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Did a quick Photoshop job to try to see how various wheels would look on my car. I think the Helos might be the best for overall unity with the lights and body panels and look of liquid metal. The shape between spokes closely mimics the fog light housing. I wished it had some darker accents to offset the intense brightness. The Giavanni's are kind of interesting and fit in with the depressed body panels. Reminds me of something out of the movie Megaforce. Not sure if the Bezina's are too busy, but there's something about them that I like, though they'd probably work better with the earlier 3rd Gen grille that's looks menorah-like. The Asanti A/Fs are still a favorite (love the deep recess) , but due to the overly large brand lettering and white inner ring I'd need to paint that ring boulder gray. The greyed ring does look better. Fumos aren't too bad, and I originally wanted them because the slots tie into the fog light housing holes, that you can't really see in this pic, plus I've always loved the glaive in the movie Krull.. However, not sure if a starfish design is really meant for this car, plus the overall presentation seems somewhat thin and weak-looking. There are a few other wheels that look great but are way too costly to bother considering. And I don't really want to attract attention to the wheels, I want something to compliment and pickup the lines and angles of the panels and trim. I don't dislike the stock wheels, I just wished they had some kind of curvature to them. They seem durable and are easy to maintain.
 

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I'd vote for the Helo's. I like the open look and not too busy. Let's you show off custom brakes, if you have them.

Have a good day.
 

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I'm thinking of downsizing from 20" wheels to 18" wheels on my 2018 Platinum.
 

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I'm thinking of downsizing from 20" wheels to 18" wheels on my 2018 Platinum.
That would move you to a higher profile sidewall tire to keep the speedometer accurate, which would also make for a smoother ride.
 

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When doing a 7500 tire rotation recently it felt like the lugnuts were barely on. The driver-front was the loosest. The owner's manual calls for 83 ft. lbs., but these factory-installed lugs felt between 20 and 30. Moral of the story: don't rely on the manufacturer/dealership to have done things correctly. Check everything yourself.
 

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Are you changing wheels without a torque wrench?? You don't mention one.

Yes, they look loose, but that's not what concerns me.

But if you didn't personally change and torque them, you need to use a torque wrench. Always.

If a shop last changed them, you should always check the torque on every lug nut as soon as you get it home.

I didn't watch the whole video, but your post doesn't mention a torque wrench. The fact that you didn't mention a torque wrench concerns me.
 

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The first thing I did when I brought my new '19 home was to inspect everything, including checking the lugnut torque. A couple of them were on the loose side of the specified torque...
 
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On my personal vehicles, I've never torqued lugnuts and since 1983 have never had a problem doing it by feel. I have a good sense for where the tightness should be.
 

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On my personal vehicles, I've never torqued lugnuts and since 1983 have never had a problem doing it by feel. I have a good sense for where the tightness should be.
I stand by my earlier comment. Torquing lugs prevents both warping from over-tightening (unlikely if you do it by hand and lugs working loose (more likely.) When you know how to do this and pass on it, you know you're taking an unnecessary chance. I think this was less critical with older steel wheels, but on cast aluminum wheels it's really important to avoid damage.

And as you discovered, there is no substitute for checking torque after having anyone else work on your car. I have found lugs both ridiculously tight, and somewhat under-torqued. I stareted giving the torque spec to any shop working on my car, and I still check when I get it home.

But hey, I've only been doing it for a bit over 50 years.
 

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Engineers have to come up with a "safe, optimal" spec that accounts for expansion and contraction of the type of wheel material under hot and cold conditions. What's the most torque that can be applied to a wheel before the metal is compromised, and what's the minimum torque that can be applied to the lugs to hold the wheel on without them ever falling off? Somewhere in between all the factors is the number we're given. You could probably go 75-100 ft. lbs. over spec and probably under by 50 and never have a problem. In my recent case, my lugs from the factory seemed to be torqued to around 20-30, and I put on 7500 miles without an issue. You could tell from my previous video that the lugs were nicely seated, weren't loosening and had held on just fine, and they were just under-torqued by about 50. I used to have buddies that drove around with 2-3 lugs on and they never had problems with wheels falling off, or warping or causing rotor deformation, etc. I really feel a lot of that is nervous nellie myth and based on extreme cases of improper upkeep, possibly stuck calipers and just being stupid or careless when installing wheels. The worst case I personally experienced on one of my cars was overtightening on a steel wheel where the lug pushed through one of the holes (it was an old, worn wheel) and luckily the other three holes were fine. Of course, I eventually went to a salvage yard and got a better wheel. If these were racing vehicles or customers' car, of course torquing to spec is necessary.

In any case, I decided to jack up MO21 and check each wheel's lugs, and the locking nuts were under-torqued by 3-5, and the others were over-torqued by 4-6. That makes sense, since I'm always thinking the wrench will slip off the locking nut's socket setup, so I don't use the same repetitive technique when tightening them. I consider that more than acceptable given the tolerances of the components. However, you can all breathe easy knowing that I torqued every wheel to spec. Would I ever tell someone not to torque to spec? Of course not.

EDIT: And the vehicle I ever did the most tire rotations on was my 2003 MO. After nearly two decades of hand-tightening those original wheels (and using original rotors) there was never a problem where anything deformed or was damaged; they still rode beautifully after 300,000+ miles of use.
 

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Using a torque wrench is ideal for safety and integrity of the components.

Not using a torque wrench can be marginal for safety and integrity of components...

It's an engineering thing...
 
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Using a torque wrench is ideal for safety and integrity of the components.

Not using a torque wrench can be marginal for safety and integrity of components...
I agree wholeheartedly with your first sentence, disagree with the second. Parts (and specs) are typically over-engineered and over-thought to account for someone not doing everything perfectly correct. I'm sure most garages or DIY'ers aren't calibrating the torque wrench after using it every 12 or so times (if ever). There's always a range of "degree of acceptability" outside of most specs that won't lead to failure or problems in this lifetime. We're not launching ships into space or splitting atoms here. :) Ideal does not mean absolute-must, it means just what it implies. In a perfect world, under perfect conditions, to squeeze every last miniscule molecule of safety/effectiveness from something, you should use "X" number. However, using any number within plus/minus such-and-such of "X" will still work perfectly fine, it just won't be...well...ideal. As repairs are made and aftermarket parts are used (all of which will likely have different integrities than those used in testing labs) the original spec becomes less reliable, and I'm sure that factor is also considered when deriving at an ideal spec. Let's try to get everyone as close to "X" as possible, realizing that most will probably only get within 25% of that range (over or under) which still falls within our "zone of safety/efficacy" for this application, even when factoring in various conditions/materials used later on.
 

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I figure that an error of up to 10% plus or minus is safe on torquing wheels. Anything more than that, I'm not willing to work with.
 
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