Optional - jack up the car and place on jackstands, all four corners (remember the car needs to be level for a proper drain)
...
Why can't I just jackup the front end, and put two jackstands on both left and right side? Wouldn't that provide a even better drain given the drain plug is located to the rear end of the CVT fulid pan?

I also read in a safety related posting on this forum that lifting the car level up with 4 jack stands somehow are considered not safe. I asked why and are waiting somebody to respond.

Has anybody did the CVT fluid change by jackstanding only the front of the car, or even just climb underneath without any lifting at all?
 

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Re: Re: DIY - Change your CVT Fluid

The bottom of the CVT pan is flat. So if the car is not level, there will still be some fluid left in the pan. The CVT drain plug faces the ground directly, unlike the engine oil drain plug which is facing towards the rear of the vehicle (so tilting the front up would help it to drain).

And of course you can drain the fluid without jacking up the car at all, if you can reach the drain plug (it isn't too hard). I jack up all four corners since I also do a tire rotation when waiting for the CVT fluid to drain out.

I don't have any issues with putting the car on four jackstands. Just make sure you select a proper jackstand point to support the vehicle.

BlueHorse said:


Why can't I just jackup the front end, and put two jackstands on both left and right side? Wouldn't that provide a even better drain given the drain plug is located to the rear end of the CVT fulid pan?

I also read in a safety related posting on this forum that lifting the car level up with 4 jack stands somehow are considered not safe. I asked why and are waiting somebody to respond.

Has anybody did the CVT fluid change by jackstanding only the front of the car, or even just climb underneath without any lifting at all?
 
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