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I am planning on buying a 06 Nissan mUrano, during the first two weeks of July. I have a couple of questions for REAL Murano owners, everytime I go to the dealer they tell me whatever I want to hear and I need some real answers.

Here is what I want to get

Nissan Murano 06 SL, Platinum, Charc Leather, 2WD, Premium Package.

1- How does the Platinum paint hold up against scratches, dings

2- Does the Mo i'm looking at come with the Rear view Cam, if so do all the SL's com with the 7" info screen?

3- How do I get the iPod interface?

4- What should I pay? whats a good dea? (i'm in 33331)

5- Is there anything else I should consider?

6- How is the factory DVD System?

I'm trading in my 03 for explorer sport (paid off) with 30k miles. I owned a maxima and loved it, but had to get rid of it to get wifey out of a bad deal she was in. She now ownes 05 Altima Se. So i'm a Nissan Fan. I was looking at the Pathfinder, but for the same price everyone says Murano. Thanks in advance for your help.
 

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xcel360-

I can answer some of your questions and I am sure other members can provide answers to the rest.

1) I have a Platinum MO and absolutely love the color...as long as it is clean. The durability of the paint appears to be no better or no worse than the rest of Nissan's color choices. I have no door dings or scratches after 10 months, but I believe that is more due to where I park than to the durability of the paint. The paint quality of the MO will be on par with your wife's Altima.

2) All US-bound MOs come with the 7.0" LCD color monitor. All SL and SE models come with the rear view camera.

3) ?

4) A few hundred dollars over invoice is a good deal. At invoice is about the best you can do right now (no incentives). You can find the true dealer invoice data by spending a few dollars at consumerreports.org.

5) AWD, depending on where you travel. I see you live in West Palm Beach, but if you frequently travel to the Northern states in winter then you may want to consider it.

6) Don't know.

Good luck.

-njjoe
 

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When you are ready, I can hook you up with the Internet guy at Maroone Nissan in Delray, where I got mine. They were pretty nice there.

I wouldn't get the factory DVD entertainment system. The screen is a bit small and it is not in 16:9 format, so DVD's will be letterboxed and the picture will be even smaller. Plus, you end up with the old style armrest, which isn't as nice, IMO.

For the price, the aftermarket offers much better solutions.

I would also try to get the Dynamic Control package for the stability control, a very important safety item.

Electronic stability control could prevent nearly one-third of all fatal crashes and reduce rollover risk by as much as 80%; effect is found on single- and multiple-vehicle crashes

ARLINGTON, VA — An extension of antilock brake technology, electronic stability control (ESC) is designed to help drivers retain control of their vehicles during high-speed maneuvers or on slippery roads. Previous research found significant effects of ESC in reducing the risk of fatal single-vehicle crashes. Using data from an additional year of crashes and a larger set of vehicle models, researchers at the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety have updated the 2004 results and found that ESC reduces the risk of fatal multiple-vehicle crashes by 32 percent.

The new research confirms that ESC reduces the risk of all single-vehicle crashes by more than 40 percent — fatal ones by 56 percent. The researchers estimate that if all vehicles were equipped with ESC, as many as 10,000 fatal crashes could be avoided each year.

"The findings indicate that ESC should be standard on all vehicles," says Susan Ferguson, Institute senior vice president for research. "Very few safety technologies show this kind of large effect in reducing crash deaths."

Availability varies: ESC is standard on 40 percent of 2006 passenger vehicle models and optional on another 15 percent. It's standard on every 2006 Audi, BMW, Infiniti, Mercedes, and Porsche. Another 8 vehicle makes (Cadillac, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lexus, Mini, Toyota, Volkswagen, and Volvo) offer at least optional ESC on all of their models. But ESC, standard or optional, is limited to 25 percent or fewer models from Chevrolet, Dodge, Ford, Hummer, Mazda, Mitsubishi, Saturn, Subaru, and Suzuki.

After studies in 2004 by the Institute and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, some manufacturers announced plans to make ESC standard on all SUVs. The percentage of SUV models with standard ESC has been growing faster than for cars.

As a stand-alone option, ESC costs from about $300 to $800, but it can cost more than $2,000 on some models when packaged with other equipment. A potential problem for increasing consumer awareness is that automakers market ESC by various names including Electronic Stability Program, StabiliTrak, or Active Handling.

"When ESC is optional, this hodgepodge of terms is bound to be confusing," Ferguson points out. "It's good that some of the major manufacturers have pledged to make ESC standard on their SUVs in the next few model years, and it should be standard on cars and pickup trucks too."

How ESC works: Antilock brakes have speed sensors and independent braking capability. ESC adds sensors that continuously monitor how well a vehicle is responding to a driver's steering wheel input. These sensors can detect when a driver is about to lose control because the vehicle is straying from the intended line of travel — a problem that usually occurs in high-speed maneuvers or on slippery roads. In these circumstances, ESC brakes individual wheels automatically to keep the vehicle under control.

When a driver makes a sudden emergency maneuver or, for example, enters a curve too fast, the vehicle may spin out of control. Then ESC's automatic braking is applied and in some cases throttle reduced to help keep the vehicle under control.

ESC is relatively new. Only in the last few years have researchers had sufficient data to analyze its effects on real-world crashes. The new Institute study is based on data from the federal Fatality Analysis Reporting System and police reports of crashes in 10 states during 2001-04. Researchers compared crash rates for cars and SUVs without ESC and the same models in subsequent years when ESC was standard (note: some vehicles with optional ESC were included in the no-ESC group because so few buyers choose this option).

More effects of ESC on SUVs: The data in the Institute's 2004 study weren't extensive enough to allow researchers to compute separate risk reduction estimates for cars and SUVs. However, this was possible in the broader analysis that's just completed. While both cars and SUVs benefit from ESC, the reduction in the risk of single-vehicle crashes was significantly greater for SUVs — 49 percent versus 33 percent for cars. The reduction in fatal single-vehicle crashes wasn't significantly different for SUVs (59 percent) than for cars (53 percent).

Many single-vehicle crashes involve rolling over, and ESC effectiveness in preventing rollovers is even more dramatic. It reduces the risk of fatal single-vehicle rollovers of SUVs by 80 percent, 77 percent for cars.

ESC was found to reduce the risk of all kinds of fatal crashes by 43 percent. This is more than the 34 percent reduction reported in 2004. If all vehicles had ESC, it could prevent as many as 10,000 of the 34,000 fatal passenger vehicle crashes that occur each year.

Insurance claims show effects on collision losses: The results of the Institute's studies showing significant reductions in serious crash risk are reflected in some insurance losses. According to a new analysis by the Highway Loss Data Institute, an affiliate of the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety, losses under collision coverage are about 15 percent lower for vehicles with ESC than for predecessor models without it. However, ESC doesn't have much effect on property damage liability claims or the frequency of injury claims. These findings track police-reported crashes, which show little effect of ESC on the risk of low-severity multiple-vehicle crashes.
 

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xcel360 said:

4- What should I pay? whats a good dea? (i'm in 33331)

.

Is $33331 your drive out price before or after TTL? I got the same vehicle except it had Touring pkg and splash guards for $31,026 (+TTL) ($400 below invoice) for somewhere around $33500 drive out.

Anyhow, this was in Texas. My advice is to figure out exactly what you want (Edmunds, Consumer Reports, etc) and go through the Internet department of several dealers to get the best price.
 

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I'm not convinced that the internet is the best way to buy a car. In the past I have hardly ever been quoted a good price online. I took a chance this time and received a price that was about $700 over invoice, I walked in at a different Nissan dealer on my way to the one who quoted me and bought the exact same vehicle for $300 over invoice.
 

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TimBob said:
I'm not convinced that the internet is the best way to buy a car. In the past I have hardly ever been quoted a good price online. I took a chance this time and received a price that was about $700 over invoice, I walked in at a different Nissan dealer on my way to the one who quoted me and bought the exact same vehicle for $300 over invoice.

Really? I got a varied range from $400 above to what I got. Some weren't willing to deal, some were. I sent request for quotes to at least 5 dealerships. Last quote came in with the $400 under and I ran with it. Can't hurt to try anyhow... :)
 

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Keep in mind that the invoice amount is not the actual cost of the vehicle. Don't be fooled by what the salesman tells you. Sure they'll be glad to show you the invoice, but that's not what they actually paid. From what I understand, dealerships get dealer rebates. Compare it to this:

Say you buy a computer for $1,000 and it has a mail-in-rebate for $200. Your invoice will show that you paid $1,000 but it actually cost you $800.

The same goes for cars.

Another point i'd like to make is something called factory holdback. This is about 3% of the cost that is returned to the dealer when the car is sold.

The offer you should make to the salesman is the actual cost of the vehicle plus 5%.

I hope this helps you out a bit. I'd suggest that you buy your MO the last week of the month when dealerships have to meet quota's.

Contact me if you have anymore questions.

I am planning on buying another MO to replace my totalled MO this week. Good luck to you. I hate car salesmen and the whole car buying process it makes me sick.
 

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princymisy said:
Keep in mind that the invoice amount is not the actual cost of the vehicle. Don't be fooled by what the salesman tells you. Sure they'll be glad to show you the invoice, but that's not what they actually paid. From what I understand, dealerships get dealer rebates. Compare it to this:

Say you buy a computer for $1,000 and it has a mail-in-rebate for $200. Your invoice will show that you paid $1,000 but it actually cost you $800.

The same goes for cars.

Another point i'd like to make is something called factory holdback. This is about 3% of the cost that is returned to the dealer when the car is sold.

The offer you should make to the salesman is the actual cost of the vehicle plus 5%.

I hope this helps you out a bit. I'd suggest that you buy your MO the last week of the month when dealerships have to meet quota's.

Contact me if you have anymore questions.

I am planning on buying another MO to replace my totalled MO this week. Good luck to you. I hate car salesmen and the whole car buying process it makes me sick.
Hi Princymisy

Again for my purchase I did the internet thing.. (knew exactly what I wanted, submitted requests for quote... blah blah.. :) )

Anywho, for my Mo if I did cost plus 5 percent I would have paid something like $32415 (with more options (touring,etc) than original poster). But I paid $31326 (see below). If I calculate the cost (invoice less the 3 percent holdback - appeared no rebates available) this would be $30872. Let me know if I left money on the table somewhere (or at least I can't do math..) . I do know the dealer made a small profit but that didn’t bother me. Thought I got a good deal.. erf!!!

(ps I misquoted in earlier post - said $31026, was $31326 - sorry!)

My deal:


2006 MURANO SL FWD SUV AUTO

K21-G
PLATINUM, CHARCOAL


Invoice MSRP
BASE $26,807 $29,150

CGO $59 $80
CARGO AREA PROTEC

FLO $68 $90
FLOOR MATS

RRC $146 $190
ROOF RAILS CROSSB

SGD $90 $120
SPLASH GUARDS

TR4 $3,990 $4,600
SL TOURING PKG

WDF $61 $90
SUNROOF WIND DEFL

50S $0 $0
50 STATE EMISSION

Freight Charge $605 $605


Total $31,826 $34,925


I will sell the Murano for $31,326
 
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