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I have a 2005 Murano that I bought used almost 5 years ago. Of course now that I'm about to pay the thing off, it seems like everything is going wrong. My transfer case needs resealing, so I'm having that done professionally. I'd like to try and do the work on the suspension myself, since the control arms are relatively cheap. I've never done more than change the oil or tires before. Is it crazy to think that I can do this work myself? I'd love to keep my MO for at least another 3 years (or more).
 

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LCA's are easy. Just need some good air tools! I purchased both of my LCA's online, swapped them out in an afternoon, got the front end realigned, and I was out. Be ready to spend some time abusing the steering knuckle bolt. That thing is HUGE and is probably rusted on right now. I was able to get the nut off with a motivator bar, but the bolt came out hard. Had to use the motivator bar to start it turning, then used an impact wrench to get it spinning some more. Then after all that, had to use a hammer while turning it backwards to get it out. Could definitely tell there was some rust on the surface.

Also, getting the LCA out of the steering knuckle was the next task. Had to pound on it for a while to get it out. But after it was out, the other one went in relatively quickly.
 

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LCA's are easy.

Warhammer is right youll need a long rod that you can attach to a breaker bar and use a lot of force for two of the nuts that are towards the back of the car (Meaning the farthest back nuts) lol
 

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LCA's are easy. Just need some good air tools! I purchased both of my LCA's online, swapped them out in an afternoon, got the front end realigned, and I was out. Be ready to spend some time abusing the steering knuckle bolt. That thing is HUGE and is probably rusted on right now. I was able to get the nut off with a motivator bar, but the bolt came out hard. Had to use the motivator bar to start it turning, then used an impact wrench to get it spinning some more. Then after all that, had to use a hammer while turning it backwards to get it out. Could definitely tell there was some rust on the surface.

Also, getting the LCA out of the steering knuckle was the next task. Had to pound on it for a while to get it out. But after it was out, the other one went in relatively quickly.
Tried it today. What a nightmare. Outcome, need new steering knuckle bolt and nut. Damaged the threads in the process of banging the bolt out. Wish I had air tools.

Next task is getting the actual LCA out of the steering knuckle. Will bang the heck out of it.
 

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attn moderators...perhaps linking this to the other LCA thread?
 

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If you have to pound on the end of a bolt, whenever possible start the nut on the end of the bolt so you won't ruin the threads. You can remove the nut after it breaks loose.
 

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Was able to finish the left side. Used a ball joint separator to get the ball joint out of the steering knuckle. Putting on the new LCA was a piece of cake. Too easy actually.

Doing the right side was the same as the left. Had a hard time getting the spindle knuckle bolt out as it was seized on there pretty good. Banged on it with a huge hammer for a good 20 minutes or so. Finally got the bolt out, damaged it, but I had gotten new bolts and nuts for both sides from the dealer. Getting the single long bolt out was almost impossible as there isn't much room to get a breaker bar in there to loosen. Went to home depot and purchased a cordless impact gun. It helped to at least loosen up the bolt, and then when tightening.

Felt good doing this myself and saving the money I would of paid in labor. Having air tools, or in my case, a cordless electrical impact wrench is a must when doing this job. If I would of had it from the beginning it would of saved a lot of time and aggravation.
 

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I am able to do a lot of car maintenance myself. I would never consider doing suspension work.
If your car is almost paid off expect to use those dollars towards routine maintenance.
That's the price of car ownership and especially since yours is 16 years old.
 

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I am able to do a lot of car maintenance myself. I would never consider doing suspension work.
If your car is almost paid off expect to use those dollars towards routine maintenance.
That's the price of car ownership and especially since yours is 16 years old.
Years ago i mainly did alignments and a lot of front end work. Not that hard of you have the correct tools and aren’t afraid to use a hammer like you own it :) and safety glasses
 

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Be sure you have impact sockets that can take the stress. I remember the first time I tried to remove a nut from the front strut. Applied force to the breaker bar and "snap" my regular chrome socket split in two. Before you go taking everything off, be 100% sure that everything that needs to come off can have its bolt/nut loosened. You don't want to remove nearly everything only to discover the last thing won't budge. Be sure you have all the socket/wrench sizes you need for everything before you dive into the job.
 
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