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Well I was looking to trade in my wifes Trailblazer, which didn't hold its value at all, on a new car for me and give the MO to. I was looking to get a Passat TDI wagon as I am driving 20,000 + miles per year and the 40 + MPG is very appealling. After finding out I am stuck with the Blazer I comtemplated Trading in the MO. Mine is loaded (Sticker was $37,500) with 35,000 miles and they said the trade in value is only in the low 20's. Seems pretty bad for a car as nice as the MO to be depriciating so quickly given its high Consumer Reports marks.

So now I may be looking into just purchasing a used car to put some miles on since the MO is on a Smart Buy.
 

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It is very common for a new car to lose a lot of its value as soon as it leaves the dealer lot. That is why a one year old used car (that has not been a rental) can be a much better purchase than a brand new one. However, a "trade in" value is not really the best way to determine the true value of your MO either. Look at the price of MOs with similar conditions in the local papers and find out how much they are going for in your area.
 

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Low 20's doesn't sound all that bad for an '03. Your purchase price seems a bit on the high side so I'm not sure you should use that as a baseline. Our '05SE is missing the technology package and that's about it. We paid $34k including TTL.
 

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With the amount of interest rate cuts the Fed had to make to get the economy on the road to recovery after 9/11, the New Car industry led the way in producing wealth to start replacing the 4 to 9 trillion dollars that evaporated out of the economy due to the wall street reaction.

With new car financing at 0% to 4% in a market that was geared for 10% to 15% in order to keep used cars makketable, the balance was destroyed when the amount of used cars traded in on new ones made them virtually worthless. Dealerships started resorting to giving a trade-in value equal to what the vehicle would bring at the auction. This price is well below retail, loan, average trade-in or any price that had been used as a pre-determined starting point in past car buying negotiations.

Until the Fed gets interest rates back up north of at least 5%, there will still be more of an incentive to purchase new rather than used, used cars will continue to flood the market, and the depreciation of relatively new cars will continue to achieve higher record percentages than ever witnessed before.

With the Fed rate hovering around 1% for as long as it did, there were new ways created to hide the inflation from the public. The most used one was trade inbalances, where inflation was exported as payment for goods and services from overseas (can anyone say outsourcing?)

This trend is far from over. The question is, will there ever be a future value of any commodity while inflation has erroded the buying power of our paychecks beyound the point that any major purchase could be made with out benefit of financing. With this becoming the norm, the future value of anything becomes more of a moot point, when the whole of the public is totally dependent on financial float for any purchase, and are forced to comply with a entirely credit-run economy and money system.

Until no-one is still paying pre 2001 interest rates for what they are driving, there will stilll be more incentive to buy new at lower interest rates than to continue to drive old. It will still be years before used cars hold any appreciable portion of the trade in value that was hyped at point of purchase - if ever.

I am waiting for the ones to come out with out a gas cap. You buy it, drive it until the first tank goes dry, recyle it for junk, then take your recycle coupon for it's carcass to the dealership for a downpayment on a new one. They have already achieved this degree of advanced thinking on the paint job and interior finish; spreading iyt to the running gear seems the next logical step.
 

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Lots of good excuses here...but let's be real, I love my MO but face it, the MO was overvalued to begin with. MO's sold for significantly under sticker price all over the country (I have a fully loaded MO, sticker was also $37,500...I paid $33). As I said, this indicated to the industry that a Murano was an overvalued vehicle. I checked the resale value of a 2003 MO...in late 2003...and the trade in value was in the mid $20's...in the same year that it was new! (...even with that 37,500 sticker!).

Of course, the "private sale" value and the "suggested retail" value were both higher (Kelley Blue Book gives you all 3 categories.)
 

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That is exactly..

Lots of good excuses here...but let's be real, I love my MO but face it, the MO was overvalued to begin with. MO's sold for significantly under sticker price all over the country (I have a fully loaded MO, sticker was also $37,500...I paid $33). As I said, this indicated to the industry that a Murano was an overvalued vehicle. I checked the resale value of a 2003 MO...in late 2003...and the trade in value was in the mid $20's...in the same year that it was new! (...even with that 37,500 sticker!).
That is exactly my analysis when i buy my 03. That is why i get the base 03 SL AWD. To me, the base murano has good price and resale value without all the options are only $1.5K-$2K of a mo with all options (minus nav).
 
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