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Discussion Starter #1

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My oh my, no wonder they are gas-guzzlers with that weight,

"The group slipped past security at the Land Rover factory in Solihull near Birmingham at around 7 a.m. and chained themselves to an assembly line producing the 45,000 pound Range Rover model." :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
That's funny...

To me it just the stupidity of Greenpeace in some of their actions. The principle is right I think, but don't single out one particular type of car, there's lots of family saloons which generate more pollution, the big diesel trains going up and down the country generate per passenger more pollution compared to cars...And take a look at the UK buses, looks like no MOT (Roadworthyness and emissions tests) are applicable...
 

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That's got to be a typo, "45,000 lb Range Rover Model"!

I could see 4,500 lb vehicles, easily.

Arent the biggest passenger vehicles out on the road about 6,000lbs?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
dklanecky1 said:
That's got to be a typo, "45,000 lb Range Rover Model"!

I could see 4,500 lb vehicles, easily.

Arent the biggest passenger vehicles out on the road about 6,000lbs?
It's getting even funnier :D

It does not say 45,000 lb, it says 45,000 pound. That is a big difference. Former is a unit of weight, the latter is a unit of currency although it is pronounced the same as lb...Pound for Great Britain Pound Sterling, or...approximately USD 80,000
 

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In defense Mr. dklanecky1 et al, on this side of the pond, the sentence could still be read as a weight, although the word should probably be hyphenated.

As in, "The 45,000-pound reality show star tried her best to fit into the 4,500-pound Range Rover, but to no avail." (By the way, in this country, use of the word "stone" is typically followed by a "d" or "r" in this context.) ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
LOL And here is a Dutch guy pointing out the differences between UK and US English ;-)

If it was in context of weight, shouldn't even in US English have been used in its plural form? I.e. pounds for weight, and pound for currency...

Anyway it doesn't matter...The point was the ridiculous behaviour of Greenpeace....
 

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If it was in context of weight, shouldn't even in US English have been used in its plural form? I.e. pounds for weight, and pound for currency...
Not when it's an adjective. As in, "Pound for pound, a fifteen-foot, 4,500-pound Range Rover getting 3 miles per gallon may not be a great investment after all."
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the English lesson :)

My last defense then is that it is a factory in the UK, the news article produced by the London office of Reuters, and hosted on a UK website ;)

For the record, it was not my intention to have fun at the expense of another forum member. I read the first remark on the 45,000 pound as a funny twist-of-words which was then being taken seriously by the next poster....Quite funny I thought...
 

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English Grammar

Interest only, I have an English Language Teacher thats works in my dept.

The word ‘pound’ is a quantitative noun: (A comprehensive Grammar of the English Language, R, Quirk,et al, 1991, Longman, (pg:309) quote:

“….pound denoting currency may have a zero or regular plural….”

Same source (pg: 1613): “The hyphen marks the division within a word for two main purposes………. Secondly, ….is sometimes used to mark the parts of a word: to separate the bases of a compound or to separate the prefix of the word from its base. The rules for the use of the hyphen are subject to considerable variation…………..American English inclines to have fewer hyphens than British English.

The hyphen is used both in compounds and after prefix to avoid misinterpretation.” end quote.

Hyphenating, “45000 pound” would not have avoided any misinterpretation. Moreover, there is no need to separate the bases of the compound nor does the word pound have to be a plural.

Apart for the academic look at English, I believe that undertaking stunts like this, Greenpeace actually detracts from the good work that it has done in the past.

And why Land Rover, look at the nuclear waste issues, the fact that some major industrialised countries have yet to sign up to the 'Kyoto Protocol' and more etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Re: English Grammar

Phil-KSA said:
Apart for the academic look at English, I believe that undertaking stunts like this, Greenpeace actually detracts from the good work that it has done in the past.

And why Land Rover, look at the nuclear waste issues, the fact that some major industrialised countries have yet to sign up to the 'Kyoto Protocol' and more etc.
Couldn't agree more, spot on!

I actually heard some radio interviews on BBC West Midlands, local station covering local issues, they were really tough on Greenpeace considering the Job security in the Midlands. None of the protestors were local, they all lived in the London area's. For those not in the know, that area has lost thousands of jobs in the last few weeks, months, years; especially in the automotive industry with the downfall of MG-Rover, so they weren't happy to be singled out.
 

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dejongj said:
Thanks for the English lesson :)

My last defense then is that it is a factory in the UK, the news article produced by the London office of Reuters, and hosted on a UK website ;)

For the record, it was not my intention to have fun at the expense of another forum member. I read the first remark on the 45,000 pound as a funny twist-of-words which was then being taken seriously by the next poster....Quite funny I thought...
Sorry to take so long to respond, been out of commission with a cold. :(

I didn't think you were trying to make fun of anyone, and I agree the U.K. website could have been a tip-off. Just wanted to make clear that it COULD accurately be read as a weight rather than price, however unlikely that weight may be! :D

Phil-KSA, some good quotes, but I'm not clear what you're trying to say. "45,000 pound Land Rover" is technically correct as a weight or a price. I don't know of "45,000 pounds Land Rover" being proper in either context. The hyphenated "45,000-pound" is preferable, but use of hyphens is becoming less common in modern English.

Hmmm, maybe it should really be "forty-five thousand pound" since they're spelling out the word "pound". What do you think? ;)
 

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English Grammar

In answer to your question:

The UK is now metric, therefore it would have been quoted in Kg’s if referring to weight. Moreover, if you were to use the old imperial measurements then it should have used ‘tons‘?

The metric issue had totally slipped my mind, us old timers still use feet and inches etc. :(
 

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Of course, they could have been referring to the "metric pound" which is half a kilogram. Or perhaps a "troy pound" which is a unit of mass equaling about a third of a kilogram.

Regardless, if the reader didn't notice that the website was from the U.K., then the sentence including "45,000 pound" could be taken for a price or weight.

By the way, I think the new Land Rover really does weigh forty-five thousand pounds, so the discussion is probably moot.

But until the U.K. switches to the Euro, or the U.S. switches to the metric system, I guess we'll never really know. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
zofsuvs said:
But until the U.K. switches to the Euro, or the U.S. switches to the metric system, I guess we'll never really know. ;)
:21: The sooner the better, and if we all join kyoto, drive hybrid Murano's, eat healthy and excersise by pushing the Range Rovers :yodaddy: , I might not even have to emigrate to Mars...
 
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