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I have some left over Pennzoil Platinum 5w20. Can I use it on my 2015 Murano without causing engine problem or should I stick with 0w20 as recommended by Nissan?
As long as "left over" is not some open container of oil that's been sitting on your shelf for a year then the minor difference between the OEM-spec oil is not a big deal.
 
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I have some left over Pennzoil Platinum 5w20. Can I use it on my 2015 Murano without causing engine problem or should I stick with 0w20 as recommended by Nissan?
If it's the same brand (Pennz Platinum) that you're already running, OK to add it. Otherwise you're playing with the oil chemistry.
 

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5w20 should be fine.

From the '15 owner's manual:
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Although the specification for my '19 mentions to ONLY use synthetic, so 5w-20 would not qualify...

From my '19 owner's manual:
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As much as people get concerned about this, a difference of 5 in viscosity on the low end isn't going to hurt anything. Many of the oil weights recommended today are as much to raise gas mileage as for their actual function.

There are good reasons why people might use oils with viscosities slightly different from the factory recommendation. As long as they have some idea why they're doing it, no harm done.

If you're driving a collector car that's 30+ years old, the oil recommendations are likely to be outdated in terms of what's available today. Oils have come a LOOONG way in sophistication and chemistry. In that case, the owner is on their own to research good options. My 1958 Fiat 1200 Spyder owner's manual specifically recommended "non-detergent oil." EEEEK! In today's world I'd never do that.
 

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OP said "Pennzoil Platinum 5w20 ". Pennzoil Platinum is synthetic.
It also mentions specifies that in addition to it needing to be synthetic, it must be an equivalent to 0w20 GF-5 SN for '19 Murano if Nissan's oil is not used...

Would a heavier weight cold weather oil spec cause any problems even if synthetic in a '19 Murano? Who knows... How much has the engine internal designed changed since the previous year's oil specification? Not much I would guess...
 

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My 1958 Fiat 1200 Spyder owner's manual specifically recommended "non-detergent oil." EEEEK! In today's world I'd never do that.
Back in the last century, mid 70's, I had given to me a '61 Buick Invicta that had a 455 Wildcat engine. Deciding to do a little cleanup and add a some horsepower, I pulled the heads to have them ported, with new valves and seats in prep for a new intake manifold and a Holly double pumper carb.

Pulling the valve covers, the covers and heads were covered in over an inch of sludge. While cleaning, the sludge had a gray color to it. The previous owner had only used the old Pennsylvania Dutch oil, which was very high in clay back then.

After assembly, I used a better high detergent oil and drove 500 miles and did an oil change. The oil that came out looked like it had never been changed. Filled it back up with new oil and a new filter.

Less then 100 miles down the road, that engine started smoking like a run away diesel engine with blue smoke every time you stepped on the gas.

After a little research and talking to a few old timers, it seems that factory engines before about '64 or so, actually relied on a certain amount of sludge to seal and protect the piston rings because of looser tolerances. Hard lesson learned, had to rebuild the entire engine, just because of some oil.

Always use what the manufacturer recommends, prevents issues further down the road.

Have a good day.
 

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Great response, Paul! I wonder how many generations of oil technology our posts covered?

In 1971 I bought a 1966 GTO that had been run hard and put up very hot and wet. It actually burned a quart of oil every 50 miles when I got it!! I suspect it had been run so hot that the rings lost their temper. It was kind of cool to be able to lay down an oil fog whenever I wanted to, though.

One rebuild later, it ran great on Havoline detergent oil. Two different causes, but a similar outcome.
 
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