Nissan Murano Forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This excact problem happened to me on my new 2 day old Murano in another city with less than 300 miles on it!!!!! Fortunately my dealer was awesome in helping me with my problem. ( I called him at home on a Sunday afternoon. )His response was above and beyond...he even paid for a rental car for me and the tow truck. I took the info I gained from this web site to them..it was very helpful to me. Thanks
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
7,136 Posts
The cause of the alternator failure has been determined to be wire fatigue due to rapid engine speed changes. How can a car with only 300 miles experience so many "rapid engine speed changes" to cause wire fatigue??? I think the real reason for alternator failure is something else.....:confused:

Oh...welcome to the board....:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
zebelkhan said:
The cause of the alternator failure has been determined to be wire fatigue due to rapid engine speed changes. How can a car with only 300 miles experience so many "rapid engine speed changes" to cause wire fatigue??? I think the real reason for alternator failure is something else

I have wondered about this same thing ever since the recall notice was posted. Manual transmission cars, especially those driven in a sporting fashion, such as "blipping" the throttle on heel-and-toe downshifts, will have more "rapid engine speed changes," than will a CVT Murano. So if the same alternator is used on 350Zs, G35 coupes, etc., then why haven't they been failing in those applications?

Oh, well, at least they're being replaced on Muranos.
 

·
Mr. 3 K, 3/3/5. 5K,10/5/7
Joined
·
4,994 Posts
Just my opinion

Many Many posts ago. When I moved from th 04 to 05 ( my 05 number is outside of the recall series) I determined that I had a different part number that other alternators.

I also felt that the alternator was turning slower on average than the alt on the same engine does without CVT. ( I had the same engine on my G35)

I felt the average lower RPM's and the MO's high amperage requirements resulted in the drive transistors having to increase the average current in the field winding of the alternator to cause the alternator to produce higher outputs.

Finally the alternator was actually too small for this combination of situations.

Result battery charge average is low and further stressed the alternator.

Add in the location of the alternator producing low air flow cooling thru the windings.

All these combines to create high temperature field windings that are then more susceptible to failing.

"Fatigue" Not really IMO. Your MO's battery was probably low from sitting and needed charging. So the alternator had to do still extra duty.

I think some folks have escaped failure by their combination of low current usage, Higher "Average" RPM's, etc.

I posted an expanded version of this explaination is somewhere posted on the forum at least 6 months ago if anyone want to search for it.

This is just MO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
Kpetta said:
This excact problem happened to me on my new 2 day old Murano in another city with less than 300 miles on it!!!!!
Please correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't Nissan dealers supposed to install the revised alternators before they sell a new vehicle?

(quote from a previous post)
****** Dealer Inventory *****
Federal law requires that new vehicles in dealer inventory which are the subject of a
safety recall must be corrected prior to delivery under a sale or lease. Failure to do
so can result in civil penalties by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
(NHTSA).
Note: Vehicles produced after 9/24/04 are not affected by this campaign. Our
records indicate that fewer than 900 vehicles affected by this campaign remain in
dealer inventory.
Effective July 15, please use Service Comm (P5215) to determine which 2005
Murano vehicles, if any, in your inventory may require this campaign repair prior to
being retailed.
RichE :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
545 Posts
My VIN is on the list. How long before I get a recall notice or will the dealer contact me to have the work done?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
Re: Just my opinion

GripperDon said:

I also felt that the alternator was turning slower on average than the alt on the same engine does without CVT. ( I had the same engine on my G35)

I felt the average lower RPM's and the MO's high amperage requirements resulted in the drive transistors having to increase the average current in the field winding of the alternator to cause the alternator to produce higher outputs.

Finally the alternator was actually too small for this combination of situations.

Result battery charge average is low and further stressed the alternator.

Add in the location of the alternator producing low air flow cooling thru the windings.

All these combines to create high temperature field windings that are then more susceptible to failing.

"Fatigue" Not really IMO.
This is just MO.
Thanks, Grip. That all makes sense. The explanation of "rapid engine speed changes due to CVT" never made sense to me as a reason for alternator failures.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top