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DIY - Increasing / Improving the output of the Bose Murano Subwoofer

I bought a '10 LE Murano for my wife in early December of last year. I was very pleased with the purchase, but I was surprised by the minimal amount of bass that the Bose 7.1 system produced. At first I thought I had a defective unit; but when I went to my dealer, he opened up another '10 LE and the sub sounded exactly the same. The bass just didn't want to hit, there was very little punch.

To preface things, I know very, very little about car audio. I do know a good deal about electronics, and I had my oscilloscope, my multimeter, and my engineering degree to fall back on so I couldn't screw things up that bad. Let me just say, at the conclusion of this DIY, I had to turn the bass down to keep the drinks from shaking, so it works.

The goal of this project was to use the OEM sub and be able to return the sub back to its stock form without anyone noticing. That is why all the wiring changes have been done inside the subwoofer.

Parts
- External Amplifier (preferrably one with a gain setting)
- 20' of wire for the Amp Power supply
NOTE: I used 12 gauge wire since my sub really isn't going to be drawing a whole lot of current. Read the minimum requirements specified in your Amp manual.
- ~10-15' length of wire for extensions and the ground (different colors help!)
- Terminal connectors
NOTE: Please don't cheap out and just wrap bare wire around the battery bolts and ground bolts. It looks ugly and you will regret it later when it comes loose and shorts out.

Tools
- Soldering Iron / Solder
- Phillips / Blade screwdriver
- Wire stripper
- Wire cutter
- Electrical Tape
- 10mm socket / ratchet

1) Start by opening the trunk. Remove the carpet cover, lift up the access panel, and remove any storage trays or flat boards you encounter. I used a piece of wood placed against the access panel and the spare tire to hold the access panel open so I could work.

2) You should be able to see the subwoofer. Remove the retaining bracket (red arrow) by pulling straight out on it. It may take some force, but eventually it will come out. Then, remove the OEM connector from the subwoofer by pushing down on the tab (blue arrow) and pulling straight out.



3) Unscrew the large, plastic star shaped piece (red arrow) by turning it counter clockwise. Eventually, it will pull straight out.



4) Remove the subwoofer from the trunk and set it on your work table. Notice the small screws (10) on the cover. Remove these with a phillips or blade screwdriver.



5) Lift the cover away. You should see the internals of the subwoofer.



6) Notice the cast aluminum rectangle with the "Bose" stamped on it. This is the tiny, tiny internal amplifier used by Bose to power this subwoofer. Remove the four screws around the amp.



7) Gently pry up both sides of the amp with a blade screwdriver. It should be able to be removed from the subwoofer.



8) Turn the amp over, and notice the small tab on the connector (red arrow). Press this tab, and then pull on the connector to remove it from the amp.



9) Remove the insulation covering the wires. You will need about 2" to make your connections. This stuff is sticky, so rub it or peel it off the wires.



10) Cut the green and red wires (both sets) half-way between the connector and where the insulation ends. These are the wires that go to the 2 speakers in the subwoofer. Remember, one set of wires goes to one speaker, and the other set goes to the other speaker, so make sure you keep them seperated. Once cut, remove a bit of insulation from the end of each of the four wires.



11) Now, you will need to figure out how to connect the speakers. The speakers inside the Bose Subwoofer are 2 Ohm speakers. Using the instructions from your aftermarket subwoofer as a guide, you need to check the Ohm requirements for the amp.

Some things to note:
- The wires you will be tapping into from the headunit are High Level connections (~6 volts)
- The signal going to these wires is *already* filtered for Low Band Pass. This means that only those low bass hits are going to played by the subwoofer.
- The speakers inside the Bose Subwoofer are TWO OHM SPEAKERS!!!

My Sony Xplod Amp required a minimum of 4 Ohm speakers, as you can see in the picture below:



12) Therefore, in order to make the Bose Sub work with my Sony Amplifier, I had to connect both of the speakers together in series. Since resistances add in series, I had a total of 4 Ohms in my Subwoofer. I then soldered extension wires to the speaker package and wrapped the solder joints in electrical tape.



13) Now to the other wires on the connector.
- Blue wire: the "Turn On" signal that comes from the head unit. This tells the amplifier to turn on when the radio is on.
- Brown Wire: +12 Volts to the internal amplifier
- Black wire: Ground to the internal amplifier
- Red wire: + signal input to the internal amplifier
- Yellow wire: - signal input to the internal amplifier
- Pink wire: not used in my vehicle



14) Cut all the wires going to the connector. This may seem like a point of no return, but the wires are all color coded so it will not be difficult to reconnect the wires when you are going back to stock.



15) Solder extension wires for the blue "Turn on" wire, and for the + and - signal input wires. Make sure you remember which wire is which. In my case the + signal wire is the black extension wire, and the - signal wire is the brown extension wire. Once soldered, wrap electrical tape around the solder joints to prevent shorting. Also, cover the ends of the three unused wires with electrical tape.



16) Route the original cable and the 5 new wires around the path that is laid out for them. If you have it, a little cable wrap will keep the wires together.



17) Install the connector back into the Bose amplifier. Then, reinstall the amplifier into the subwoofer using the 4 phillips head screws.

18) Reinstall the cover on the subwoofer using the 10 phillips head screws.

NOTE: Do NOT hook the wire to the battery UNTIL you are directed to do so. Otherwise, you may short out the wire and blow some fuses in the car.
19) Now we need to get some power to the amp. Starting from the engine bay, open up the hood and look for the firewall grommet. The next three pictures will show you where it is.





 

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Discussion Starter #2
20) Tape the end of your 20' long power wire to a long, thin phillips screwdriver. The goal is to poke the screwdriver through the grommet, and with it will come the wire. Be careful not to poke any of the wires in the harness! Go to the other side of the grommet, and look for the screwdriver / wire to come through. Seperate the two, and then pull the wire through.



21) Route the wire along the driver's side trim, and into the trunk. Leave it hanging inside the trunk for now.

22) Bring the sub back, and put it into the trunk. Using the instruction manual for the external amplifier, install the 5 extension wires you pulled from the sub into the amplifier. Make sure you fuse the power wire coming from the battery. The picture below is a "test install", so you can see some bare wires and no terminal connectors.



23) You will need to install a ground for the amp, as close to the amp as possible. Any of the bolts in the trunk will do; I used one near the back so I could bundle the power and ground wires in the same wire casing.

24) Finally, connect the Amp power wire to the battery.

24) Plug the connector into the Subwoofer, and test the amp at the lowest settings to make sure it works. Once you have tested/adjusted the amp, mount it in a convienent spot. I found that if I remove the storage container below the access panel (which my wife doesn't know about) then my amp fit perfectly.

Access Hatch Open:





Access Hatch Closed:



25) Don't forget to reinstall the star shaped retaining bolt you removed in step 3.

That's it! Please let me know if you have any questions I can help with.
 

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Nice, I wish I was good with these things, seems simple enough, well I guess I could pay Best Buy to do just the amp connection, would not break the bank. So in sum you're saying that the sub itself is not "bad", it just needs better amplification? Now, on my setting I have a good 4 more bars 'til MAX so I personally have no complaints but hey, more BASS, more fun! Good job! I hope they make this a sticky, seems easy enough (except for me of course):2:
 

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Awesome writeup! Very thorough and I'm sure this will be a great help to many! I see you put in a 600 Watt amp. What is the wattage of the original Bose amp? Are you afraid you're going to overload the little speakers since it seemed to be designed for a baby amp? What is your current gain setting on the Sony amp, and what is your Head Unit "Bass" setting?

Thanks!

Patrick
 

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Phatty McPatty said:
Awesome writeup! Very thorough and I'm sure this will be a great help to many! I see you put in a 600 Watt amp. What is the wattage of the original Bose amp? Are you afraid you're going to overload the little speakers since it seemed to be designed for a baby amp? What is your current gain setting on the Sony amp, and what is your Head Unit "Bass" setting?


I don't know the wattage of the OEM amp, but I would guess less then 50 watts. It's truly tiny. I turned all the gains all the way down on the amp, and set the head unit to the middle position for Bass. After it powered up, it had a little more hit already, but I wanted a touch more for daily listening, so I turned up the gain about 1/4 of a turn.

When I set the bass on the head unit all the way to the right, it really hits hard but not so much that the sub reaches distortion. Remember, it's not using all 600 watts to drive the sub but I would not go any bigger then 600.

Mike
 

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1) Nice job!

2) Doesn't the LE come a pop-up divided cargo tray or did they delete that in 2010?

3) You're the latest member of the "I-Forgot-To-Take-The-Blue-Tape-Off-My-Rear-Scuff-Pads" Club.

4) Take care!

5) Jim
 

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@ faelingl

The write-up is excellent...You really nailed this one and from the pictures and explanations, it looks so simple. This definitely needs to be stickied as it'll inspire lots of members needed to have that extra bit of bass boost!

@ red kiosk

For 2010, Nissan deleted the pop up cargo divider on the LE model. Sometimes I just want to smack whomever's in charge @ Nissan and then ask them what were they thinking....I tell you, some of the changes they make just doesn't make sense. Just like the stop light on the 2nd Gen, I'll never understand that move has it was one of the characteristics of the 1st Gen and you couldn't mistake it for anything else...anyways I'm done venting :D
 

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I guess they have to make enough changes to warrant calling it a new MO. :) Otherwise, people will think they're still buying a first gen.

I'm looking into this guys modifications for my MO. Getting a lower powered amp to boost bass should be interesting.
 

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I guess it would be bridged mode....I'm not really 100% sure what that means. I just looked at the wiring diagrams on the sub instructions and followed them.

600W is *plenty*, if not overkill. It's turned up to about 1/4 of the way right now.

Mike
 

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So did N E body actually did this yet, I dont want to dougbt the writer, but plz let us know if its a big enough gain for this mod.

Thank You
 

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I didn't do it, especially since this is specific to the 2nd Gen system with 2 subs. My only suggestion would be to use a smaller amp. A 200-watt would probably be sufficient since Faelingl mentioned he's got the 600-watt amp cranked way down.

Patrick
 

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Great write up, very organized and meticulously presented...and beyond my capabilities.... but you have to be able to retro that so it doesn't show evidence of tampering if your car's under warranty.... otherwise they'll deny and void your warranty. The problem with the warranties is that they can and will deny anything hooked up to your sound system saying that the modification was the cause of the other failure, no matter how remote it may seem.....been there, done that. I've seen warranties denied because a guy put on an aftermarked Cool Air Intake....c'mon...all it does is let more air in...they claimed that the bigger mesh allowed or could allow water or other foreign objects to enter the intake...huh?
 

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Great write up, very organized and meticulously presented...and beyond my capabilities.... but you have to be able to retro that so it doesn't show evidence of tampering if your car's under warranty.... otherwise they'll deny and void your warranty. The problem with the warranties is that they can and will deny anything hooked up to your sound system saying that the modification was the cause of the other failure, no matter how remote it may seem.....been there, done that. I've seen warranties denied because a guy put on an aftermarked Cool Air Intake....c'mon...all it does is let more air in...they claimed that the bigger mesh allowed or could allow water or other foreign objects to enter the intake...huh?
I'm not quite certain about this as I has a remote start installed on my Murano. At the signing they made it sound as though the dealer was doing the work but afterwards I came to find out it was a cheapo audiovox remote start that was installed off site. I couldnt see how a simple amp/wiring would void a warranty especially since these wires are only for the sub. Now maybe if the sub blows out and you want it replaced... The remote start hacked into way more wires than this write up.

But you never know. Thats why I hate dealerships
 

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It really only becomes an issue if something goes amiss with the audio system and you try to get the dealership to address it. If they can see any evidence of alterations, you "might" be in for an argument depending upon your relationship with the service manager.....I've seen and experienced first hand what happens when a dealership points to an aftermarket part and tries to make a claim that because of the "unauthorized replacement or modification" of a particular part, the warranty is void. My example of the cool air intake actually happened and is actually part of the car manufacturer's write up in the car warranty language. You have to look at the language in your car warranty...buried in the fine print. I haven't looked at the Nissan documentation so I dont' know what their disclaimers are. As I said, it's not an issue until something goes amiss, then the dance begins. That's why I don't intend to do any aftermarket mods to this car. I already had an issue with the rear facing DVD players in the headrests. They stopped working and I took it in to the dealership where I bought the dogone thing. The first thing the service manager did was disclaim any responsibility because it was an aftermarket part (this is Nissan service ). I told him that it was a Nissan install and a Nissan part. He disagreed and said Nissan didn't have those in inventory. He left and came back 10 minutes later and told me that he had run the serial number and model and that it was in fact a Nissan install for a loaded LE as recorded in the history of the vehicle....so they agreed to go in and found the power problem and fixed it....but not without my insistence that it wasn't an aftermarket product.
 

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Again off topic but that stinks. So basically my car could have an ignition failure and I would be royally screwed because of the aftermarket remote start that I bought at the time of purchase (brand new purchase). Yuck! Hopefully this will never get to there :)

Its like a game of roulette with the warranty!
 

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Good writeup, couple suggestions to make it a cleaner job that can be reversed.

1. Why destroy the OEM amp connector by snipping the wires? Pull the pins out of the connector housing and solder a second wire to each line, then push the pins back in to the housing.
2. Instead of using black electrically tape, use heat shrink for a more pro look that doesn't goo up and unwind over the summer heat like electrical tape.

Also, if the solution only requires boosting the power of the amp then it might be a better idea to replace mod the OEM amp with higher outputs to gain another 25w or so. I might make this a winter project....lol.
 

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Awesome writeup! Very thorough and I'm sure this will be a great help to many! I see you put in a 600 Watt amp. What is the wattage of the original Bose amp? Are you afraid you're going to overload the little speakers since it seemed to be designed for car navigation system a baby amp? What is your current gain setting on the Sony amp, and what is your Head Unit "Bass" setting?

Thanks!


Patrick
Hello it is an old thread but I would like to say it has been written in perfect manner. It is a great help for as I was looking to increase output of my woofers
 

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Just so you know. In step one, you can use the hanger hook to hold up the spare tire lid. It's located on the right hand side of the under side of the lid. You can see it on the top right corner on the second last picture of post#2.
 
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