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Who the hell do they have coding and operating their web site? Holy crap!

I just received a "welcome" packet in the mail, encouraging me to sign onto www.nissanowner.com for all this wonderful crap that they're offering me. I figured "what the hey, let's get a little more info."

Well, first off, I couldn't sign in because the forms on their sign-in page don't support Firefox: big mistake number 1. So I switch over to Exploder because, well, that's sort-of excusable (if I happen to be in a good mood at the time).

That lets me sign in, but then I need to fill out this HUGE form with all kinds of information about myself, my purchase habits, etc, without telling how any of this info is going to be used: big mistake number 2. I hope someone at Nissan appreciates my sense of humor regarding my name/address/etc.

I made sure to UNCHECK the "send me crap" boxes, but then on the next page it shows them checked and asks me to confirm or edit the info. I hit Edit and I get javascript exception text at the top of my screen: big mistake number 3 (not knowing how to code a frickin' web page).

No biggie, it's not my real e-mail address anyway, so I hit confirm and head on to what I figure is the meat of the site. Nope, it has problems and crashes the page again, this time actually handling the error somewhat appropriately and telling me I need to go back to the homepage. Fine. Go back, log in again, and BOOM, I'm hit with ANOTHER form that I need to fill out, a lot of which is the same info I JUST FILLED OUT!!!!! Big mistake number 4, making me fill out my bogus info 2 times too many.

Now I'm finally in the real site, open to info. Guess what it is? Just the nissanusa.com site, but with a little bit of info on the left column about me. Gee, thanks. That was really frickin' helpful.

But let's continue. I start clicking on a few things, and about 50% of the time I get another javascript exception.

:banghead: <sigh>

So then I give up and sign onto my forum to gripe and relieve some tension.

:11:

I feel much better now, thanks!
 

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Ahhh, yes, Marketing people... Lost in their imaginary world again!
 

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I received the same packet a while back and jumped thru all there hoops and did't get anything usefull either. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Ohio Murano said:
I received the same packet a while back and jumped thru all there hoops and did't get anything usefull either. :cool:
I guess that's why all of us are here on this forum, where we CAN get useful info! :)
 

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The only thing it's good for is to remind you that you need an oil change. You can also find every now and then service coupons. Now that is worth something, but I think you can still get those coupons without signing on. :rolleyes:
 

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Corin, not laughing at you but reading that post made me laugh because I can feel your pain. They could just simplify the process at the Nissan site with link to this site. :4:
 

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They haven't told me I need my oil changed and I've had my Mo since December. Also I haven't received any coupons. I think I'm getting screwed!!! :cool:
 

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I've got a great "marketing" story. I was Chief Systems Architect, for DeepGreen Bank. (www.deepgreenbank.com), for about 3.5 years. When we launched, in 2000, the Chief Marketing Officer (didn't own a computer at home, but, was the CMO for an internet only bank...hmmmm, should have known something right there), comes to us and says he paid $50,000 for a 2 minute "flash" movie that "sets the tone" for DeepGreen. My eyebrows raise, because in 2000, less than 5% of the world had broadband access. We warned him that it would take up to 10 minutes for the movie to download, and it would effectively "block" access to our website, not to mention, we'd "inflict" this movie on anyone who inadvertantly deleted their "cookies", where we stored the fact we had exposed ourselves before, to them. We argued, and argued, and finally, we hooked up a PC, dialed up, showed him. He still didn't understand the problem. So we went to the CEO and showed him...after about 2 minutes of waiting, he asked, "What's wrong with the site?" We explained what was going on! (DUH!), and he reluctantly told his "friend" that we'd have to remove the movie (But, how will we set the "feel" for our new company, thought the CMO? I had a smart ass remark, that was inappropriate, but true...when I said: "They can find out that we are disruptive, slow, and get in the way of them getting what they need from us, the old fashioned way...by working with us!)

Marketing, 2 drink minimum!

BTW, there are marketing folks out there that use analytics, primary and secondary research, and good technique to identify product attributes, segmentation. I LOVE working with them. They typically, however, have a computer at home.

Regards,

Big
 

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I know that sinking feeling, big_daddy_mpd.

Back several years ago I was leading a project to convert a part of a large financial institution that performed services for other large companies from all-batch processing to online, real-time processing.

The office manager kept going on and on about how getting immediate answers for the executives of other companies would save time (and money) and enhance the bank's reputation (and justify any rate increases).

This was back in the mainframe days.
When we showed him the network diagram for the office he asked "What's this thing on my desk?" We told him it was his terminal. He nixed that notion right then and there saying that working with computers was the job of "my girls".

So the old way of getting answers for went like this:
Manager gets the request.
Manager writes the request on a form.
Manager calls one of "his girls", who gets the form out of his special out box.
"His girl" fills out a run request form and walks it down (8 floors) to the computer room and submits it to operations.
Operations queues up the request (using punched cards!) and runs it.
The output (a single-pager) is put in the departments report box where the manager's "girl" picks it up.
The output is walked back upstairs and put in the manager's in box.
The manager's "girl" goes back to her desk and calls the manager to notify him that the output is in the in box.
The manager calls the client and gives the result.

Turnaround was usually half a day. Two hours if it was an "emergency" request.
Oh, the out and in boxes are on the manager's desk, by the way.

The way we envisioned the process:
Manager gets an information request ("his girls" were not allowed to speak directly with the clients).
Manager uses his terminal to get the information.
Manager reads the response to the client.
If the client wants the printed response, the manager can print the results and one of "the girls" can mail it to the client.

We showed that turnaround would usually take less time than it would take for the manager to fill in the form he normally put in his out box.

The actual resulting process ended up like this:
Manager gets the request.
Manager writes the request on a form.
Manager calls one of "his girls", who gets the form out of his special out box.
"His girl" uses her terminal to queue up an information request job (she is not allowed to perform queries).
"His girl" waits at least one hour the walks down (8 floors) to the computer room to see if the output is ready.
The output is walked back upstairs and put in the manager's in box.
The manager's "girl" goes back to her desk and calls the manager to notify him that the output is in the in box.
The manager calls the client and gives the result.

New, improved turnaround time: one to three hours.
What a savings!!!
 
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