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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so can anyone please explain to me how the maintenance schedule works? I’m a bit confused with the month time frames. There’s 2 of the 6 months schedules and 2 of the 12 months and so forth. How do I know what needs replacing let’s say next time I go to my appointment? My next appt is in January and it will be my second 6 month checkup since I bought my car. I barely have around 1,500 miles since I don’t drive much. I mean they always do a multipoint inspection during my oil changes every 6 months and they tell me what my car needs at the moment but I just wanna know how to follow the schedule list. Help! Lol 🥲
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If you’re barely driving the amount of miles mentioned then you follow months like you’re doing. That if you want to stick strictly to what the schedule shows. So the 12 months one will be on your second 6 month visit. 18 month on your 3rd 6 month visit. Unless you’re asking something else….
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
If you’re barely driving the amount of miles mentioned then you follow months like you’re doing. That if you want to stick strictly to what the schedule shows. So the 12 months one will be on your second 6 month visit. 18 month on your 3rd 6 month visit. Unless you’re asking something else….
Ok but which 12 month schedule do I follow next. As you can see there’s 2 of them in the book. Just how there’s 2 of the 6 month schedule.
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I reflected on this, and it turns out to be a bit driven by automotive knowledge. If I had to summarize it in one sentence, I'd say "go by mileage for all systems which don't age while the car is sitting."

For strictly mechanical systems, I'd go by mileage. Brake pads don't wear out sitting, so if it took me 3 years to hit 10,000 miles I wouldn't be worried about the brake pads or exhaust or hood struts at 12 or 24 months, because they're essentially new.

For parts which age like hoses and belts (which oxidize) I'd check them annually. But by check, I mean "lay hands on momentarily and make sure they're OK." That's 30 seconds worth of work, looking for cracks or deterioration. Belts especially can crack with age, and hoses can go soft.

I would do annual oil and filter changes, and coolant and brake fluid flushes every 3 years regardless of mileage.

You won't go wrong doing checks by time period, but you'll waste some money on service fees.

As they say on the Interwebs, YMMV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I reflected on this, and it turns out to be a bit driven by automotive knowledge. If I had to summarize it in one sentence, I'd say "go by mileage for all systems which don't age while the car is sitting."

For strictly mechanical systems, I'd go by mileage. Brake pads don't wear out sitting, so if it took me 3 years to hit 10,000 miles I wouldn't be worried about the brake pads or exhaust or hood struts at 12 or 24 months, because they're essentially new.

For parts which age like hoses and belts (which oxidize) I'd check them annually. But by check, I mean "lay hands on momentarily and make sure they're OK." That's 30 seconds worth of work, looking for cracks or deterioration. Belts especially can crack with age, and hoses can go soft.

I would do annual oil and filter changes, and coolant and brake fluid flushes every 3 years regardless of mileage.

You won't go wrong doing checks by time period, but you'll waste some money on service fees.

As they say on the Interwebs, YMMV.
What about tire rotations? I know someone told me once a year? But idk I mean since I don’t drive much then at how many miles then? 😅 lol
 

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I would rotate on mileage instead of time. Tire manufacturer will determine the mileage, but 5 to 8000 miles seems appropriate to rotate
 
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Ok but which 12 month schedule do I follow next. As you can see there’s 2 of them in the book. Just how there’s 2 of the 6 month schedule. View attachment 53981
Based on what you have circled one (10,000 miles) says not applicable for standard service and to do it at next interval. I imagine with your situation you would probably fall under standard main needs so you would do the 15,000 mile one. Only reason I’m a stickler for following the manuals directions while under warranty is because I owned a car before where the manufacturer wouldn’t honor the warranty because although I got my services done at the correct mileage it was after the months and they claimed I didn’t follow correctly because it said to do it by miles or months…whichever comes first. Same thing this manual says. So to avoid any potential issues I follow as it states.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
'

Based on what you have circled one (10,000 miles) says not applicable for standard service and to do it at next interval. I imagine with your situation you would probably fall under standard main needs so you would do the 15,000 mile one. Only reason I’m a stickler for following the manuals directions while under warranty is because I owned a car before where the manufacturer wouldn’t honor the warranty because although I got my services done at the correct mileage it was after the months and they claimed I didn’t follow correctly because it said to do it by miles or months…whichever comes first. Same thing this manual says. So to avoid any potential issues I follow as it states.
Oh ok. So if I’m supposed to be following the standard maintenance schedules, I noticed that in every standard maintenance schedules it says to rotate tires every 6 months then? I thought tire rotations were like once every 12 months. What do you think? Or should I do that one according to the miles? Because I went in for my oil change in august like 4 months after I bought my car and they didn’t rotate my tires. During inspection it said they didn’t need it yet. I’m due for my next appt in January. That way I can tell them to rotate them in January for sure
 

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I would not rotate tires until you have 5000-6000 miles on the car. The point is to even out tire wear between front and rear due to mileage and has nothing to do with time. No dealer is gonna deny warranty coverage because you didn't get tires rotated.

As Pilgrim suggested, have your oil and oil filter changed once a year even if you are under 5000 miles. Do brake fluid at 3 years. Air filters should be changed based on mileage.
 
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I also agree - 5K miles is an appropriate rotation schedule.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Awesome! Thanks you! The dealer usually tells me when they need
I would not rotate tires until you have 5000-6000 miles on the car. The point is to even out tire wear between front and rear due to mileage and has nothing to do with time. No dealer is gonna deny warranty coverage because you didn't get tires rotated.

As Pilgrim suggested, have your oil and oil filter changed once a year even if you are under 5000 miles. Do brake fluid at 3 years. Air filters should be changed based on mileage.
Awesome thank you! I just let the dealer tell
Me what’s due to be changed during the inspection 😊
 

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I strongly recommend that you keep an auto record book in the car. Before your dealer tries to sell you an air filter when yours has only 2000 miles in it, you should check your records.

My favorite is the At-A-Glance record book: https://smile.amazon.com/AT-GLANCE-...08fe7&pd_rd_wg=PJMus&pd_rd_i=B0006HUIAO&psc=1

Not cheap, but it has nicely laid out sections for mileage, repairs, lubrication, tires, etc. It also fits nicely in your glove box. Every car I buy, new or used, gets one of these.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I strongly recommend that you keep an auto record book in the car. Before your dealer tries to sell you an air filter when yours has only 2000 miles in it, you should check your records.

My favorite is the At-A-Glance record book: https://smile.amazon.com/AT-GLANCE-...08fe7&pd_rd_wg=PJMus&pd_rd_i=B0006HUIAO&psc=1

Not cheap, but it has nicely laid out sections for mileage, repairs, lubrication, tires, etc. It also fits nicely in your glove box. Every car I buy, new or used, gets one of these.
Thank you! 😊
 

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Oh ok. So if I’m supposed to be following the standard maintenance schedules, I noticed that in every standard maintenance schedules it says to rotate tires every 6 months then? I thought tire rotations were like once every 12 months. What do you think? Or should I do that one according to the miles? Because I went in for my oil change in august like 4 months after I bought my car and they didn’t rotate my tires. During inspection it said they didn’t need it yet. I’m due for my next appt in January. That way I can tell them to rotate them in January for sure
My tires are rotated by mileage so it‘s done at or near every 5,000 miles. For me that comes out to every 6 months. I do it with my oil changes so I’m not making extra trips for service but if you do your own maintenance like so many on here do or you don’t mind going in for separate services then you can go when it’s right for you. Again, I follow the schedule because I had an experience where they were nitpicking about services not performed to the t. And it was a service that had abs nothing to do with the issue that was happening. Not was it a major main item or a completely ignored one (they denied because the service was done 601 miles after it should have been done but still within the month range). “They” was a Nissan dealership for a 2014 Nissan Rogue Select and Nissan Corporation denied the appeal. That may not be the norm but it was enough for me not to take the chance again...so it’s just the way I personally do things while my car is still under warranty.
 

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My wife has a 2020 which is coming on 13 months old and has 5,800 miles mostly highway. I plan to go ahead and do th first oil change now and rotate the tires as it is coming up on 6k miles. I will keep this OC and tire rotation on this mileage timeline (not months) if the car is driven in the manner. I will change the brake fluid and coolant after 3 years regardless of the mileage and maybe the PS fluid . I am still pondering when to do the first transmission drain and fill. I know it will be much sooner than the what the book says. I personally inspect the car every month.
 

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Coolant interval in the Murano (at least my '18) is 7 years or 105k miles so I would not bother changing coolant before 7 years... (Our '17 Subaru says the original coolant can go for 11 years or 137.5k miles!)

I have not decided what I'm going to do about the Murano or Subaru CVT fluids either.
 

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I strongly recommend that you keep an auto record book in the car. Before your dealer tries to sell you an air filter when yours has only 2000 miles in it, you should check your records.

My favorite is the At-A-Glance record book: https://smile.amazon.com/AT-GLANCE-...08fe7&pd_rd_wg=PJMus&pd_rd_i=B0006HUIAO&psc=1

Not cheap, but it has nicely laid out sections for mileage, repairs, lubrication, tires, etc. It also fits nicely in your glove box. Every car I buy, new or used, gets one of these.
Agreed, keep track off all what you have done

I keep it all in mobile app, multiple cars

It keeps track of everything, can remind you and provides nice statistics. All dats sync with cloud and can be restored at any time and synced between devices.

But nothing wrong with hard book, it might be even better.


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