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I don't think you should let a brake job be your first project as a weekend mechanic. The job is more than replacing the pads and rotors. It also includes inspection of the calipers and other components so you will have to have a good understanding of them. However, the job is simple enough. I do recommend reading up on safety, using a proper floor jack and how to support your MO on a it, etc, etc.

As posters above have mentioned, at that mileage I doubt your rotors are thin enough to require replacement so if you don't feel brake pedal pulsing when you brake, you don't need to worry about the rotors.

You can check the condition of the brake pads by taking the wheel off and looking at them. If you have less than 2 or 3 millimeters left in thickness then replace them in sets. Good luck!
 

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I agree - this is not the place to start your mechanical efforts. If you don't know how to check the pads for wear, you're not ready to do this job. Start with less safety-critical work, and do your homework online. There are tutorials and references to help you learn the basics.

Also - if you have a friend who is a good mechanic, ask him to help you and show you the ropes.
 

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Thank you very much for the instructions, I take my 06 Murano to the dealership for oil changes and sometimes tire rotation when I get coupons. Last time I went the mechanic told me that my pads were ready to be changed.

I read this thread probably 50 times to familiarize myself with the procedure and purchased new front pads (Akebono ProACT), I also bought the supplies that I needed (caliper lube, brakleen, c-clamp). I followed the instructions except for the brake fluid flush, I will either attempt this when I change the rear pads or just have it done at the local garage.

I have a question though, I think I may have put a bit too much anti-squeal goo between the pad and shim since I saw a big protruding glop of the goo after testing out the pads. Is this bad? I did not see a mess anywhere, just a slightly large drop
 

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I think this means you used the correct amount of goo - it should seep out. As long as it doesn't make a huge mess on other surfaces, just leave it there - it will harden to a soft and non sticky material.

Thank you very much for the instructions, I take my 06 Murano to the dealership for oil changes and sometimes tire rotation when I get coupons. Last time I went the mechanic told me that my pads were ready to be changed.

I read this thread probably 50 times to familiarize myself with the procedure and purchased new front pads (Akebono ProACT), I also bought the supplies that I needed (caliper lube, brakleen, c-clamp). I followed the instructions except for the brake fluid flush, I will either attempt this when I change the rear pads or just have it done at the local garage.

I have a question though, I think I may have put a bit too much anti-squeal goo between the pad and shim since I saw a big protruding glop of the goo after testing out the pads. Is this bad? I did not see a mess anywhere, just a slightly large drop
 

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I think this means you used the correct amount of goo - it should seep out. As long as it doesn't make a huge mess on other surfaces, just leave it there - it will harden to a soft and non sticky material.
Ok cool, thank you very much for the write-up. This was my first time working on brakes and I learned a lot by reading this thread and doing the job myself.

Edit: I have another question, the service manual shows that the brake pads come with a shim and a shim cover. The akebono ProAct pads i purchased only came with shims, no shim cover, when I did my front brakes I cleaned and reused the shim covers but didn't do so with the rears. How important are the shim covers?
 

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HI guys and thx for this awesome tutorial ,I was just wondering if I can apply this method of repair to my 2010 AWD Mo,Mine is no where near ready for new pads but I will tackle this repair my self:29:
 

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Great tutorial. I've changed brakes on other cars. Glad to see its not much different on this. Anyone ever deal with tirerack rotors? Such a heavy car, I think it needs better rotors to begin with.
 

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After doing our annual smog check the indy shop noticed that my driver side rear pads is thicker than the passenger side rear. So I checked it myself a couple of days ago and it was indeed thicker than the right side.approx.--60%--20% Since its been 4 years and about 35K ago with about 20% left on the thinnest inside pads passeneger side, I decided to get my free pad replacement from AZ.

I am worried that the driver side caliper is not engaging properly --reason for the thicker pads. Before putting in the new pads, I checked its movement first by lifting the rear end and spinning each wheel while my wife hits the brakes. Both left and right side engages and releases each time- did it several times - even tried to force spin it while she steps on the brakes to see if it still turns a little - it does not. I know I lubricated all 4 sliding pins when I changed the rear pads then. Removing the wheels and the loosening the top pin I checked the caliper movement (pushing it by hand) and its smooth- slides good meaning pins are lubed properly. My suspicion is that my driver side caliper piston mybe acting up at times-randomly and not engaging. But as I test it, it seems to work ok. I kinda veer to suspect the driver side caliper being the faulty one because the passenger side seems to wear on schedule as the first oem set of pads was. So for now I decided to just change the pads and lube the pins again and observe it closely for the next year. As I test drive and bed the new pads, I did not notice any pull when brakes was applied either forward or back. So it seems to be evenly braking on all 4s and no locking/seizing.

I am thinking of maybe getting those caliper overhaul kits (those that replaces the square gasket inside the piston and the dust boot on the outside) later on if symptoms persist. Seems like the square gasket is the life of the piston. What makes it retract back and move forward as brakes are applied while sealing it.

Next inspection would be when I change the front pads within a year or 10K or less. I will probably bleed the fluid again by then and see how the rear pads wears out.
 

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I value my life too much to ever do my own brake job. I don't want a mechanic trying to do my job, and no way I'm going to try to do his. He's a professional, I'll pay for that expertise.
 

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I feel differently. I know that mechanics are proficient and know how to do a solid brake job, but I'm also proficient. Add to that the fact that I'm not working on the clock and can take as much time as I want to double-check my work, and I feel pretty darn good about doing my own brake work.

If I had no clue how to do it, I'd either learn (which is what I did years ago) or take it to a shop (which I didn't want to pay for, so I learned how to do it.) In fact, the basics of brake work are very easy.

I probably save a couple of thousand dollars a year by doing my own car work. As time goes by, demands on my time increase and I get older, I find that my income has increased so I have shops do some things I don't care to tackle.
 

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I just did the brakes on my pontuac and it was real easy...

So now Im wondering about replacing brakes on my 2009 murano..

My rear brakes were done at 65000 miles. My front brakes are still original at 73000 miles.. so I wouldnt mind replacing my front brakes.

The thread doesnt talk about replacing rotors.. if they are relativly cheap then why not put new ones on? The pads on my pontiac had the shims already installed, so im not sure what you guys are talking about shims and covers. Why do you need antisqueel greese on the back of a pad?
Do the pistons push back in or do they need to be turned back in..
 

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I just did the brakes on my pontuac and it was real easy...

So now Im wondering about replacing brakes on my 2009 murano..

My rear brakes were done at 65000 miles. My front brakes are still original at 73000 miles.. so I wouldnt mind replacing my front brakes.

The thread doesnt talk about replacing rotors.. if they are relativly cheap then why not put new ones on? The pads on my pontiac had the shims already installed, so im not sure what you guys are talking about shims and covers. Why do you need antisqueel greese on the back of a pad?
Do the pistons push back in or do they need to be turned back in..
I've done the brakes on every car I've ever owned (and I'm in my 60's, so there have been a `few' cars), and the Murano was the easiest I've ever done. I too did all 4 wheels at 65K, costing me $50. At that low mileage, the rotors and calipers were fine, and I didn't even bleed the brakes then. At 105K, I did all 4 wheels again, just because the car was up in the air in my driveway getting an oil change and tire rotation. Oh yeah, and because changing the pads is SO easy and this time cost me zero (with the AutoZone warranty). I DID bleed the brakes this time, mainly to get fresh brake fluid into the system. Again, the rotors were fine. No matter how much or little rotors cost, there is no need to replace them if they aren't scored or warped.

I've always found OEM shims/covers to be optional, but always try to reuse them if they aren't badly rusted. A good quality anti-squeal grease is a MUST, however, to minimize brake squeal (which I've never had on my MO in the 10 years I've owned it).

And the Mo caliper pistons merely push in on all 4 wheels - no need to turn them. I use a C-clamp to push them in (make sure you check your fluid reservoir level while doing this).

Good luck!
 

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thanks, I'll have to give it a shot. I'm still not convinced that I don't need to replace the rotors... I'll have to check them to see if they have any score marks. I know they are not warped because I don't feel any vibrations..
 

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I'm still not convinced that I don't need to replace the rotors
If your rotors aren't warped (ie no pulsing when brakes are applied) and the pads have never been worn down to the metal backing, there is no reason to replace them. I do know that some car makers (ie BMW) recommend replacing rotors every time the pads are changed, but I've never found this to be the case with the nissans I've owned - especially at only 73K miles.
 

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If your rotors aren't warped (ie no pulsing when brakes are applied) and the pads have never been worn down to the metal backing, there is no reason to replace them. I do know that some car makers (ie BMW) recommend replacing rotors every time the pads are changed, but I've never found this to be the case with the nissans I've owned - especially at only 73K miles.
Ok gyys.. I guess all I can is try changing just the pads..
 

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thanks, I'll have to give it a shot. I'm still not convinced that I don't need to replace the rotors... I'll have to check them to see if they have any score marks. I know they are not warped because I don't feel any vibrations..
There should be a minimum rotor width cast into the edge of the rotor. If not, you can look it up. Use a pair of calipers or other accurate measuring tool to check thickness. If the thickness (front to back) still exceeds the minimum AND you do not have any brake pulsing or evidence of warpage, there is no need to replace the rotors. In that case I like to scuff up the surfaces with 100 grit sandpaper before installing new pads.
 

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I value my life too much to ever do my own brake job. I don't want a mechanic trying to do my job, and no way I'm going to try to do his. He's a professional, I'll pay for that expertise.
With the nonsense you post here I wouldn't want you doing brakes either.

The majority of people are fine doing simple maintenance work like brakes. Short of forgetting to tighten something it's pretty hard to mess up a disc brake system brake job. The parts only fit one way and even if you're doing pads and rotors it's 4 bolts per wheel. The only tough part is sometimes rotors get seized onto the hub and novices get scared to use enough force to break them loose.
 

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With the nonsense you post here I wouldn't want you doing brakes either.

The majority of people are fine doing simple maintenance work like brakes. Short of forgetting to tighten something it's pretty hard to mess up a disc brake system brake job. The parts only fit one way and even if you're doing pads and rotors it's 4 bolts per wheel. The only tough part is sometimes rotors get seized onto the hub and novices get scared to use enough force to break them loose.
If you had asked me last week about doing brakes, I would of said no way no how.... but after doing them on my other car its like changing a light bulb.. I am actually looking forward to doing them again. My only real reservation is would I recognize if I had a problem with a caliper/piston?

I looked closer at my front brakes and I think there is still plenty of pad left.. How is it that front brakes can last 75,000 miles on these cars?
 
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