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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I have a 2015 Mo and CEL code of P0037 & P0138. Those are calling attention to a bank 1 sensor 2 issue. Took the quick route and replaced it myself. No luck. Took it to Nissan and they said (originally) that it is bank 1 sensor 1 causing sensor 2 to read the error. Didn't quite believe it but okay so changed that one myself after paying their diagnostic fee. Nope not the problem codes came back. Brought to Nissan again and I said just fix it! They now said it is bank 1 sensor 2 (the original one I replaced). After pulling down the exhaust system they said the sensor (only 2 weeks installed) is rusted on and I need to replace the CAT and the sensor since they can't get it out ($3,000+). Told them put it back together ($550 for that work) and still no fix. Any help? Seems to me the problem is not the sensor but something causing the sensor to read that error. Any advice is much appreciated, money is tough and I'm handy but have no idea what to look at next and can't pay these people $3,000+ on top of what I have paid already. Thank you all so much!
 

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I don't know anything about the 3rd Gen MO O2/airflow sensors, but on my 2003 AWD that had CA emissions, I started throwing a couple related codes around 2017. I removed all the sensors and cleaned them, then cleaned up the electrical connectors and cleared the codes, and that worked. Then around March 2019 I think it was bank 1, sensor 2 that failed, so i replaced it (I had to in order to pass the upcoming State inspection) and I cleared the light and it was fine. I'm assuming that after you replaced the sensor that CEL cleared or any related DTC you cleared with your scan tool and the code is returning. Not sure how much I'd trust the dealership you're going to since it seems someone is either lying to you or is incompetent.

Once again, not familiar with the 3rd Gens, but my 1st Gen could still run fine without those sensors hooked up, but the CEL was always on, and if in a state that requires an emissions test every so often, the car would instantly fail. From my experience, the sensors are merely monitors that don't perform a "necessary" function of communicating information to another system that might adjust fuel-air mixtures in response to that data; they're there (I believe) simply to let you know your emissions are dirty and probably polluting the enivorment, so something isn't operating optimally. On the 3rd Gen, that might not be the case, meaning that sensor data may be used to adjust trim mixtures. If that's the case, a bad or non-working sensor might cause poorer fuel economy and perhaps inconsistent or rough idling

Have you tried having Autozone, O'Reilly's or Advanced Auto Parts read your error codes to see if they arrive at the same conclusion? Not all DIY scanners will be able to see every code that's stored in your ECM or PCM. The Nissan tech should have been able to see everything, though. Did you ask if other codes were stored anywhere? Maybe double-check as much of the wiring as you can that leads to that sensor to make sure there's no break in the wires and that the connector pins/contacts aren't broken off or bent. You might also be able to return the sensor you bought and tell them it didn't work, and that you'd like to swap it for a different one. BTW, did the sensor you buy mate up correctly with the stock electrical connector on your car, or did it come with some universal wiring adapter that had to be used in order for it to hook up? If the latter, that's a bad design that would likely cause problems, particularly if you had to use those crimp-splice connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. The sensor was an exact fit model so no splicing. It does run rough and gets horrible gas mileage since this started. Yes I cleared the codes after each replacement and they keep coming back. Definitely don't trust the dealership at this point. Think since they have no new cars to sell the are trying to cover costs on service.
 

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Did you or Nissan perform a voltage test on those sensor connections to confirm they're getting the correct current? It might not be a physical sensor that's the problem but an electrical/wiring glitch somewhere before the sensor or even within the ECM (probably rare it would be the ECM).

BTW, it is possible that you have a bad CAT on that bank, and that's why your sensor is always triggering the CEL because the emissions specs are running outside of the desired parameters. It's not impossible. On my 2003, both CATS failed somewhere around 2008 at the 45,000 mile mark, and Nissan replaced both under warranty. Those replacement CATs still worked okay as of 2021 with the help of adding lacquer thinner to the fuel over the last few years to help clean them out. :) However, there are specific codes thrown when a CAT starts to fail, and I'd think a CAT code would throw before excess emissions would possibly trigger a faulty sensor code. Addtionally, I'm not sure those sensors have the ability to trigger anything other than "working or not working" to the ECM as a result of an under-voltage, bad wire or a failing/clogged sensor. If a bad CAT failed to throw its respective code of P0420 or P0430, I doubt that would automatically trigger the sensors along that bank to suddenly show a problem until at the point where the dirty emissions have clogged the sensor screens and made it trigger a code. I would surmise that since the new sensor didn't solve the problem, and that it's unlikely a bad CAT would clog that new sensor so quickly, that you have a voltage problem somewhere or possibly a compromised wire somewhere. Maybe a wire's jacket/insulation has worn away somewhere and is causing a problem.

EDIT: that your car is getting poor fuel economy and running rough suggests that either the sensors play a more active role in the operation of the engine, and/or you have a CAT that's clogging up. However, you could have a failing ignition coil, fouled spark plug, torn air intake boot, etc, etc... On such a new car, I don't think I'd want to use lacquer thinner in the fuel. If it were me (and if not under the gun to get a code cleared to pass an upcoming State inspection) I'd start using the highest octane fuel possible for at least a few tanks, and get out on the highway and heat up the CATs to try to burn out any small obstructions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
They didn't say if they checked the voltage. I doubt it since they are just parts swappers. I agree it seems like something else is causing this sensor to throw the codes. I told him when your smoke alarm goes off do you just change it or do you actually check if there is a fire! LOL
 

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They didn't say if they checked the voltage. I doubt it since they are just parts swappers. I agree it seems like something else is causing this sensor to throw the codes. I told him when your smoke alarm goes off do you just change it or do you actually check if there is a fire! LOL
I added some info to my previous post, so you might want to revisit it.

After you replaced the sensor the first time and cleared the code(s), did the code(s) return immediately or did it stay off for a period of time? If that latter, was that minutes, hours or days before it triggered again? Knowing the circumstances of how quickly it returned might help to pinpoint the problem. If it didn't return until after a couple of days of driving, it's likely not a bad new sensor, but perhaps a bad wire that's eventually getting wet or vibrating against something's that's triggering the code. If it's happening immediately after clearing the code, it could still be a defective new sensor and/or a bad wire. But, if the same results and codes are happening with this new sensor that happened with the old sensor, I'd say it's likely a wiring issue somewhere.
 

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Can you still clear the code and have it stay cleared for a period of driving? Just wondering if it's heat, vibration or maybe road moisture (depending on where you live) that may be affecting the connector or wire(s) while driving.

If you can, I would clear the code, start the engine and let it sit running for maybe 15 minutes to see if the code returns. If it doesn't return, keep the car in P and give it some steady gas to increase RPMs and emissions and generate more heat, to see if that triggers the code. If not, try to wiggle that wire around to cause the code to trigger. Maybe even spray a little water onto the connector to see if that triggers the code.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks will try that and yes when I clear the codes they stay off of a little bit. I live in IL so cold and sometimes damp - no snow yet though :)
 

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Depending on what happens you'll want to keep track of things. Example....if letting the car idle from a cold start and the code triggers after five minutes, clear the code and turn off the car and let it get cold again and then run the engine again in park and see if the code triggers after the same amount if time etc. For wiggling the wire it would be helpful to have someone looking at the CEL area as someone methodically manipulates a small area of the sensor wire. Just tugging on the sensor wire all over the place without being able to know exactly when the code triggers and where you were on the wire and what you were doing will create more of a challenge in figurimy things out. Not sure how accessible the wiring is on the 2015. Somebody here might know what the voltage is supposed to be at the sensor so you can test it with a meter.
 

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You need to troubleshoot the heater circuit fault first because an O2 sensor without a functional heater won't work very well (...an A/F sensor wouldn't work at all). The ECM actively monitors the O2 sensor heater circuits so if your scan tool can access Mode $06, look up the test results for the B1S2 heater since it would be useful to know what voltage the ECM actually measured, which caused it to throw the P0037 code (e.g. 0.0 volts--open circuit vs. some low voltage--excessive resistance). If you're not sure if your scan tool has this functionality, post the brand/model number.

As far as testing, check that you have battery power on the heater power feed (Terminal #1--white wire) with ignition on and that you have continuity on the ground wire (Terminal #2--light blue wire) that runs to the ECM (Terminal #7); you'll need to disconnect the ECM harness to isolate the circuit. As cryogenix suggested, wiggle the wiring harness while testing to see if there are variations in your measurements.

The link to the service manual for your car is here (see the "Engine Control System" file): https://www.nicoclub.com/nissan-service-manuals

On a side note, you should complain to Nissan corporate since that dealership was clearly trying to rip you off.

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Cryogenix1, thank you so much for all your help! In the end maybe I got a dud sensor or perhaps it didn't make good electrical contact but swapped it out and seems to be running fine. Thanks again. Happy Holidays!!
I think you solved the problem yourself, but thanks. :) I hope everything stays working. Thinking about one more thing, you probably could've taken the sensor from bank 2 and switched it to bank 1 to see if the problem carried over to that side, provided that side wasn't a completey PITA to remove for testing purposes. I think the only difference may be the color of the electrical connection, but I can't say for sure since I haven't had to mess with any on my 2021...yet. Happy holidays.
 

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Hey, y'all, so my 15 platinum is spitting out code of P0158 (which is bank2 sensors2) and P0037. Seems like we have the same situation. As I tried to read through the whole posts, I didn't quite follow exactly how you got it fixed. Could you please explain again?

What I have done so far.
Pour a bottle of Cat Converter Cleaner to gas tank suggested by Autozone. No luck
Is able to clear the code with OBDII scanner but it just keeps coming back.
About to bite the bullet and replace the sensor but then Autozone suggested it's something else since I only have 34k miles and it's very unusual for the sensor to die that early on.
 

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Hey, y'all, so my 15 platinum is spitting out code of P0158 (which is bank2 sensors2) and P0037. Seems like we have the same situation. As I tried to read through the whole posts, I didn't quite follow exactly how you got it fixed. Could you please explain again?

What I have done so far.
Pour a bottle of Cat Converter Cleaner to gas tank suggested by Autozone. No luck
Is able to clear the code with OBDII scanner but it just keeps coming back.
About to bite the bullet and replace the sensor but then Autozone suggested it's something else since I only have 34k miles and it's very unusual for the sensor to die that early on.
Your car is too new to being using additives in.

Sounds like your sensor is bad for whatever reason, and you could either replace it and hope there's no wiring problem (and that your problem is solved), or take the longer, troubleshooting route to test voltage and check the wiring for breaks to determine what to do next.

The above-poster seemed to solve his problem by replacing the B1S2 twice. It's possible the first one he bought and installed was defective, so he returned it and got another one and things appear to be fine. Before replacing that sensor, I'd at least check the electrical connection at the sensor to ensure it's not cracked or coated with grime, and I'd clean it up with some electronics cleaner spray. If it were me, I'd also just pull the sensor, clean it up, and put it back in to see if that resolved the problem.
 
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Hey, y'all, so my 15 platinum is spitting out code of P0158 (which is bank2 sensors2) and P0037. Seems like we have the same situation. As I tried to read through the whole posts, I didn't quite follow exactly how you got it fixed. Could you please explain again?

What I have done so far.
Pour a bottle of Cat Converter Cleaner to gas tank suggested by Autozone. No luck
Is able to clear the code with OBDII scanner but it just keeps coming back.
About to bite the bullet and replace the sensor but then Autozone suggested it's something else since I only have 34k miles and it's very unusual for the sensor to die that early on.
Well, not quite the same problem. The OP had two codes for the same O2 sensor while you have two codes involving two separate sensors--unless the heater circuit code you're getting is P0057 instead of P0037?
 
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Your car is too new to being using additives in.

Sounds like your sensor is bad for whatever reason, and you could either replace it and hope there's no wiring problem (and that your problem is solved), or take the longer, troubleshooting route to test voltage and check the wiring for breaks to determine what to do next.

The above-poster seemed to solve his problem by replacing the B1S2 twice. It's possible the first one he bought and installed was defective, so he returned it and got another one and things appear to be fine. Before replacing that sensor, I'd at least check the electrical connection at the sensor to ensure it's not cracked or coated with grime, and I'd clean it up with some electronics cleaner spray. If it were me, I'd also just pull the sensor, clean it up, and put it back in to see if that resolved the problem.
Yea, I went ahead and bought a new sensor. Can't go wrong with 50 bucks as opposed to get bullshitted by dealership. While I am at it, I will clean the old and see if it does anything. Will keep you updated.

By the way, what tools will I need to take B2S2 off?
 

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Well, not quite the same problem. The OP had two codes for the same O2 sensor while you have two codes involving two separate sensors--unless the heater circuit code you're getting is P0057 instead of P0037?
Yea, you pointed out correctly. It's P0057 instead of P0037. So both codes indicate the bank 2 side.

So I am gonna replace the B2S2 and see if it does anything. I'll need to do it quick cuz the inspection expires by the end of this month.
 

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What brand did you buy? Beware of cheap O2 sensors as they tend to cause more problems than they solve. If not using OEM, stick with reputable brands such as DENSO or Bosch.

By the way, what tools will I need to take B2S2 off?
Some form of O2 sensor socket/wrench combination that will fit in there. If you don't have one then a deep 22mm socket may do the trick, but you'll have to cut the pigtail off.
 
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