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I truly hate beeing the prty pooper, the idea is great no doubt about that but I have to say that what you are doing to the lines is lethal in the long run. The material that was used looks rather spongy and absorbant. Also in general if moisture gets underneath this material it will rust and corrode the lines especially in areas like here in canada with the tonnes of salt they put on the roads
Ladies and gents, I am a corrosion engineer by profession, and this is absolutely true. We see this type of corrosion all the time on above ground pipes that have been insulated around plants and compressor stations. Moisture accumulates and condenses under the wrap and sets up the ideal corrosion cell. Failure in some cases is quite rapid.

Given the heating/cooling effect in the engine compartment, I wouldn't take my chances wrapping stuff like this without giving the lines a good coating of something like high heat epoxy, and even then I'd be very skeptical.
 

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Ladies and gents, I am a corrosion engineer by profession, and this is absolutely true. We see this type of corrosion all the time on above ground pipes that have been insulated around plants and compressor stations. Moisture accumulates and condenses under the wrap and sets up the ideal corrosion cell. Failure in some cases is quite rapid.

Given the heating/cooling effect in the engine compartment, I wouldn't take my chances wrapping stuff like this without giving the lines a good coating of something like high heat epoxy, and even then I'd be very skeptical.
so then what would you recommend instead of doing this?


Sent from my Autoguide iPad app
 

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Refrigerant tubing on home AC units are routinely encased in closed-cell foam insulation and never have I heard of those lines failing due to corrosion.

-njjoe
 

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They corrode, as well, but they aren't under the adverse heating/cooling that occurs under the hood of a vehicle. So the corrosion rate is much slower.
 

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I read this thread with great interest, and I would like to thank the OP and all who have contributed their knowledge, insight, and experience on this topic.

My wife and I have a pair of silver 2004 Murano SLs, and we live in central Texas. Needless to say the summers are long and hot. I noticed the Murano AC works very well after the sun goes down even though the ambient air temp was still over 100 degrees F. I decided to approach the non stellar AC performance in both of my Muranos from the standpoint of keeping the heat out of the cabin instead of trying to get the AC air a few degrees cooler from the vents.

Murano, Italy is known for it's glass, and looking at the rather large amounts of graceful glass on the vehicle it is easy to imagine how Nissan may have decided to name them.

I looked into heat reflecting window tinting from a local automotive window tint shop. I had them install Madico Onyx window film first on my Murano so we could compare its performance to my wife's factory tinted glass. Her Murano has the light brown leather interior and mine is black leather. Her Murano was warm, but mine was down right hot before the tint was applied.

After the tint was applied to my Murano, it was dramatically cooler than her Murano in a side by side comparison. I am now actually able to be comfortable in triple digit heat in the middle of the day even with the fan set to mid speed with a black leather interior. Don't forget to have them tint the moon roof too!! We were so impressed with the difference, we had her windows tinted the next day.

Not all window tints are able to reflect heat, and the color of the tint has very little to do with its ability to reflect heat. As always, do your own research, but we are very happy with the results.
 

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Someone earlier mentioned wanting to know whether or not this is still the case in the newer muranos. My dealer gave me a 2013 MO as a loaner and checking under the hood and the configuration has changed. Things were moved around to be more spacious and the AC line that used to be right next to the engine has been moved further away. Just my 2 cents.
 

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Discussion Starter #109
With all the talk of corrosion, I opened this thread in summer of 2009. 3 years and over 130K on the clock, my AC system is still performing like a champ. In other makes/models I've seen over the years, no corrosion issues with OEM insulation.

I used industrial grade AC line insulation from a residential HVAC store. So far it seems to be holding nice and tight. It's slipped a bit from the zip ties on the end, but it's still doing its job of keeping engine heat away from the lines.
 

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Colder A/C

Well I had some issues with my A/C in the Texas 100 degree heat. 60 degrees felt like 80. I stopped at the Local Autozone and picked up a can of A/C Pro recharge in a can...I was skeptical at first but after a couple of days the A/C was much colder. I used a 18oz. can and a smaller one. It was the easiest fix cost my about $100.00 bucks....Now my A/C is blowing cold air.:29:

check it out:
Do-It-Yourself AC Repair, Car Air Conditioning Refrigerant, R134a Freon
 

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Discussion Starter #111
Yea...I'd hope that adding freon to a low AC system would help make your AC colder. ;)

LOL...
 

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Thanks for all you effort in posting this information Warhammer, much appreciated! Cheers.
 

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Hi, Does anyone have a video of how to remove the Cross brace?

Thank you.

And what if its done without removing the cross brace?
If your AC does not feel so cold, I would check the refrigerant level first to see if its low. In my case after doing the insulation wrap there was no improvement. After I added refrigerant into my AC system, which turn up to be a little low with AC gauges reading, it greatly improved and its been blowing 42-40 deg on our hot Vegas heat of 110 deg F since. On older cars you can losing some refrigerant due to older seals and gaskets.
 

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If your AC does not feel so cold, I would check the refrigerant level first to see if its low. In my case after doing the insulation wrap there was no improvement. After I added refrigerant into my AC system, which turn up to be a little low with AC gauges reading, it greatly improved and its been blowing 42-40 deg on our hot Vegas heat of 110 deg F since. On older cars you can losing some refrigerant due to older seals and gaskets.
Hi, i had it checked by a mechanic, he said compressor is not good. so it needs replaced. But i was like why. what does it have to do with being colder. so i tried not to risk it changing it first, compressor might be expensive and also fake too
 

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Scotty Kilmer has an excellent series of entertaining automotive videos.

He mentions that AC compressors are designed to leak a little refrigerant in order to lubricate the compressor shaft seal, makes sense. He also mentions that if the AC is not used often it can leak more due to the seal drying out...

Here's one of his video focusing on AC. He mentions the compressor shaft seal around 4:50.

 
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