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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone done their own brakes yet? Picked up some imported performance pads from Japan. Low dust, work well, say Nissan on them.:D

I'll be putting them in tomorrow. Already checked out the discs and they're looking fine and still in spec.
 

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Would be great if you could post pictures. I try to do most maintenance myself but I never touched the brakes but I understanding replacing pads is pretty easy. I just need someone to show me initially.
 

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Same here. I would love to have an example.

Congrats, Jaak! You get to be our guinnea pig! :D
 

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If its like most Nissans, all you will need to do is undo one brake bolt, rotate the caliper up, and replace the pads. You will need a disc brake caliper compression tool though. If you do not have one, you can buy one for $10, or rent the entire kit from your local Autozone for a refundable deposit.

Make sure to get a tube of CRC Disc Brake quiet. Its a red goo you place on the back of the pads.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I've done the brakes on almost all my vehicles and yes, it's straight forward and easy. The most important things are ensuring your vehicle is safe, by blocking the wheels, using jackstands and proper capacity jack.

Disk Brake Caliper compression tool? Yeah, that's a big mother C clamp!

Oh, and never step on the pedal when a caliper is off, or you'll push the pistons out. I've never done it, but I did see a buddy do it about 30 years back, after I told him not to.

You also need to inspect things, to make sure all is well. Nothing's seized, or damaged. I don't expect to have problems on a 2.5 year old vehicle.

You also need the right tools, including a torque wrench. Both for the caliber and the wheels. Nissans are notorious for developing warped rotors if you over torque the wheels.

Yeah, pictures would be good, wouldn't they....

Hey Eric, thanks for reminding me about the goo. I'll have to check my tool box to see if I still have some.

The Nissan pads come with.... Boxes. I know some aftermarket pads give you their own goo.
 

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yes, I have always used a C-clamp and the old pad to press the piston back in...make sure you do it veeeeery slowly and the fluid tank isn't too full, the single biggest mistake I have seen folks make is to top off the brake fluid only to change their brake pads a few weeks later...then the fluid goes everywhere when they press the pistons back in.
 

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You might also want to check whether the rear brake calipers on the Murano require a twisting motion to retract the calipers. If so, you might need more than a C-clamp (a pair of pliers usually did the trick though).
 

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The only thing I would add to this discussion is to remember that these are ABS brakes.
I get the impression that several folks just compress the pistons and go like the olden times.
This is absolutely the worst thing you can do with an ABS setup.
Just compressing will force the old fluid out of the Caliper and back into the system.
This can damage the ABS valve which is not set up to pass fluid in that direction.

So, the BEST thing to do is to drain the fluid from each caliper.
This does several things for you.
It saves the ABS valve from possible damage.
It makes it easy to "compress" the Pistons.
What the heck, you were going to go with new DOT5* anyway, right? Right? I mean you WERE going to throw that old crap out anyway, right?:2:

Just no reason to do it "the old way".


Homer

*Dot5 - I don't know what type of Fluid the Murano uses. But older types (Dot 3/4) are Hydro....sumthin (attracts water - they are Glycol. Dot5 doesn't attract water. It is Silicone. Doesn't "compress" like the earlier stuff. Gives a much better pedal IMO. However there are some who argue for DOT3 or DOT4. Fine. Use the 3 or 4. But change it regularly.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Done.

Easy, simple, works like it always has (yes the old way) as I could push the piston in with my hand if I realy squeezed, but the c clamp was easy. The manual tells you to do it that way, and there's no concern about damage to ABS mentioned.

Used the manuals instructions for jacking and jackstand locations, two bolts on each caliper, and you can take it off, pulled the outside pad, cleaned the shim and backing plate, greased it as instructed, used the c clamp on the old pad to push the piston back in, pulled out that pad, etc.

The only thing you have to watch is putting the front pads in, as you need to push the springs out of the way to put the pads back in place.

Torqued it all together, adusted the parking brake while I had it apart and it all works well. The original pads were about 65% gone all around, so it was time.

Total time 2 hours. I was going to take pictures, but there 3 reasons I didn't. 1) It was so easy, what for? The service manual gives you all you need and if you've ever done brakes before, you could do these in your sleep. 2) It would have taken longer. 3) Didn't want to get the camera dirty with my messy hands.

Did the burnishing procedure as outlined in the manual and all is happy and new.

Easy for anyone that way inclined, with the right tools.:D

Oh and while I was there, I saw my sparkling new transfer case, complete with no leaks.
 

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Are the new pads different, I mean not OEM, originally installed.

Where did you get them? how much$$

PS. great job! I am approaching 40K so it is probably time to look at the pads.
 

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I am not aware of any special routine for working on brakes whether they are ABS or not. Well for Nissans, anyways - like jaak says, the service manual gives a standard procedure identical to my non ABS Maxima (as well).

It might be sound advice for other vehicles though. I do agree its not a bad idea to flush the brake fluid (or at least bleed it) when you do the pads. I plan to flush my brakes out with the ATE Blue brake fluid whenever I get to them.
 

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As an example......from Bendix..........

"http://www.ryderfleetproducts.com/cgi-bin/ryderfp/technicalbulletins/brakeabsprob.jsp"

Tech Tips > ABS Brake System - Common Problem Prevention
Avoid Problems Becoming Routine During ABS Brake Service

Antilock braking systems have had more of an impact on brake servicing than may seem obvious. And although most jobs are routine and your customer leaves satisfied, on occasion somebody will come back in to your shop with a complaint. The most successful installers have mastered the art of quick - but complete - installations. Most comebacks aren't the result of something intentionally done wrong, but may be caused by something overlooked.

According to the The Bendix Answerman team, they get the following call at least once a day: "I just did a routine front brake realignment and now the vehicle's:

ABS light is on.
Brake pedal is low.
Brakes are dragging.
ABS system self applies at low speeds.
Pulling to the left/right."
Most, if not all of these problems can be avoided by adopting some simple and very effective practices when performing brake service on an ABS equipped vehicle.

The number one cause of four of the problems listed above is very simple; and to prevent it from happening, technicians need to modify the way they are currently doing a brake job. It is extremely important to open the bleeder screw when compressing caliper pistons or wheel cylinders during routine brake maintenance.

When a caliper piston is pushed in, brake fluid gets forced backward, up into the system. Since the caliper is the lowest point in the system, dirt and corrosion naturally accumulate there. When this grime and dirt finds its way into the HCU portion of the ABS system, it can cause valves to stick, which leads to a vehicle pulling one way or another; accumulators to stick open, which leads to low pedal; compensator ports to plug which leads to dragging brakes; and of course, it can make the ABS light come on leading to all of the above.

If installers get in the habit of opening the bleeder when they compress the caliper piston, as well as selling customers a brake fluid flush, these problems will more than likely not occur.

The fifth problem installers seemed concerned with is when the ABS applies itself at low speed. Wheel speed sensors are magnetic. They can collect large amounts of debris from the road. Freshly turned rotors can also leave metal filings on the sensors, especially if an on-car brake lathe is used. Some OEM's actually recommend removing the sensors during rotor machining. The Bendix Answerman team recommends that installers get in the habit of cleaning the wheel speed sensors and tone rings during a brake job. This can help prevent false signals that can actuate the ABS system during low speed stops.

Brake technology, like everything else on a vehicle, is changing constantly. By keeping up on changes like these, you're likely to avoid unwanted comebacks.

This documentation was provided by Jay M Buckley Bendix Answerman, Bendix Brakes.
 

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Homer,

fantastic info! Thanks
 

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After you've changed pads or just flushing old brake fluid and you are alone, to bleed the brakes; place driver's seat in far back position; cut a wooden stick and place on brake pedal and front of seat; open "bleed valve"; move power seat forward until brake pedal fully depressed; close bleed valve; repeat as often as necessary.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I didn't flush the system, as I'm still very satisfied with the condition of the brake fluid. As far as contamination goes, I did inspect the piston boots visually, without removal, and due to the construction of the calipers, I was not concerned about contamination as the boot would have to show signs of damage before contamination could enter the system at that point.

Since the system is only exposed to the environment when I do a fluid level check, and I'm very clean about that, I'm not worried about the system. The brakes are very solid, no sponginess.

I believe in checking things to ensure they're working correctly and not disturbing them if all is fine. This includes messing around with the bleeders, which also could lead to contamination if one little slip up occurs. It's nice to put a check valve on the exit line, if bleeding the brakes, to ensure fluid can not travel back in to the caliper, when doing this.

Oh, the pistons returned without issue, if the pressure varied in any way, when compressing them, I would have taken it apart to diagnose the problem.

I didn't fix anything that wasn't broken. But all interesting reading.
 

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senza said:
After you've changed pads or just flushing old brake fluid and you are alone, to bleed the brakes; place driver's seat in far back position; cut a wooden stick and place on brake pedal and front of seat; open "bleed valve"; move power seat forward until brake pedal fully depressed; close bleed valve; repeat as often as necessary.

There are a variety of devices for one person brake bleeding. You could get spring loaded bleeder valves, a mityvac vacuum pump, or my favorite, a Motive Power Bleeder. Do a google on it, its a cool product.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Kris, OEM brake pads, just like OEM tires when I did them.

Sure, if you spend enough time and money, you might find something better. Or you might spend money and find something worse.

In checking out aftermarket pads, the indications of a recommended high performance pad had the properties as the OEM pads. (In my short look)

I'm very satisfied with their performance. The new ones do stop a bit better than the old ones. But this may change has they seat.
 

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Kris said:
Anybody out there tried these pads:

Murano performance pads

EBC makes a line of brake pads for SUVs as well. I think the EBC6000 and EBC7000 series might be more suitable for the Murano, and they cost only a little more. I've seen the 7000 series pads for around $100.
 
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