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I have never given this a moment's notice before but do you leave your Murano parked with the E brake on or off?
Only flatlanders need answer. If you live in a hilly clime, you need to do all that stuff. Set the brake, turn the wheel into the curb etc.
But what about you flatlanders?

Now 75% of my driving has been with 4-5-6 speed manual transmissions. I never used the E barke there, Just put it in First or reverse and left it.
And when I had autos I did not set the brake unless I was on a pretty tough little hill. I knew that there were real gears in the auto transmission, although I freely admit that I don't know how those gears are engaged, or even if they are, in Park.

But here we have a CVT. No gears.
I wonder what happens in there in Park?
Do you use the E brake on essentially flat land?


Homer
 

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I'm sure our tranny must have the equivalent of the 'parking pawl' which is the mechanism in traditional automatics which provides the 'locked driveline' when in 'P'. I believe this is a DOT requirement.

I know lots of people who depend on the parking pawl and never set their parking brake (on flatland, as you say).

I always use the parking brake, but feel the risk is minimal in NOT using it on flat terrain. Once upon a time, it served as insurance that your vehicle would not 'jump' unexpectedly when put into gear (due to fast idle, foot accidently on the gas pedal, etc). However, nowadays, you have to be pushing on the brake pedal to shift out of 'P' anyway, so risk is even lower.
 

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Never have used the e brake on flat land.... with my previous Pulsar I never did (220K) and never had an issue. I'm sure it will not harm the CVT. Some suggest to use the e brake to keep it free and moving (cable can freeze up) but I've never had an issue with that on the Pulsar and I probably only used it 24 times in its entire 14 years with me.
 

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Just like with most safety features on all cars, when in doubt always use it.

I have lived in areas of flat to hilly, and my opinion is always... I would rather be in the habit of doing it rather than not. When you are in the habit of doing something, you protect yourself from not doing it when it should have been done.

But that is just me.
 

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never use it on flat.........but that me. it is good? i do not know. P seems to have worked for me so far.

i agree with "habit" though.
 

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I used to....till the E got frozen one day!:3:


Now i use E only when parking on an uneven road.
 

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You should always use the ebrake. In high crime areas, a lot of cars are stolen by simply towing them away. The Murano technically (even AWD) can be towed by the rear wheels if you do not set the ebrake.
 

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I have lived in the Midwest all my life (Chicago). In my thirty+ years of driving, I never used the e-brake on automatic transmissions after parking the car (the parking pawl holds the car in place, not the transmission gears, per se). On manual transmissions (which I mostly drove), I always used the e-brake, even when leaving the car in gear. Once I left it in gear on a slight incline (no e-brake) but didn't realize it wasn't fully in-gear and it popped into neutral. The car gently rolled down the incline and into the street!! Fortunately, it was late at night and no cars were around. Talk about lucky!

I have never had that problem with an automatic when leaving it in PARK, even on hills (bridges, overpasses, etc. No mountains in Chicago). However, dis-use of the e-brakes often led to a lot of corrosion on the e-brake line (which is a direct cable connection to the rear brakes), especially over many Chicago winters. I have had cables freeze in position locking the brakes, on automatic transmission vehicles. Not good. I have also had the cable break from rust. However, I never had that problem on MT's since the e-brake was put to regular use.

Now that I have an automatic transmission (CVT), I make it a habit of using the e-brake at least once a month just to make sure it is in working order. It is also a good idea to have the system checked whenever you go in for routine maintenance.

Unfortunately, in high crime areas, setting the e-brake is a minor deterrent. The stealer will simple break into the car (pop the lock or bust the window) and release the brake. They can also lift the car at one end, drop it on a dolly and tow from the other end. I have watched many a Chicago Police tow truck tow away all kinds of vehicles (especially at the airports). They have no problem popping locks or using the dolly trick. If they can do that, you can bet the bad guys will use the same 'tricks of the trade'.
 

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Actually it you think about it, its not really an emergency brake in the Murano - its a parking brake. I suppose a lever type brake can be thought of as an ebrake, since you can hold the button in and pull up on the handle to manually brake without "locking" the rear wheels and snapping the cable. However, with the Murano's foot parking brake, there is no way to manually modulate the brake pressure, once you step down, it is locked into place. Thus it only serves one purpose - as a parking brake.

I can read all day about why people do not use the parking brake. Thats fine if you want to put pressure on the parking pawl. On my 97 Maxima, if I did not set the parking brake, it would be difficult to shift out of park the next time I drove the car, even if I was parked on level terrain.
 
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