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Discussion Starter #1
Why didn't they put a drain hole in the fuel fill area? For some reason when I fill the tank, if I try to put just 10cents more fuel (I like round numbers) in after the handle clicks off there is always a rather large splash of fuel that comes back out the filler neck and without a drain (a la 'Benz) the gas only has one place to go and it's straight down the freshly washed paint. I usually find myself caught with an empty tank before filling (haven't figured out why yet, guess I got used to a 42 gal tank in the Suburban.) Anyone else experiencing this gas bath?
 

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midnitexpress

I just filled up on Sunday and eralized that when the pump clicks off, the Mo is full. Usually on other cars you can squeeze another 50 cents in it or more. Luckily I have not had it spill over on me but I have been close.
 

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It is best not to top off the tank after the pump clicks off. Overflowing the tank can flood the charcoal cannister, leading to a check engine light! If you want details about this, check out www.texascardoctor.com (a great radio show by the way).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I try not to top off, but have been noticing that when the handle clicks off, then that's it! After years or squeezing that extra bit after click off, it's difficult to break that habit. Of course, some stations are different but for the most part, the same happens at all the pumps.
 

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i've only filled the tank twice in my MO so far and each time the gas attendant topped it if i guess you can say.. and i never had any over spill.. so i dont think when it clicks that means its full.. unless my tank just had a little more to go to be topped off but didnt quite reach it yet...
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I'm going to try to take notes qas to when it happens. If memory serves, it might only happen when filling from a "light on" empty tank
 

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Noticed the same. I fill my tank on each refueling and when the pump clicks it full.
 

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Ditto. One click = full. Tried a couple of times to squeeze in a bit more, but the splash minimizing design means that with the click, its definitely full. Eric L. makes a good point about not trying to get more in due to overfill. You can flood the charcoal canister with gas and cause the MIL to illuminate. The charcoal canister is designed to absorb gas fumes and limit evaporative emissions. One of the reasons that a running Mo emits LESS than a car from the 1950's with its engine off! Also, this helps the Mo meet the more stringent California vehicle emissions requirements. You can be proud of the fact that our little 245hp machines are some of the cleanest vehicles (cars OR trucks) out there!
 

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Re: midnitexpress

pcs15394 said:
Usually on other cars you can squeeze another 50 cents in it or more.
I remember the days of Esso putting a tiger in the tank, but I never thought about putting 50 Cent in there. I wonder how he'd feel about it? (Sorry, bad Rap Artist joke...)

I've seen the same thing. Full means full. But most guys are used to trying to get in just a little more... I've learned.:)
 

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just for kicks, what's the most gas you ever put in the car during a fill up. I have had to put something like 20.1 gallons to fill it. I think the computer read *** by the time I got to the gas station..
 

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Most ever for me was 20.973 on 10/4/2003 with 6,094 miles on the odometer. It was 89 Octane at 1.66 per gallon. My average fill up for 2003 was 18.045 on the first 9,118 miles. I was shocked that I could get that much in there and still drive to the pump. I must have literally been on fumes.

(I keep very accurate gas mileage records for tax purposes.)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm a Chevron guy. Premium. Have used in all cars for 6 years now.
 

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Mine just clicks off the pump when full, and it is full. I think it is more of a pump problem than a fueling area problem with back splash.
:confused:
 

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I bet it runs nice on Aviation fuel...;)
 

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Hmmm maybe I should try Aviation Fuel.... 100 LL.... might not do well in the converter though. I did put some 100 LL in my lawn mower once... :eek:
 

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Aviation Fuel has a very high sulfur content that acts like a blowtorch in the cylinders. If you used it you would melt your mo. Better to use race gas.
 

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I'm shocked at how many of you can't get another drop in after it clicks off! I'm always able to squeeze another 25-50 cents in, and once was able to squeeze in over a dollar! without spills! When I'm taking long trips (greetings from Sunny Debary Florida, btw) I always fill it up as much as I can to minimize gas stops.

After it clicks itself off, listen and you can hear the bubbles popping and the gas draining down into the tank. It takes a very light touch, but seriously, I can get another quarter to half-dollar each time. Just wait for the gurgling to end. That extra half-gallon could translate into 10 miles you need at the end when you're looking for gas in the Georgia backcountry.

The scariest event was back when I still had the Xterra, and a pump near Quantico, VA didn't have the fill detector. I was standing a good distance to the rear of the car, when all of a sudden gasoline came SHOOTING out of the gas tank.. like a fountain all over the side of the car, the pump, the island, everything! I removed the hose and more just kept shooting out of the tank for a few more seconds. I replaced the hose in the pump, ran to the driver's side, turned the car to On without starting it, put the car in Neutral and pushed the car away from the pump. Got it up to a good roll and a good distance away, jumped in, started it and gunned it outta there. Gas was just pouring along the ground out of the station. Gave me a freaking heart attack! I watched in the rear view mirror for a fireball but it never happened. Sheesh.

Oh, Exxon/Mobil Super for me as much as humanly possible. I also have the speedpass in the window and on my keychain, so the pumps are often ready to go before I get out of the driver's seat. Something that comes in handy in our cold Northeastern winters. Jump out, fill it up, replace the hose, replace the cap, close the door, spin around to grab the receipt, jump in the car and GO!
 

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Himself said:
Aviation Fuel has a very high sulfur content that acts like a blowtorch in the cylinders. If you used it you would melt your mo. Better to use race gas.
Cool, learn something new everyday!

I used it once about 25 years ago in my Kawasaki triple two stroke and it was smooth as silk and very fast.

Guess I won't be doing that anytime soon.

Hmmm... I wonder how the catalytic converter would like it...:rolleyes:
 

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You can use leaded fuel, with the following caveats:
- leaded fuel will quickly destroy the catalytic converter.
- leaded fuel will damage and eventually destroy the oxygen sensor.

Leaded gasoline also leave white deposits on the O2 sensor and housing; some mechanics may recognize this as being from leaded gas, and deny your warranty for a new oxygen sensor.

Despite these drawbacks, many people (especially hard-core racers) run leaded racing fuel with no major problems. Indeed, the popular racing gasolines (such as VP Fuels C-16) provide a very significant performance boost to those running high boost levels on their engines. Similar effects can be had with unleaded racing gasolines, however.

Aviation gas is a slightly different story. Aviation gasoline can be used, but it was never formulated for high-compression turbocharged racing applications. The octane rating is higher, to be sure, but octane is only one of many characteristics of gasoline. Some in the gasoline industry have recommended against using aviation gas, as the burn rate is different from that normally used in automotive gasolines.

The most popular AVgas is 100LL (100 octane low-lead mix), which nevertheless still contains at least as much, and possibly more, lead as normal leaded automotive gasoline. The "low-lead" rating is in comparison to other aviation fuels; this amount of lead WILL wreck the above mentioned auto components.
I was thinking of jet fuel when I mentioned sulfur content. Sorry I wasn't more clear.
 
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