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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 2015 Murano SV with 65000 miles. The transmission has died and since I am over 60,000 miles I don't think it will be covered under warranty .It is going to cost around $4000 to repair. It has been a very good car, not too many major repairs until now. Do I fix it or put a downpayment on a new car.


Suggestions?
 

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Depends on whether you trust another transmission that failed on you at a ridiculously low mileage. I don’t intend to ever own a Nissan CVT longer than 60,000 miles. The fact another one died at 65K and customer is just screwed reinforced my logic.

I would not. I would fix it and dump it. It could fail in 15,000 miles and you’ve played Nissan’s game (read: Scam) twice.
 

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if the rest of the car is in good shape, and you can get a good deal on the trans, then the only reason to get a new car is if you want a new car.

I just got my MO transmission replaced by dealer , luckily for me it was under warranty. I plan to keep the car for 2 more years .
 

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I'd like to hear from owners that have over 100,000 miles on their CVT transmissions as to how their transmissions are functioning.
 

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I cant imagine that all Muramo CVT fail so early. It must be a small portion. its just that we hear about the failures on the forum because no one is going to start a thread talking about how theirs is still functioning.

I'm curious to know if the 3rd gen CVT failure rate is similar to other transmissions. Anyone know?
 

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I cant imagine that all Muramo CVT fail so early. It must be a small portion. its just that we hear about the failures on the forum because no one is going to start a thread talking about how theirs is still functioning.

I'm curious to know if the 3rd gen CVT failure rate is similar to other transmissions. Anyone know?
If you look at the total number of Murano's produced, to the number of reported CVT failures, it is less then .005%, with most failures in the 2003 year.


If you look at the total number of CVT's that Jasco produces, I'm sure that you'll find that percentage number is even lower.


I always keep this little nugget in the back of my mind when reading some of the issues here on the forum:


"A bad experience will get talked about 100 times, a good experience only 10 times."


Have a good day.
 

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I cant imagine that all Muramo CVT fail so early. It must be a small portion. its just that we hear about the failures on the forum because no one is going to start a thread talking about how theirs is still functioning.

I'm curious to know if the 3rd gen CVT failure rate is similar to other transmissions. Anyone know?
If you look at the total number of Murano's produced, to the number of reported CVT failures, it is less then .005%, with most failures in the 2003 year.


If you look at the total number of CVT's that Jasco produces, I'm sure that you'll find that percentage number is even lower.


I always keep this little nugget in the back of my mind when reading some of the issues here on the forum:


"A bad experience will get talked about 100 times, a good experience only 10 times."


Have a good day.
Sleeping easy tonight.....
 

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If you look at the total number of Murano's produced, to the number of reported CVT failures, it is less then .005%, with most failures in the 2003 year.


If you look at the total number of CVT's that Jasco produces, I'm sure that you'll find that percentage number is even lower.


I always keep this little nugget in the back of my mind when reading some of the issues here on the forum:


"A bad experience will get talked about 100 times, a good experience only 10 times."


Have a good day.
Great post, thanks for the information.
 

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If you look at the total number of Murano's produced, to the number of reported CVT failures, it is less then .005%, with most failures in the 2003 year.


If you look at the total number of CVT's that Jasco produces, I'm sure that you'll find that percentage number is even lower.


I always keep this little nugget in the back of my mind when reading some of the issues here on the forum:


"A bad experience will get talked about 100 times, a good experience only 10 times."


Have a good day.


My own observations say otherwise. I hear about it all the time. Two of the only people I know who’ve had Muranos had the CVT die.

A friend of mine said her mom was getting a new fake-Murano Lexus. I asked her why and she said her mom’s 2015 Murano transmission went out and will cost $5000 to fix.

People can rationalize it away if they so choose, but a pragmatic person will notice there’s a real problem in my opinion.
 

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What PaulDay's post captures and Robotaz's misses is the idea of sample size.



You may think that since 3 out of 3 (or 100%) of Murano's that you're personally aware of had a CVT problem, means that the 100% of the rest of the population has the problem. But in reality, you're making an assumption on ~200,000 vehicles based on only three (0.0015% of 3rd gen MOs).


I think a pragmatic person would look at a significant sample size to form an opinion.
 

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I will tell you that I had 6 Ford Explorers from 2004 to 2016. I had transmission failures in 3 of the 6. Does that mean that 50% of Fords will have transmission failures? Absolutely not. However, I have heard of many more Ford transmission failures that Nissan CVTs. What that shows, is that there are a lot more Fords in this country than there are Nissans.


Point being that anything mechanical can fail at any point in time. Don't draw conclusions from something posted on a forum.
 

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What PaulDay's post captures and Robotaz's misses is the idea of sample size.



You may think that since 3 out of 3 (or 100%) of Murano's that you're personally aware of had a CVT problem, means that the 100% of the rest of the population has the problem. But in reality, you're making an assumption on ~200,000 vehicles based on only three (0.0015% of 3rd gen MOs).


I think a pragmatic person would look at a significant sample size to form an opinion.


Thanks for that clarification.

I have an electrical engineering degree and a masters in math. I understand sample size, statistics, and infomatics very well.

What I say, and will continue to say, is that my own observations cannot be denied. The probability that I’m in a tiny, isolated 100% sample size, within and relative to a tiny overall sample size with the opposite trends, is statistically much smaller than the transmissions having a relatively high failure rate.

If you ignore the observations of others around you, who have no statistical predisposition to having skewed observations, and instead fall back on speculative conjecture about industry-standard fail rates (which frankly nobody here knows anything about if we’re honest), then I don’t know what to say that can help.

I stand by my observations. The CVT is problematic relative to all transmissions, and frankly relative to all car parts that I have ever heard of. The fact that it continues on and is not isolated just rams it home. I will not personally own my Murano after the warranty is up. Period. My wife’s, I expect to dump $5K at any time after the warranty is up and we lived the bad lesson so many seem to have to live through.

This topic is no different than any other fail rate topics on car forums. People want to believe they’re not next and have a warm, fuzzy feeling about their cars. On some forums, people stating the obvious are attacked (e.g, Mustangs, Civics, etc.). Ask me how I know. Im not in denial. It’s a problematic transmission and I feel that any reasonable person can agree.
 

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My own observations say otherwise. I hear about it all the time. Two of the only people I know who’ve had Muranos had the CVT die.

A friend of mine said her mom was getting a new fake-Murano Lexus. I asked her why and she said her mom’s 2015 Murano transmission went out and will cost $5000 to fix.

People can rationalize it away if they so choose, but a pragmatic person will notice there’s a real problem in my opinion.
I agree with Paul,


If you go to a Honda or Toyota forum, I bet you will hear the same horror stories about CVT failing early.
I don't think the CVT design changes that much from one car manufacturer to the next, they are pretty much the same, and it has its pros and cons. If CVT bothers you that much, then you should not drive a CVT.


I was on the same boat as the OP, 2015 nissan murano SV, CVT failed early, it was completely dead, the car would not move forward in drive. Took it in, they said CVT needs to be changed, they did not tell me why it failed. But since the change, I am now at 95,000 miles and no issues (touching wood...)
 

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Wait. Are we talking about the Murano CVT compared to other CVTs? Or are we talking about Murano CVT fail rates in general? Two different conversations.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Thanks guys for all the comments. I shop around at transmission shops and my mechanic is asking for $3500 . Also he is giving me a 3yr, 100000mile warranty while the other shops where only 2yr, 24000mile warranty. I am also talking to Dealer, he said that best he can do is $4800 but he will just give 12months/12k warranty. So thats for sure that I am getting the Murano repaired and will plan to sell after 3 years . Hopefully, without any more problems it will go to over 100000miles. Thanks for the help.
 

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Sleeping easy tonight.....
Well stated. IMHO, there are three types of CVT failure. They are:

1. Design/Manufacturing defects.

2. Driver Abuse.

3. The Act of God.

In the absence of #3 , I attribute the majority of the reported failure to #2 rather than #1 . Nissan could not stay in business if the CVT core has major flaws. Some folks may forget that this vehicle is NOT an SUV.......... >:D
 

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I'd like to hear from owners that have over 100,000 miles on their CVT transmissions as to how their transmissions are functioning.
My '04 Altima had right at 100,000 miles when I traded it in for a 2009 Maxima.
The 2009 Max had around 110,000 miles when I traded in for my 2017 Platinum Max.
Wife's '04 Murano had around 110,000 miles when we traded it in for a 2011 Murano. That vehicle just turned over 110,000 miles and we will probably keep it for another year or so. A fluid drain and refill was done on each one at around 90,000 miles. Not one issue with any of them. Love that CVT.

Probably most of the people that talk down the CVT's have never owned a vehicle with one.
 

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My 07 Murano had about 110K miles when the transfer case grenaded and split in half. Dropped in a used transfer case, sold the car immediately.

I thought I detected some looseness in the tranny before this happened, but it could have been the transfer case.

I bought a BMW 3-series wagon with AWD and 98K miles. It's now at 126K miles and hasn't missed a beat.
 

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07Murano FWD .. fluid drained&refilled (myself) every 30Kmiles. Traded in from 2017.5 Murano FWD, at 159Kmiles ... while everything else got old, the trans was the only thing that was still working like new.
I'm thankful Nissan doesn't take away the fill-tube.... will do the same 30K drains&refills. (My 14Avalon comes with "WorldStandard" life-time fluid and Toyota took away the fill-tube ... We don't even "need" to check the fluid at all.. haha
that makes me worry).
 
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