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The alternator on my 2006 Nissan Murano crapped out so I thought it would be a good idea to change it out myself. I've never done anything except change my oil and breaks so this is new territory for me. I've done all I can to take the car apart to access the alternator buried under the engine behind the front passenger wheel well. But I'm having a hell of a time trying to remove these three nuts. As you can see, I already had a fight with the idler pulley nut. Stripped it bad and had to chisel and saw the damn thing off over 6 hours in the 115 AZ heat. Now I need to get the 14 mm alternator nut off and the two pulley nuts for a replacement.
HOW? I'm terrified of stripping another nut but these won't budge. According to the instructions and specs I found that alt nut is on there with 62 pounds of torque! Ugh. Total PITA. I've soaked them in PB Blaster for the last day, and tried to nudge them to no avail with my 6 sided ratchets. But from underneath the car I can't get enough leverage in the cramped space to do anything of use.
What can a DIYer do to get them off?
 

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I moved this post here.

I'm glad to hear you have six-point sockets, as they're much less likely to round off a nut when it's tight. There is no photo, so I don't understand the " as you can see."

Sometimes the solution is to add extensions to back away from a nut and get a better angle of attack. Sometimes you need a closed box end wrench to break a nut free. 62 lbs/ft isn't super tight, but it's enough that you need some grunt on the effort to free it by hand.

I haven't done this one, but hopefully with the new thread someone who has done this will see it and respond.
 

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It's up to you, but if you have to use an impact wrench on a part this size, you'll probably break off the nut or stud. I'd stay with end wrenches or sockets and try to find some combination of extensions and universal joints that will allow access.

I'm comfortable using impact wrenches on large diameter bolts like suspension and lug nuts, but on smaller parts an air wrench or electric wrench that operates at lower torque levels is safer.
 

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It's still all about using the right tool for the job. For smaller bolts I start with my battery powered 1/4" ~100 ft lb impact driver, then step up to my battery powered 1/2" 300 ft lb impact wrench if needed. I also just pulse it at first to break the rust bond while also making sure it's seated securely on the bolt before I lay into it with full power.

For tougher and larger bolts I'm going to add a 1100 ft lb electric impact wrench to my toolbox.

I think the way an "appropriate power for the job" impact wrench loosens a bolt by its vibration/pulses is sometimes superior for breaking free rusty bolts compared to using a lot of leverage, especially when trying to keep long handle securely seated on the bolt at a distance/angle...

Prior to using an impact wrench I used leverage along with banging the handle with a rubber mallet to free larger bolts. However, there isn't always enough space to swing the mallet...
 
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